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Thai Cuisine

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NEWS
February 2, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The new Siam Cuisine in Newtown offers a relatively rare opportunity for suburban diners to experience the enormous appeal of Thai cuisine. Siam Cuisine, a branch of the restaurant of the same name at 925 Arch St. in Philadelphia, is among the very few suburban restaurants specializing in Thai dishes. Silk of Siam in Bryn Mawr and Touch of Siam in East Lansdowne are my two other favorites in this select group. Several other restaurants offer French-Thai cuisine, a slightly different although equally delightful culinary approach.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to grace and delicacy, there's little to match Thai cuisine. Unfortunately, Thai dishes generally are not available in New Jersey; but with the opening last July of a little storefront restaurant named Siam in Lambertville, we at long last can get a taste of this civilized style of cooking. The family-run restaurant is owned by Thai-born Timmy Tangtakul, chef at Hotel du Village in New Hope, and his American-born wife, Dency. A Thai husband and wife who do the cooking at the Siam have mastered the refined essence of this beautiful cuisine.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Several weeks ago The New York Times announced that Thai food was emerging as the next significant cuisine. Where have they been? Philadelphia has been enjoying Thai cooking (that's Thailand, folks, not Taiwan) for well over a decade. The Thai Royal Barge on 23rd Street was probably the first Thai restaurant in the area. Then came Bankok House (an old favorite of mine, though I haven't been there for some time), Siam, The King and I, Manu's (which I've heard good things about but have not yet visited)
FOOD
May 3, 1987 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I am apprehensive writing about Siam Lotus. If too many of you like what you read here, you'll rush over, take all the parking spaces, overtax the slow-moving kitchen, crowd the long and narrow dining room, and keep the new Thai restaurant's single, good-natured server too busy to explain how to fold a linen napkin into a flower shape. So take it easy, OK? And know what to expect. For starters, be aware that this Lotus blooms on a stretch of Spring Garden Street dominated by down-at-the-heels storefronts, warehouses and one of the city's best-known gun shops.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even among Thai restaurants, Silk Cuisine in Bryn Mawr stands out for the sheer delicacy of its food. Considering the competition from the many good Thai restaurants throughout the suburbs, that's quite an achievement. Silk Cuisine is a branch of another superb Thai restaurant, Silk of Siam, which is just a few doors away at the southern end of the 600 block of Lancaster Avenue. Silk Cuisine is at 656 W. Lancaster Ave., its parent at 614. While both are excellent, Silk Cuisine is larger, brighter and a bit more attractive.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To truly appreciate Thai food, you need to take your time and savor the aromas. I thought that was especially true during a meal at the Royal Thai Orchid, an elegant BYO that defies its commercial surroundings in the Westgate Plaza. Our appetizers - the aptly named Steamy Crepes and Tulip Dumplings (for their decorative shape) - each sent up a waft of aromas. For the next few minutes, my table delved into the delicate rice-flour wrappers of the crepes, releasing the scents of a dusky ground chicken, sweet turnips and meaty peanuts.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
A lot can happen in two years. That's how long it had been since a visit to Siri's Thai French in Cherry Hill. Chef/owner Siri Yothchavit did more than just renovate the restaurant. She took over the storefront next door, adding a patisserie and another dining room. The change is a good one. From the outside, Siri's Thai French, located in a strip center across from the Garden State Racetrack, doesn't look impressive. But come inside, and the restaurant's handsome interior is an oasis of calm and good taste.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
If you find yourself down on your luck at the Garden State racetrack, cross Route 70 for a sure bet. Siri's Thai French, located in the shopping center directly across from the track, may not look like much from the outside. But step inside this unassuming Cherry Hill restaurant and you embark on a journey into the exotic tastes and aromas of Thai cuisine - an experience guaranteed to get your mind off your losing streak. The restaurant's interior is warm and charming, accented with touches from chef/owner Siri Yothchavit's homeland - carved wood cornices, Thai goddess statuettes - even the salt and pepper shakers and bud vases on every table are distinguished by a parade of elephants marching along their pewter surfaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1995 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
A30-minute drive from Thailand's capital, Bangkok, will bring you to Tamnack Thai, which markets itself as the world's largest restaurant. Since it can accommodate as many as 3,000 people, it probably has earned that promotional privilege. Tamnack Thai, which translates to Thai Palace, is surrounded by 10 acres of breathtaking gardens. It has nightly shows to accompany meals that are brought to tables by hundreds of servers on roller skates. Its manager was quoted once as saying that the restaurant's customers didn't necessarily come for the food.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New York couldn't handle another Thai restaurant. The market for Southeast Asian food was becoming so saturated in the mid-1980s that it was no longer confined to Manhattan's Chinatown. By 1984, someone could order some tilapia in red curry sauce in any of the five boroughs. Sompong Pongsi, a recent Thai immigrant and budding restaurateur, saw this and knew if he ever wanted to open his own eatery he would have to move on. So Pongsi packed his bag and headed down the Jersey Turnpike.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012
