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Thelma Louise

ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
A true detective, declares Kathleen Turner in the truly defective V.I. Warshawski, has to go beyond the obvious. And, she might have added, so does a detective movie. It may have seemed to the makers of V.I. Warshawski that they were venturing beyond the obvious by adding to a summer film season that has put gender on the agenda. Just as Thelma & Louise drives through and over the hitherto jealously guarded male turf of the road movie, Turner ventures into the traditionally man's world of jaded machismo and five-alarm burn-out that is the private-eye movie.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
The nominations for the 49th annual Golden Globe awards in film contained zero surprises. No out-of-left-field nods to the Pia Zadoras of the world, no grotesque overabundance of nominations for bad movies whose studios threw great parties for the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Which is kind of a shame, really, as the goofball nominations were always the most interesting things about the Golden Globes, aside from their value as early indicators of how the Oscar race might shape up. The 1991 nominations, gleaned from a movie year that most everyone agrees was worse than usual, should not only be in tune with most members of the academy's tastes, but are unusually in step with the tougher critics' opinions this time around.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Having examined the many entries for the official Brad Pitt Movie Quiz, we can now understand why Pitt needed armed weightlifters to keep fans out of his hair during the "Twelve Monkeys" shoot. Fanatical devotees swamped the Daily News with entries that displayed a keen - you might say disturbing - interest in the young career of young Brad. Pitt-o-philes had little trouble with our quiz (winners get a "Legends of the Fall" poster), often augmenting their answers with supplemental Pitt trivia.
NEWS
July 26, 1991 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
It's always amazed me that manufacturers can take a product perfectly suitable for both genders, color it pink and put the word "lady" in front of it, and make a zillion dollars selling it to women. It's worked with golf balls, disposable razors, and this year Hollywood is trying it with movies. First, it put two women in an outlaw buddy movie, which became "Thelma & Louise. " Now, Kathleen Turner gets to play a tough-guy detective in "V.I. Warshawski. " Warshawski is a private eye modeled after the Raymond Chandler archetype.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1992 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Two cuties in a convertible, streaking off in search of America - and themselves. Yes, Leaving Normal begins promisingly. And yes, its pairing of a brittle, man-hating waitress and a fragile, runaway housewife is likely to remind viewers of Thelma & Louise. Alas, Leaving Normal, provocatively cast with Christine Lahti as tough cookie Darly and Meg Tilly as marshmallow Marianne, plays out like Darly and Marianne's Excellent Adventure. Perhaps this shouldn't be a surprise, because the screenwriter is Edward Solomon, co-creator of the excellent Bill and Ted movies and a guy whose rude humor does not naturally lend itself to a sensitive story of gals on the road.
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Since everybody knows the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is full of beans (probably decaf espresso), the Daily News recruited its own academy to pick the winners in the top categories of the 64th annual Oscars. Not a bunch of has-been stars or retired lighting technicians, but seven Philadelphians with a real passion for movies - ranging from a film student to a movie house usher. Here are the Daily News Academy's choices for Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Picture from the pool of Oscar nominees.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Cars in movies are like stars in movies. We don't gasp when extraordinary cars do extraordinary things. We cheer when ordinary cars do them. Consider the turbocharged Mitsubishi Spyder in 2 Fast 2 Furious as it zooms from zero to 120 in 10 seconds. Yawn. Now behold the itty-bitty Mini Coopers in The Italian Job as they snake into drainage pipes and subway tunnels. Yowza! A muscle car breaking 100 is like Arnold Schwarzenegger hoisting 200. That's what they're built for. A minuscule car boldly zipping where no vehicle has gone before is like Reese Witherspoon scaling Everest in spike heels.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Gun in Betty Lou's Handbag" is a curious attempt to splice a breezy screwball comedy to ideas borrowed from a Charles Bronson "Death Wish" fantasy. The results are not always good, as when a meek female librarian wings a sadistic killer and says, "That felt good. " Where in God's name did that come from? Probably from a studio executive who'd seen "Thelma & Louise," and who wanted some of that feminist-pandering cash money for his ownself. If you wanted to squeeze the characters of Thelma and Louise into one person, the first thing you'd need are two first names.
NEWS
February 3, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Boys on the Side" combines the sisterly, road-movie solidarity of "Thelma & Louise" with the soapy pathos of "Beaches" in one mighty attempt to create a women's movie colossus for the '90s. The movie takes us on the road with an unwed mother (Drew Barrymore), a lesbian (Whoopi Goldberg) and . . . well, I can't say, but it's Mary-Louise Parker playing a character with a secret that places her (like her pals) near the bottom of Newt Gingrich's list of funding priorities. The story begins as ultra-square white girl Robin (Parker)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2012 | By Luaine Lee, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
PACIFIC PALISADES, Calif. - Sometimes a role in a movie can change an actor's whole career. Sometimes it can change a life. That's what happened to Geena Davis when she costarred in A League of Their Own and learned to play baseball. "It had a massive impact on me because growing up I was tall and gangly, and I didn't want to try sports because I was too physically embarrassed," she says over breadsticks and iced tea in a pizzeria here. "I did it well enough to pull it off in the movies.
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