CollectionsThanksgiving Dinner
IN THE NEWS

Thanksgiving Dinner

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | By Dominic Sama, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students, their families and teachers in Radnor Township, to bring the city and suburbs closer together, will hold a Thanksgiving Day dinner tonight for more than 50 refugees living in West Philadelphia. The holiday dinner will be held in the high school cafeteria for people from Angola, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Hungary and Vietnam. The school district will provide a bus to transport the refugees. "This will be the first Thanksgiving for some of the refugees," said Lois Wysocki, a teacher and an organizer of the dinner.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does it take to make Thanksgiving dinner for 1,000 people? About eight volunteers, and about 700 pounds of turkey, and equal portions of mashed potatoes, stuffing, sweet potato pies and green beans. On Monday evening, a group from the Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia began preparing homemade dinners they'll serve this Thanksgiving holiday. By Tuesday afternoon, they were finishing their prep work, which will be presented Thursday at the Salvation Army's Soups On!
NEWS
November 21, 2014
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, what kind of red wine should I get for Thanksgiving? Marnie: That depends on what you're serving. Is it the traditional holiday meal? Buzz: Yup. Turkey and ham, cranberry relish, sweet potatoes and stuffing - the works. Marnie: OK, Buzz, there's really only one thing to bear in mind, then, when you choose a wine. I know you prefer dry wines, but you should get something that tastes noticeably sweet. Buzz: I quit drinking Bali Hai and Mad Dog 20-20 in college.
FOOD
November 21, 2001 | By Sam Gugino FOR THE INQUIRER
Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday, especially when I can cook for family and friends. Maybe you feel the same way but have been so busy this fall that you still think it's October. Or maybe you just don't want to deal with all those leftovers, turkey sandwiches and turkey soup. Then this meal is for you: Thanksgiving dinner for four in 15 minutes. No prepping ahead of time. No leftovers. No frantic calls to the Meat and Poultry Hotline. ("Is my turkey still good if it's been frozen since the Reagan administration?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
THANKSGIVING DAY, you and your family will gather 'round for extreme feasting on roast turkey, gravy, stuffing and the rest. Your belly will be filled to bursting - but your wallet may be dangerously thin. Thanksgiving dinner will set you back $50 to $100 and up for a 10-person meal. That price has steadily increased in the past decade, jumping as much as 11 percent just last year, according to published reports. As this holiday season approaches, Americans' finances are already in turmoil from dipping housing values, an uncertain stock market and a shaky job market.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sixteen tables were set up. On the food line, the aroma of turkey, stuffing and the trimmings steamed up from the trays. Servers waited, ladles at parade rest. Nearby, a table groaned under several tiers of pie and cake. Clearly, all was ready for this dinner for the needy. Only one problem. Not too many showed up. Members of the Foster Military Lodge in Willingboro hoped that up to 150 would partake yesterday of their first Thanksgiving meal for the down and out, but after the allotted two hours, there still was a lot of turkey, ham, mashed potatoes, string beans, rolls and cranberry sauce left.
FOOD
November 21, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
The first American Thanksgiving ended up starting more than one national tradition. There came to be, of course, the annual Thanksgiving feast and holiday. But it also could be credited with starting our tradition of "potluck" and "bring-a-dish" dinners. When the English settlers (mostly Pilgrims) invited the Wampanoag Indian chief and his "family" to join in celebrating the newcomers' first harvest of largely foreign foods on foreign soil they had crossed an ocean to possess, they hadn't factored in the American Indian philosophy that all men are brothers.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A few years ago, Herb Balian bought 320 place settings of china for the West Chester Community Center. The purchase meant that when his "family" arrived for Thanksgiving dinner, he was ready. Balian's family, at least on Thanksgiving, can consist of as many as 250 people. They are not just those who are needy, but also those who are lonely with nowhere else to go, he said. "I always wanted to do something like this," said Balian, who has been organizing Thanksgiving day dinners, with a cadre of volunteers, for 11 years in West Chester.
NEWS
November 27, 1996 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Gary Schindler says he and wife Marci will prepare a ton of turkey for Thanksgiving, he is being modest. Actually, they expect to roast well over 2,000 pounds. The Schindlers, proprietors of Main Line Turkey on Station Avenue in Ardmore, will fire up the ovens at midnight before the holiday to begin cooking. He and other caterers have discovered a booming trade selling Thanksgiving meals to customers who want the feast at home, but not the slicing, dicing and basting that precedes the tasting.
