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NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
As legalized medical marijuana gains acceptance across the country, a long-smoldering question burns a little hotter. In the vernacular, stoners ask, "Do doobies make boobies?" Plastic surgeons phrase it more scientifically. "Does marijuana cause gynecomastia?" Speculation that men who smoke pot are prone to develop abnormal breast tissue or "man boobs" has been around for decades. The first scientific paper examining the clinical impact of the drug's active ingredient, THC, on hormonal systems was published in 1972 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Jane Miloradovich, For The Inquirer
Three state health departments recently issued warnings about a rise in emergency room visits when people fell seriously ill after using a synthetic drug known as K2 or Spice. The substances are sold as "synthetic marijuana. " A typical urine drug screening cannot detect them. Chemically, they're called THC homologs. Poison centers across the country have been receiving more calls related to these substances. From Jan. 1 through April 29, poison centers received 2,365 calls from people seeking help for adverse reactions to these drugs.
NEWS
March 18, 1999 | By Usha Lee McFarling, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Research indicates that the active ingredients of marijuana can be helpful in treating an array of medical conditions. Here is a summary of findings from recent studies of the medical use of marijuana: Pain relief. Three studies on cancer pain have shown that THC, an active component of marijuana, is as effective as codeine in reducing pain. The studies also showed that THC curbed nausea and enhanced feelings of well-being. Marijuana compounds are most likely to help with problems of chronic pain caused by cancer, nerve damage or AIDS.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Many of the points made in the June 25 editorial "Marijuana on the Table" are well taken, but there are other important issues to consider. First, the much higher potency of the active ingredient, THC, in today's marijuana renders it a powerful drug that can induce significant impairment in motor and cognitive abilities, including those having to with operating a motor vehicle. Secondly, the use of any intoxicating substance is especially problematic in younger people. Full development of the brain does not occur until approximately age 22. Use of mood-altering chemicals by teenagers can have significant adverse consequences on brain development.
NEWS
April 26, 1993 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Because he is infected with the HIV virus that causes AIDS, Bill Hildebrand watched helplessly as his muscular 220-pound body shed 65 pounds in three months last year. The drug he was taking to fight HIV left him nauseated and uninterested in eating. To counter the weight loss, his Center City physician prescribed a pill sold under the trade name Marinol. It contains THC, the active substance in marijuana. "What Marinol does is give me an appetite - and it makes me laugh," said Hildebrand, who has regained 25 pounds.
NEWS
August 23, 1993 | BY NORMAN A. CARTER JR
Many in our society attribute the increase in violent crime to the "Lost Generation" of children. This generation, strung out on narcotics and filled with hate, not only has drained billions of dollars from our national economy, but also has negatively impacted the quality of life of all Americans. Where did these violent idiots come from? This generation of sociopaths, undereducated and seldom employed, are products of the generation before them. They are our children. Not all of the children from this generation (ages 5 to 30)
LIVING
June 26, 2000 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Researchers have found that the active ingredient in marijuana encourages the growth of cancer tumors in mice. The implications in humans are unproven and unclear - although scientists say the study should be a red flag for those who smoke marijuana for medicinal purposes. Some patients smoke marijuana to battle the nausea associated with cancer treatment, or the loss of appetite associated with AIDS. Besides using marijuana regularly, these patients often have weakened immune systems, which the marijuana could weaken further.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | By Tom Webb, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The federal government will phase out its program of providing marijuana cigarettes to new patients with AIDS, cancer or glaucoma, despite claims that smoking the drug eases chronic symptoms of those diseases. Fearing that the program sends mixed signals about drug use - and worried about a rapid increase in demand due to AIDS - officials said yesterday that they are virtually halting new approvals. For a decade, the government has distributed marijuana to a small number of seriously ill patients nationwide.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | By Gen. Barry M. McCaffrey
The 1994 report "Cigarettes, Alcohol, Marijuana: Gateways to Illicit Drug Use," prepared by Columbia University's Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, found that children who used marijuana are 85 times more likely to use cocaine than youngsters who never tried marijuana. In addition, younger individuals who use marijuana heavily are more likely to experiment with other illicit drugs and become addicted as adults. Sixty percent of children who smoke marijuana before age 15 later use cocaine.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware is opening its first medical marijuana dispensary Friday, three years after New Jersey took the leap in the region and allowed this type of business. First State Compassion Center is launching its new cannabis-growing and retail operation inside a former tile warehouse in a Wilmington industrial park. New Jersey has three dispensaries, including one in Egg Harbor Township, near Atlantic City. So far, 340 Delaware residents with qualifying ailments have registered to purchase a maximum of six ounces of cannabis a month, said Emily Knearl, a spokeswoman for the state Division of Public Health.
