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Thelonious Monk

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NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pianist Danilo Perez says he hated Thelonious Monk's music when he first heard it in 1986. "This guy was playing a lot of wrong notes," Perez recalled thinking during a brief Q&A at his concert Saturday night at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater. Perez also cited a conversation with the late trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie who said, "We'd take Monk to a jam session, and no one wanted to sit in. " Like much of humanity, Perez got over that, and Saturday night's double set with bassist John Patitucci and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington paid righteous tribute.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
1TSF JAZZ Woody Allen could pull a great soundtrack from this vintage-minded Parisian jazz station. It celebrates the likes of Django Reinhardt, Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk and Fats Waller, plus newbies like Philly's own Melody Gardot. 2KCRW ECLECTIC 24 Hipsters rejoice! A wonderfully curated mashup of new pop-musical forms and talent. Could make you a convert even if you claim to "hate" electronic, hip-hop, world music and alt-country. 3 BBC RADIO 3/BBC 6 The former focuses on classical music by day, plus jazz, world music and fine arts by night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It took Thelonious Monk, the iconoclastic pianist and protean jazz composer who died in 1982, to expose the flaws in the mighty Wynton Marsalis tribute machine. With its angular leaps and scurrying chases, Monk's music forces improvisers to abandon the cherished licks that constitute much post-bop improvisation. Its unorthodox, stair-stepping melodies demand to be picked apart, or at least paraphrased. Its harmonic schemes have their own internal logic, a code that, once cracked, unleashes a stream of possibilities - inverted themes and unlikely, misfit declarations.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Given his monumental place in the jazz pantheon, it simply isn't possible to pick up a tenor saxophone without stepping into the shadow of John Coltrane. How much greater must the pressure be, then, when you share not only his instrument but also his last name? Ravi Coltrane has admirably avoided such outsize expectations by simply following his own muse. He doesn't ignore his heritage. His set list often includes tunes by father John or mother Alice (herself a pioneering pianist)
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, FOR THE INQUIRER
Before playing a single note, before even sitting down at the keyboards at World Cafe Live on Thursday night, Robert Glasper's first order of business was to ask for the stage lights to be dimmed. "We like it kind of sexy," he insisted. Vibe and atmosphere are all-important to the Robert Glasper Experiment. The quartet, which serves as the electric complement to Glasper's slightly more traditional acoustic trio, exists as a permanent jam session, tackling every tune with a sprawling, exploratory looseness.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1994 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The name is Thelonious Monk Jr., but he is no chip off the old block. To distinguish himself from his father and establish an identity that is truly his own, Monk goes by the name T.S. Monk. After disassociating himself from jazz through the '70s and '80s - generally snubbing his rich heritage - Monk, at 43, has now joined the ranks of jazz's more interesting "newcomers" and will be headlining the Saturday segment of this weekend's free Jazz on the Waterfront festival at Penn's Landing.
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NORMAN GADSON bought John Coltrane's old house in Strawberry Mansion in 2004 from Mary "Cousin Mary" Alexander, a relative of the jazz saxophonist. Not long after, he'd call up musicians in the city and ask them to come over to jam in 'Trane's house. Lenora Early, Gadson's widow, said her husband, a fervent jazz fan, intended to fix up the house and open it as a jazz venue. "He just loved jazz," Early said of Gadson. But he died in 2007, before he could restore the house, on 33rd Street near Oxford.