FOOD
November 6, 2003 | By Beverly Levitt FOR THE INQUIRER
When Peter Hedges decided to write a script about how a rebellious black-sheep daughter would make amends to her intransigent white-bread mother, he imagined her making a special dinner for her mom. Recalling his own childhood, he thought of Thanksgiving, the special meal in his family. Then the realization hit: He hadn't the faintest idea how to cook, let alone make a complex Thanksgiving feast. So it was that, just as April does in Hedges' new film, Pieces of April, the first-time director phoned home and asked his father how he had made the family's Thanksgiving dinners.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 29, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
The McBride family from Northeast Philadelphia started their Christmas season with a trip to Christmas Village on Thanksgiving Day. By 5:30 p.m., Dylan, 6, and Danny, 3 - both of whom are on Santa's "nice" list - were with their parents in the Macy's lobby on Juniper Street, waiting for the store to open. "Since we were here walking around, we figured we'd wait since the opening was at 6," said Robert McBride, the boys' father. Their mother, Jamie, had the day off for the first time in years.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
What does it take to make Thanksgiving dinner for 1,000 people? About eight volunteers, and about 700 pounds of turkey, and equal portions of mashed potatoes, stuffing, sweet potato pies and green beans. On Monday evening, a group from the Salvation Army of Greater Philadelphia began preparing homemade dinners they'll serve this Thanksgiving holiday. By Tuesday afternoon, they were finishing their prep work, which will be presented Thursday at the Salvation Army's Soups On!
NEWS
November 21, 2014
BACK IN the Norman Rockwell days, Thanksgiving dinner was unified. All eyes at the table hungrily focused on that giant roast turkey that Grandma was placing on the table, everybody with a single thought: Gimme. Nowadays, there's your gluten-free cousin, your soy-allergic aunt, somebody's lactose-intolerant boyfriend, a niece who shuns meat for ethical reasons. Unity is gone - how can you make one meal to satisfy all these requirements? Now imagine you're trying to satisfy not a handful but 300 people.
NEWS
November 21, 2014
B UZZ: Hey, Marnie, what kind of red wine should I get for Thanksgiving? Marnie: That depends on what you're serving. Is it the traditional holiday meal? Buzz: Yup. Turkey and ham, cranberry relish, sweet potatoes and stuffing - the works. Marnie: OK, Buzz, there's really only one thing to bear in mind, then, when you choose a wine. I know you prefer dry wines, but you should get something that tastes noticeably sweet. Buzz: I quit drinking Bali Hai and Mad Dog 20-20 in college.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013
THANKSGIVING is next week, and already some people are feeling anxious about gaining unwanted weight. If you're not even a little bit nervous, maybe you should be. On average, the typical American Thanksgiving meal is a 3,000-calorie slog, and some experts say we'll consume a whopping 4,500 calories before the day is done. Your body will need 8 to 12 hours just to digest it all. To burn off all the calories would require 8 to 10 hours of moderate cardiovascular exercise. Yikes!
NEWS
November 20, 2012 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
CECELIA KELLY and Marguerite Dobson met 34 years ago at a senior center in Southwest Philadelphia. Dobson, now 85, was a volunteer. Kelly, now 90, sat alone that day, lonely and sad. Her mother had just died and she wanted company. She'd never been to the center before. She looked around, spotted Dobson's warm smile with crinkles around her eyes, and mustered enough courage to walk over. "Can I sit here?" Kelly asked her. The two Irish women, both born in the Roaring Twenties, a decade of Prohibition, Flappers and the first "talkies," hit it off and became best friends.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
IT MAY BE the Elmer Fudd of poultry, but the turkey can be a downright terrifying bird. As Thanksgiving bears down on home chefs everywhere, mocking images of Norman Rockwell perfection are enough to give even a confident cook a case of the jitters. There's just so much expectation stuffed into that bird, not to mention a table full of armchair quarterbacks eager to critique this most American of repasts. Thankfully, there are turkey-day experts to come to the rescue. We huddled with folks schooled in all things Thanksgiving, wise in the ways of roasting, pie making and sides.
NEWS
July 13, 2012 | By Morgan Zalot and Daily News Staff Writer
The last words Officer Brian Lorenzo said to fellow Highway Patrolman Kyle Mallard are something that will always stick with the fallen officer's comrade. "He said, ‘Have a safe ride,' and I said, ‘I will,'" Mallard recalled outside the viewing for Lorenzo at Givnish Funeral Home on Academy Road Thursday night. "That's what I go back to," he said, stopping to shake hands and embrace colleagues leaving the funeral home. Mallard worked with Lorenzo, a 23-year veteran of the force, on Saturday night and last saw him hours before police say a drunk, wrong-way driver plowed into Lorenzo, killing him instantly, as the officer rode his Highway Patrol Harley-Davidson Road King up I-95 on his way home early Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2011
Q: I am a 45-year-old woman. I recently went back to school to start a new career. One of my professors is a wonderful young man. I usually show up in his class a half-hour early to study. He is usually there at that time and we have had many personal conversations. I am anxious about my grades. I told him that and he started emailing me my grades within three hours of taking the test. He never sends anything personal. My husband seems to think this man has a crush on me. What I feel for this man is maternal, not romantic.
SPORTS
November 25, 2011 | BY TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
WHEN HE SAID he'd experienced "a little bit of an uh-oh feeling," Eric Medes probably was grossly understating the case. After all, St. Joseph's Prep had blown leads - two even "comfortable" - in its previous three Thanksgiving meetings with Malvern Prep and had been smoked by Roman Catholic, 45-17, in a Catholic AAAA semifinal back on Nov. 5 after building a 17-7 pad. So, what happened yesterday at Plymouth-Whitemarsh High, after Malvern...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|