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NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware is opening its first medical marijuana dispensary Friday, three years after New Jersey took the leap in the region and allowed this type of business. First State Compassion Center is launching its new cannabis-growing and retail operation inside a former tile warehouse in a Wilmington industrial park. New Jersey has three dispensaries, including one in Egg Harbor Township, near Atlantic City. So far, 340 Delaware residents with qualifying ailments have registered to purchase a maximum of six ounces of cannabis a month, said Emily Knearl, a spokeswoman for the state Division of Public Health.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Jane Miloradovich, For The Inquirer
Three state health departments recently issued warnings about a rise in emergency room visits when people fell seriously ill after using a synthetic drug known as K2 or Spice. The substances are sold as "synthetic marijuana. " A typical urine drug screening cannot detect them. Chemically, they're called THC homologs. Poison centers across the country have been receiving more calls related to these substances. From Jan. 1 through April 29, poison centers received 2,365 calls from people seeking help for adverse reactions to these drugs.
NEWS
July 3, 2014 | BY DAVID SACK
IN STATES where medical and recreational cannabis sales are allowed, disquieting new trends and statistics are proving its unique dangers for those most vulnerable to its effects: children. One such statistic is a spike in calls to poison-control centers. According to the National Poison Data System, calls about accidental ingestion of marijuana in children age 9 and younger more than tripled in states that decriminalized marijuana before 2005. In states that enacted legalization from 2005 to 2011, calls increased nearly 11.5 percent per year.
NEWS
January 11, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER During a search of a West Chester University apartment in October, officers uncovered hundreds of pieces of marijuana-laced hard candy wrapped in vacuum-sealed bags and stacked underneath a bed, in a duffel bag, and in a closet, according to a police affidavit released Thursday. Robert Callis-Keiser, 25, of Johnstown, then a university student, was arrested Thursday and released on $25,000 bail, said the Chester County District Attorney's Office. Callis-Keiser, officials said, made the candy.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Kelly April Tyrrell, For The Inquirer
Garrett Brann had his first seizure when he was 6 months old. By age 2, the small, blue-eyed boy who loves trains was having up to 100 each day. Garrett, now 3, has Dravet syndrome, a rare genetic disorder marked by devastating, uncontrollable seizures. The drugs the Harrisburg-area toddler takes to manage them could stop working at any time. It's a hallmark of the disease, which affects about 1 in 30,000 people. His parents are fighting for an option that they say offers a world of hope for their son, but that is not available in Pennsylvania: medical marijuana.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
As legalized medical marijuana gains acceptance across the country, a long-smoldering question burns a little hotter. In the vernacular, stoners ask, "Do doobies make boobies?" Plastic surgeons phrase it more scientifically. "Does marijuana cause gynecomastia?" Speculation that men who smoke pot are prone to develop abnormal breast tissue or "man boobs" has been around for decades. The first scientific paper examining the clinical impact of the drug's active ingredient, THC, on hormonal systems was published in 1972 in the New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER More than 40 pounds of marijuana-laced hard candy - in every color of the rainbow and in sizes ranging from a marble to a small orange - was seized last week from a West Chester University apartment, prosecutors said. The candy, found wrapped in plastic bags for distribution, were intended for college students, not children, Chester County Deputy District Attorney Patrick Carmody said Monday. He said the timing of the bust was likely a coincidence but still was a concern considering its proximity to Halloween.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Christie returned a medical marijuana bill to the Legislature Friday with recommended changes, saying he supports legalizing edible forms of marijuana and additional strains better suited to minors but rejecting a provision that would decrease the number of physician referrals required for a minor's entry into the program. Christie said he would sign the bill if the Legislature makes two changes: specify that the edible form of the drug be given only to minors and require multiple doctors' referrals for minors.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's now up to Gov. Christie to decide whether he wants to amend the state's medical marijuana law and regulations - the strictest in the country - to make it easier for severely sick children to use the drug. The New Jersey Assembly overwhelmingly passed a bill Monday, days after the Senate passed identical legislation, that would streamline the approval process and allow children to use an edible strain of cannabis that does not get them high. No child in New Jersey has legally received cannabis, according to the Assembly bill, though children are eligible under the state's three-year-old medical marijuana law. The parents who pushed for the legislation tried to see the governor after the vote, accompanied by Assemblywoman Linda Stender (D., Union)
NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Kristen Wyatt, Associated Press
DENVER - Angeline Chilton says she can't drive unless she smokes pot. The Denver-area woman says she would never get behind the wheel right after smoking, but she does use medical marijuana twice a day to ease tremors caused by multiple sclerosis that previously left her homebound. "I don't drink and drive, and I don't smoke and drive," she said. "But my body is completely saturated with THC. " Her case underscores a problem that no one's sure how to solve: How do you tell if someone is too stoned to drive?
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