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Thanksgiving

NEWS
November 23, 2006
It is a good and healthy activity on Thanksgiving to recall not only what we have appreciated in the past year, but to consider what we would be grateful to see happen in the coming 12 months. Welcome to the Editorial Board's groaning board of Thanksgiving wishes. Some items on our list speak to the diversions that bring us together. Most, though, refer to more solemn matters of community, state and nation. Pull up a chair and take a read. When you're done, take time (or more time)
FOOD
November 21, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
According to a recent poll by Food & Wine magazine, 58 percent of Americans who drink wine on Thanksgiving (and that's 86 percent of drinkers) go for pinot noir. It's no wonder, since that mid-weight red is among the most flexible choices to handle the wide range of flavors on the table. But which pinot to purchase? I side with the 68 percent of those surveyed who go for American for this definitively all-American holiday. And in years past, I've gravitated toward the earthier, tarter bottles from Oregon.
NEWS
November 22, 2007 | By Debi Ghate
Ah, Thanksgiving. To most of us, the word conjures up images of turkey dinner, pumpkin pie, and watching football with family and friends. It kicks off the holiday season and is the biggest shopping weekend of the year. We're taught that Thanksgiving came about when pilgrims gave thanks to God for a bountiful harvest. We mumble thanks for the food on our table, the roof over our head, and the loved ones around us. We casually think about how lucky we are and how much better our lives are than, say, those in Bhutan.
NEWS
November 28, 2002
Are we a thankful nation? The holiday celebrated today with parades, pigskins and pumpkin pies poses that question, and provides evidence pro and con. Pro: One of the first instincts of the first white settlers of this nation was to enact a post-harvest ritual of giving thanks. The tradition endured in New England for centuries and was enshrined as a national rite by Abraham Lincoln - in the midst of a national schism that gave more reasons for tears than thanks. Few American civic rituals generate more effort, more energy, more fellow feeling and charitable activity than this observance on the last Thursday of November.
LIVING
November 24, 1999 | By Gloria Gale, FOR THE INQUIRER
With all the anticipation surrounding Christmas, Thanksgiving somehow gets overlooked as a time devoted to giving your home the spirit of the harvest. When it comes to decorating for the holidays, Thanksgiving is the stepchild of the winter holiday line-up. Squeezed between Halloween's gaudy dress-up and the glitz of Christmas, Thanksgiving's bountiful offerings often get neglected. We tend to focus on food rather than decor. Thanksgiving, when family comes together, is an ideal time to devote attention to your home.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | by Yvette Ousley , Daily News Staff Writer
A Common Pleas Court judge yesterday directed the School District to see that employees who have been victimized by its troubled new computer system are paid by Thanksgiving. Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe gave the district 24 hours to come up with a plan to insure correct payments to its workers by next Wednesday. The judge acted on a complaint filed yesterday by three of the unions representing district employees, whose leaders became exasperated when the same payroll troubles that have afflicted their members since last summer continued with last week's paychecks.
NEWS
November 21, 2007 | By Claude Lewis
I am not one to celebrate most holidays. Presidents' Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day - all of them hold significance for lots of folks, I'm sure. But some holidays aren't worth it. For example, we long ago gave up on the commercialism of Christmas. Halloween? Not even a real holiday. July Fourth? Every day should be July Fourth. Labor Day? Don't remind me I work. But Thanksgiving has always struck me as a day unlike the rest. Thanksgiving is different. It is the most significant holiday because it calls on us to do two things: (a)
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | By RICHARD COHEN
Earlier this month in New York City, I listened and watched as some foreign journalists received awards for heroism. They came from places where people are killed for writing the truth, where the switch is thrown on television stations to take them off the air or where newspaper buildings are simply blown up. I was in my tux, sipping wine and eating a fine dinner as the program progressed and thinking - over and over again - how lucky I am to be...
NEWS
December 25, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An inspirational American life in three acts, Antwone Fisher is the true story of a heartbreaking childhood, the courage needed to suture the pieces together, and the confidence required to move ahead. Like those great two-for-the-seesaw weepers Prince of Tides and Good Will Hunting, it is also an exceptional story of a patient who heals his therapist as he himself is healed. Unlike most inspirationals and weepers, this one is set squarely within the African American community.
FOOD
November 22, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
For those of us who love to cook, Thanksgiving is the prince of holidays. After all, it's the one when the big meal is the whole deal - not just the central event but the event, period - a ritual feast in which the food is symbolic of nothing more (or less) than food itself. On the other hand, Thanksgiving has its frustratingly straitjacketish side, innovation and invention being frowned upon. It might be nice, for instance, after the 20th or 30th big bird, to have something besides turkey.
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