What to eat: In a city long underserved by Thai cuisine, Robert Zapata has taken the food truck world by storm with a Thai and Mexican lunch fusion. There may not be a more original dish in Philadelphia than Cucina Zapata's Cap'n Crunch-crusted tilapia burrito. If you aren't a fan of the flaky white fish for its texture, the Cap'n makes it crunch with an unmistakable childhood flavor before it is piled with avocado, a mild pico de gallo and a tangy peanut sauce. Insane value: Two juicy Thai short rib tacos ($6)
FOOD
November 25, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Since meeting in the Bronx as teenagers, Suad Hadzovic and Lalitta Ardhan have dreamed of opening their own restaurant. Money was an object. So was deciding on the concept. He is from Kosovo and her family is from Thailand. After years of saving - and marriage, three children, and a relocation to Pleasantville, N.J. - they have taken the plunge in a Cherry Hill strip center with Umpasri . Thai cuisine won. Ardhan's father, Joe, a 30-year kitchen veteran, and his wife, Bowe, are cooking.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2005 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From Baltimore to Woodland Avenues, and squared off by 43d and 45th Streets, Clark Park's nine acres of green are where University City residents and beyond have come to feed the soul for years. Today's Clark Park Fall Festival, organized by the Clark Park Music and Art Community and Vitamin D productions, offers sustenance of all kinds with musical acts, arts and crafts, food from local vendors, and plenty to do for the kids. Held for the last 35 years to welcome autumn - there is also a festival to mark the start of summer - the Clark Park fete has a unique, spiritual feel.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sabai Thai, an authentic Thai restaurant in Newtown Square, is named for a decorative sash typically worn with a wedding dress. It's an appropriate name for a close-knit family establishment owned by a woman. Toi Ken, who runs the Sabai, a BYO, with the help of her husband, sister and daughter, grew up in the restaurant business. Her family owned a restaurant in Thailand, and she worked in various cities, including Boston and San Diego, before settling in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To truly appreciate Thai food, you need to take your time and savor the aromas. I thought that was especially true during a meal at the Royal Thai Orchid, an elegant BYO that defies its commercial surroundings in the Westgate Plaza. Our appetizers - the aptly named Steamy Crepes and Tulip Dumplings (for their decorative shape) - each sent up a waft of aromas. For the next few minutes, my table delved into the delicate rice-flour wrappers of the crepes, releasing the scents of a dusky ground chicken, sweet turnips and meaty peanuts.
NEWS
January 19, 2003 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The new chef-owner of a longtime French restaurant, the Black Walnut, is not the only chef in the kitchen of what is now called Siam Cuisine at the Black Walnut. Chum Long is willing to share this small townhouse space along the so-called restaurant row so he may bring diners, he says with pride, French-Thai fusion cuisine. In the kitchen, Long oversees Chris Smith, the Black Walnut's former sous chef, and Peter Phetpha, who once made signature Thai dishes at Long's first restaurant, Siam Cuisine, still on Arch Street in Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even among Thai restaurants, Silk Cuisine in Bryn Mawr stands out for the sheer delicacy of its food. Considering the competition from the many good Thai restaurants throughout the suburbs, that's quite an achievement. Silk Cuisine is a branch of another superb Thai restaurant, Silk of Siam, which is just a few doors away at the southern end of the 600 block of Lancaster Avenue. Silk Cuisine is at 656 W. Lancaster Ave., its parent at 614. While both are excellent, Silk Cuisine is larger, brighter and a bit more attractive.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
A lot can happen in two years. That's how long it had been since a visit to Siri's Thai French in Cherry Hill. Chef/owner Siri Yothchavit did more than just renovate the restaurant. She took over the storefront next door, adding a patisserie and another dining room. The change is a good one. From the outside, Siri's Thai French, located in a strip center across from the Garden State Racetrack, doesn't look impressive. But come inside, and the restaurant's handsome interior is an oasis of calm and good taste.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | By Scott Fallon, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New York couldn't handle another Thai restaurant. The market for Southeast Asian food was becoming so saturated in the mid-1980s that it was no longer confined to Manhattan's Chinatown. By 1984, someone could order some tilapia in red curry sauce in any of the five boroughs. Sompong Pongsi, a recent Thai immigrant and budding restaurateur, saw this and knew if he ever wanted to open his own eatery he would have to move on. So Pongsi packed his bag and headed down the Jersey Turnpike.
NEWS
January 21, 1998 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
Somsak Pramojanee and his wife, Pam, spend a lot of time on the road - driving between their two Thai restaurants, the original in Voorhees and their second location in Cherry Hill. Both restaurants have the same menu and chef Pam's commitment to preparing authentic Thai cuisine, without the use of MSG or other artificial flavor enhancers. A recent visit to the restaurant's newer location delivered a first-rate experience, rich with the flavors that dominate Thai cuisine - basil, curry, coconut, garlic, lemon grass and plenty of chili.
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