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Thanksgiving

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NEWS
October 6, 1998
If you won't be spending Thanksgiving with relatives, who will you be with and why? Send essays of no more than 200 words to Community Voices/Thanksgiving at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. The deadline is Oct. 23. Questions? Call Cynthia Henry, assistant editor, at 215-854-2959.
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Townsend "Tod" Wentz was growing up in Palmyra, Burlington County, his family's Thanksgiving table varied depending on who was cooking dinner. When his German-English relatives hosted, the holiday meant turkey, gravy, green beans, and stuffing. But when his Polish grandmother was in charge, it was a feast of ham, stuffed cabbage, and coleslaw. Now that Wentz is the one doing the cooking, he does the only logical thing: He makes all of the above. Only he refines the dishes with the classical French techniques that have become the hallmark of his six-month-old restaurant, Townsend, on East Passyunk Avenue's booming restaurant corridor.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To commemorate the Thanksgiving holiday, many churches and synagogues will host Thanksgiving interfaith community services tomorrow. Among them are: West Chester community service, 7:30 p.m. at SS. Peter and Paul Church, 1325 Boot Rd. Rabbi David Glanzberg-Krainin of Kesher Israel Congregation will be one of the speakers. Marple-Newtown Clergy Association service, 8 p.m. at St. Anastasia Roman Catholic Church, 3302 West Chester Pike, Newtown Square. Rabbi Barry Blum will deliver the sermon.
NEWS
November 29, 2004 | MICHELLE MALKIN
My 4-year-old daughter recently learned to say grace at mealtimes. I taught her the same little prayer my mom taught me in childhood: God is great, God is good. Let us thank Him for our food. By His hands we all are fed. Give us Lord our daily bread. Amen. At first, my daughter questioned the need for reciting this strange passage. "Why do we have to thank God?" she wondered. "To show that we are grateful for our daily bread," I explained. " 'What is 'grateful?' " she asked.
LIVING
November 24, 1996 | By Ellen O'Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before the toasts, before the stuffing, sometimes even before the kickoffs, comes the grace. At Thanksgiving tables far and wide this week, parents and grandparents will rise and offer their blessings to the assembled. This can be an awkward moment in households unaccustomed to praying aloud. In many other homes, though, the blessings are joyous and freely offered. From the first, Thanksgiving has been set apart as a prayerful day, and it has brought a rich trove of blessings.
SPORTS
April 10, 2007 | By Shannon Ryan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Villanova has learned the rest of its possible competitors for the Old Spice Classic basketball tournament over Thanksgiving weekend in Orlando, Fla. The field also will include Penn State, George Mason, Kansas State, Central Florida, North Carolina State, Rider, and South Carolina. The Old Spice Classic games will be televised by ESPN2 and ESPNU from Nov. 22 to 25. All eight teams will play three games in a bracketed-tournament format at the Milk House at Disney's Wide World of Sports Complex.
SPORTS
November 20, 1989 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just as they share at the dinner table on Thanksgiving, many families share football - on TV or in a stadium of high school fans. Especially fathers and sons, some of whom have suited up in the uniform of the same school to play Thanksgiving games. At least six families share the distinction of having played, or participated, in the same Thanksgiving game. In one case, four generations have played for the same school. Interestingly, all these combinations of fathers and sons - the Pettines, the Millers, the Deckers, the Baurs, the Gilberts and the Morgantis - have passed the same first name down at least one generation.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
The Jaindl farm in Orefield, Lehigh County, is a family affair in the fullest sense. On one side are Fred Jaindl, his four sons and three daughters. On the other are about 1.1 million turkeys who are bred, hatched, grown and processed at the farm each year - including 200,000 that get gobbled up for Thanksgiving. The Jaindls even grow their own crops for feed on the 10,000- acre operation, which has been a going concern for about 50 years.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Stephanie Banchero, Special to The Inquirer
The students - some outfitted in American Indian and Pilgrim attire, others dressed as turkeys or cranberry bushes - enthralled their standing-room-only audience. Flash bulbs popped and video cameras hummed, while parents offered last-minute stage direction - "Tilt your feathers," "Straighten your hat" and "Comb your hair down" - from the audience. It's not all turkey and stuffing at Thanksgiving. At least not for the 200 youngsters who attend Conshohocken Elementary School. As part of a special Thanksgiving celebration, the students spent last month focusing on the origin of the holiday and on being thankful.