NEWS
August 7, 2011
The Life and Legend of the Jazz Baroness David Kastin W.W. Norton. 273 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Steven Rea She was a Rothschild, raised in sheltered splendor on an English estate, sent to a posh Paris finishing school. She was a decorated war hero, driving ambulances across the North African deserts for the Free French Forces. She was the woman in whose Fifth Avenue apartment Charlie Parker, the great jazz saxophonist, died. And she was the dramatic, black-haired diva of the New York nighclub scene who was busted in New Castle, Del., on drug charges while the passenger in her silver Bentley, the pioneer modern jazz pianist Thelonious Monk, was being beaten by the cops and hauled off to jail.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a jazz man's adage, attributed variously to Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Miles Davis, that goes something like this: "There are two kinds of music, the good and the bad. I play the good kind. " Don Was, the bass player, producer, bandleader, songwriter, and now president of the storied jazz label Blue Note Records, divides the world differently. "There are two kinds of music," Was says. "Generous music and selfish music. " Was was talking from his home in Los Angeles as he got ready to head to Philadelphia to for the Non-Commvention, the national gathering of mostly public radio non-commercial music stations, hosted annually by WXPN (88.5 FM)
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NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
There's a jazz man's adage, attributed variously to Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and Miles Davis, that goes something like this: "There are two kinds of music, the good and the bad. I play the good kind. " Don Was, the bass player, producer, bandleader, songwriter, and now president of the storied jazz label Blue Note Records, divides the world differently. "There are two kinds of music," Was says. "Generous music and selfish music. " Was was talking from his home in Los Angeles as he got ready to head to Philadelphia to for the Non-Commvention, the national gathering of mostly public radio non-commercial music stations, hosted annually by WXPN (88.5 FM)
NEWS
March 15, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
NORMAN GADSON bought John Coltrane's old house in Strawberry Mansion in 2004 from Mary "Cousin Mary" Alexander, a relative of the jazz saxophonist. Not long after, he'd call up musicians in the city and ask them to come over to jam in 'Trane's house. Lenora Early, Gadson's widow, said her husband, a fervent jazz fan, intended to fix up the house and open it as a jazz venue. "He just loved jazz," Early said of Gadson. But he died in 2007, before he could restore the house, on 33rd Street near Oxford.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
1TSF JAZZ Woody Allen could pull a great soundtrack from this vintage-minded Parisian jazz station. It celebrates the likes of Django Reinhardt, Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk and Fats Waller, plus newbies like Philly's own Melody Gardot. 2KCRW ECLECTIC 24 Hipsters rejoice! A wonderfully curated mashup of new pop-musical forms and talent. Could make you a convert even if you claim to "hate" electronic, hip-hop, world music and alt-country. 3 BBC RADIO 3/BBC 6 The former focuses on classical music by day, plus jazz, world music and fine arts by night.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Before playing a single note, before even sitting down at the keyboards at World Cafe Live on Thursday night, Robert Glasper's first order of business was to ask for the stage lights to be dimmed. "We like it kind of sexy," he insisted. Vibe and atmosphere are all-important to the Robert Glasper Experiment. The quartet, which serves as the electric complement to Glasper's slightly more traditional acoustic trio, exists as a permanent jam session, tackling every tune with a sprawling, exploratory looseness.
NEWS
January 16, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Given his monumental place in the jazz pantheon, it simply isn't possible to pick up a tenor saxophone without stepping into the shadow of John Coltrane. How much greater must the pressure be, then, when you share not only his instrument but also his last name? Ravi Coltrane has admirably avoided such outsize expectations by simply following his own muse. He doesn't ignore his heritage. His set list often includes tunes by father John or mother Alice (herself a pioneering pianist)
NEWS
August 7, 2011
The Life and Legend of the Jazz Baroness David Kastin W.W. Norton. 273 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Steven Rea She was a Rothschild, raised in sheltered splendor on an English estate, sent to a posh Paris finishing school. She was a decorated war hero, driving ambulances across the North African deserts for the Free French Forces. She was the woman in whose Fifth Avenue apartment Charlie Parker, the great jazz saxophonist, died. And she was the dramatic, black-haired diva of the New York nighclub scene who was busted in New Castle, Del., on drug charges while the passenger in her silver Bentley, the pioneer modern jazz pianist Thelonious Monk, was being beaten by the cops and hauled off to jail.
NEWS
November 15, 2010 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pianist Danilo Perez says he hated Thelonious Monk's music when he first heard it in 1986. "This guy was playing a lot of wrong notes," Perez recalled thinking during a brief Q&A at his concert Saturday night at the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater. Perez also cited a conversation with the late trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie who said, "We'd take Monk to a jam session, and no one wanted to sit in. " Like much of humanity, Perez got over that, and Saturday night's double set with bassist John Patitucci and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington paid righteous tribute.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Near the end of his first set Wednesday at the Zellerbach Theatre, after his sextet had restated the melody of Thelonious Monk's "Four in One" and was ready to send it home, Wynton Marsalis stepped up to the microphone looking like he had some unfinished business. The acclaimed trumpeter, who had charmed the capacity crowd with self-deprecating wit and nuggets of jazz wisdom, sounded suddenly aggressive. Where he had previously tried to capture the capricious spirit of Monk, he was now in a technician's overdrive, cleanly fingering a chorus of perfectly manicured double-time bebop, barely even stopping to breathe.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1999 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The day before he won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Piano Competition last weekend, Eric Lewis arose at 5 a.m. and found a grand piano in the darkened bar of the Doyle Washington Hotel. Lewis went at the keyboard for more than 3 1/2 hours before attending breakfast. "I was focusing on last-minute laundry," Lewis, 26, said yesterday. "I'd prepared myself for bear. " The prodigy from the Parkside section of Camden had come too far to leave anything to chance. Lewis was a Monk semifinalist at age 16. Now a veteran of bands led by trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and singer Cassandra Wilson, he was one of 12 to reach the semifinals on Saturday.
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