NEWS
November 26, 2009 | By Paul F. Bradley
There were still deposits of strange makeup in a few hard-to-reach places. Choice candy bars rested atop the trick-or-treat haul. And the jack-o'-lantern still had a good week or so to go before it would decay into a reeking pulp. And yet, there it was: a smarmy Christmas commercial for Kay Jewelers, where every kiss begins with K - and ends with a maxed-out credit card. Kay wasn't the only perpetrator. The Gap's annoying cheer factory was pumping out bilious chants about the pressing need to stuff stockings before Veterans Day. Kmart, Wal-Mart, and Hyundai were hot on their heels with must-shop-now Christmas advertisements.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
My Philadelphia childhood straddled two unlikely culinary traditions: the fertile fields of Lancaster County and Boston's briny North Shore. Maybe not so odd, after all. Both championed fresh, local ingredients that were unpretentiously prepared. Our food looked exactly like what it was, and it was delicious. Why ruin it with fancy stuff, even on holidays? From Mom's roots in Ephrata, Pa., came Cope's dried corn, crunchy coleslaw with hard-boiled eggs and cream, and - oh man, the desserts!
NEWS
November 21, 2014
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, what kind of red wine should I get for Thanksgiving? Marnie: That depends on what you're serving. Is it the traditional holiday meal? Buzz: Yup. Turkey and ham, cranberry relish, sweet potatoes and stuffing - the works. Marnie: OK, Buzz, there's really only one thing to bear in mind, then, when you choose a wine. I know you prefer dry wines, but you should get something that tastes noticeably sweet. Buzz: I quit drinking Bali Hai and Mad Dog 20-20 in college.
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Townsend "Tod" Wentz was growing up in Palmyra, Burlington County, his family's Thanksgiving table varied depending on who was cooking dinner. When his German-English relatives hosted, the holiday meant turkey, gravy, green beans, and stuffing. But when his Polish grandmother was in charge, it was a feast of ham, stuffed cabbage, and coleslaw. Now that Wentz is the one doing the cooking, he does the only logical thing: He makes all of the above. Only he refines the dishes with the classical French techniques that have become the hallmark of his six-month-old restaurant, Townsend, on East Passyunk Avenue's booming restaurant corridor.
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
According to a recent poll by Food & Wine magazine, 58 percent of Americans who drink wine on Thanksgiving (and that's 86 percent of drinkers) go for pinot noir. It's no wonder, since that mid-weight red is among the most flexible choices to handle the wide range of flavors on the table. But which pinot to purchase? I side with the 68 percent of those surveyed who go for American for this definitively all-American holiday. And in years past, I've gravitated toward the earthier, tarter bottles from Oregon.
NEWS
November 21, 2014
BACK IN the Norman Rockwell days, Thanksgiving dinner was unified. All eyes at the table hungrily focused on that giant roast turkey that Grandma was placing on the table, everybody with a single thought: Gimme. Nowadays, there's your gluten-free cousin, your soy-allergic aunt, somebody's lactose-intolerant boyfriend, a niece who shuns meat for ethical reasons. Unity is gone - how can you make one meal to satisfy all these requirements? Now imagine you're trying to satisfy not a handful but 300 people.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
THANKSGIVING week is primo time for benefit concerts with a serious reunion component. Take, please, this Sunday's get-together of local alt-rock notables at the Ardmore Music Hall. A show top-billed by the rarely together Huffamoose, and featuring seasoned singer/songwriters Jim Boggia and Ben Arnold, and (Huffamoose offshoot) the Fractals. No, there's not a turkey among 'em. So, what's the deal? 'Tis the season when musicians and patrons feel generous of spirit, happy to put out effort and bucks for a worthy cause.
SPORTS
October 24, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Basketball, wrestling, and indoor track teams in the Colonial Conference and Cape-Atlantic League will be able to start practice on Nov. 24. The same likely will be true for many teams in the Burlington County Scholastic League. But teams in the Olympic Conference will have to wait a week and won't be able to start the winter season until Dec. 1. That staggered start is a result of a decision made by the Olympic Conference to overrule a pilot program established by the NJSIAA in September to allow boys' and girls' basketball teams to start practice on the Monday before Thanksgiving.
SPORTS
September 12, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Wrestling might join football as the only New Jersey high school sports with competition in five groups. The NJSIAA took a major step toward creating a Group 5 in wrestling on Wednesday. By a 26-6 margin, the NJSIAA's executive committee passed on first reading a proposal to expand the state wrestling team tournament to five groups. If the proposal passes on its second reading in October, the change will go into effect for this winter season's state tournament.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in 16 days, fire trucks, ambulances, and police vehicles descended Friday on the ResinTech building on Cooper Road in West Berlin. But this time the flames were licking at hamburgers, and the blue-gray smoke wafting under a big white tent smelled of hot dogs and barbecued chicken. It was ResinTech's way of saying thanks to the emergency squads and employees who responded May 8 to an astonishingly fast-moving fire that consumed the manufacturing plant of its subsidiary, Aries Filterworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there Spotting Charlie at their mutual friends' rehearsal dinner, Alexis walked over to say hello. They had met a few years before, when Alexis, who is from Mount Airy, was a student at Barnard College in New York, and Charlie, from Glencoe, Ill, was at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass. Mutual friends had a party at Penn. Alexis hadn't thought about Charlie until a few weeks before that June 2010 wedding, when another mutual friend suggested they might get along.
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