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Thermostat

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FOOD
October 3, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Homeowners know money spent on "smart" thermostats can save many heating dollars at relatively low cost. But, there's one problem - too many to choose from. Computerized, programmable, solid state, energy-efficient - there are hundreds of thermostats on the market, all claiming to apply the latest technology. Faced with all this sophistication, it's sometimes harder to remember that an automatic thermostat's job is essentially a very simple one: to turn down the heating or cooling system when it's not needed and back on when it is. Keeping that in mind can help you save money and avoid some pitfalls when you go about selecting a thermostat.
NEWS
December 13, 2005 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scene: Exterior. Frost on the windows, snow on the ground, the Northeast Philadelphia home of Maryann and Morris Holender. Switch to: Interior. Maryann, 58, and Morris, 59, stage center. A much-abused thermostat on the wall behind them. Maryann (matter-of-factly): I would like the temperature around 65 degrees, but Morris likes it around 60 . . .. Morris (interrupting): No, no, no. Sixty-two is fine. You know The 700 Club on TV? Maryann wants to join the 300 club. That's the $300 gas-bill club.
REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 2013 | By Joanne McLaughlin, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE EDITOR
In winter, my parkside property has a stark beauty. Male cardinals perch vibrantly red on bare tree branches. Tall grasses sway, bleached of their summertime green to a pale wheat color. On a recent frost-dusted day, a tiny black-and-white bird sat under the snow-covered overhang of my front-yard feeder. Outside, a calm had descended. Inside, well, it was pretty darn chilly. Not absolute-zero frigid, just cold enough to merit two pairs of socks, fuzzy slippers, two shirts, a cardigan, and a down vest.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: Last month, I purchased a 1998 Dodge Grand Caravan. Tire size on the vehicle is P215/65R15. My questions: Is this the only tire size I can use on the vehicle? Why can't I use a P215/70R15? Answer: For practical purposes, P215/65R15 is the only tire size you can use on this van and still get accurate speedometer and odometer readings. If you use the P215/70R15 (which was specified for the 1998 all-wheel-drive Caravan), you would need a speedometer calibrated for that larger tire.
NEWS
January 11, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Programmable thermostats are designed to reduce heating and cooling costs by helping you customize and set room temperature automatically. Here's how to tell what might work best for you. To gain the EPA's Energy Star rating, thermostats must be pre-programmed when they leave the factory, Burke says, to ensure that the units save energy by offering four settings that try to anticipate when it is convenient for users to scale back on heating or...
BUSINESS
June 7, 1995 | By Cynthia Mayer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don't bother to touch that dial - not if you're low-income and behind on your gas payments, that is. Philadelphia Gas Works officials say they are devising a thermostat that can't be set above 68 degrees, and will begin installing them in a pilot group of 100 customer homes next winter. PGW wants to target customers who have defaulted on their bills, yet continue to use profligate amounts of gas in winter months. "We get indications from people who go out and do collections (of unpaid bills)
NEWS
September 21, 2000 | Wall Street Journal
When home-furnishing retailer Ikea polled consumers about why they'd want to work at home, they got some surprising results. Sixteen percent of men, but only 4 percent of women, mentioned spending more time with their kids. And 23 percent of all respondents said they'd be happy to avoid office birthday celebrations. The top five reasons ranged from the germ-phobic to the phlegmatic: Avoid having to use a communal bathroom 68% Many living expenses become tax-deductible 54% Avoid feeling fatter than others in office 43% Ability to nap during day 37% Control of thermostat and office cleanliness 26%
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Question: I own a 1988 Ford Ranger pickup with 123,000 miles on it. I use it for work and take it off-road from time to time when I go hunting and fishing. Recently, I've noticed a vibration coming from somewhere in the back. It starts around 25 m.p.h. and then goes away before I hit 35. Balancing the rear wheels didn't help. Do you have any thoughts on what it might be? Answer: I think it is a balance problem. And since you have ruled out wheel imbalance, I think we should issue an arrest warrant for your driveshaft.
NEWS
May 16, 1994 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services, the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal contributed to this report
BLOWING COOL AIR: Surprise your friends. Get the home cooling maintenance stuff done before sweating season. FOR CENTRAL AIR UNITS: Figure on paying a pro between $35 and $40 to start things up by cleaning the condenser and checking the filters, belts and freon level. (For fear of getting zapped with 230 volts or worse, do not attempt any of this yourself, the AC experts at the Orleans Technical Institute on Rhawn Street advise.) FOR WINDOW UNITS: Install at a slight tilt to insure proper drainage.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2011
THE GIZMO: We're tracking two stories with a common theme - established tech companies plunging into new product categories. First, there's Verizon and Comcast's entry into home automation/security services. Then, Sony's first tablet computers. WELCOME TO JETSON-VILLE: Buoyed by research showing consumer interest in home automation, Comcast and Verizon are introducing services that make you master of your domain. In a recent demonstration of the forthcoming Verizon Home Monitoring and Control system, actors demonstrated what you'll soon be able to do in real life.
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REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 2013 | By Joanne McLaughlin, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE EDITOR
In winter, my parkside property has a stark beauty. Male cardinals perch vibrantly red on bare tree branches. Tall grasses sway, bleached of their summertime green to a pale wheat color. On a recent frost-dusted day, a tiny black-and-white bird sat under the snow-covered overhang of my front-yard feeder. Outside, a calm had descended. Inside, well, it was pretty darn chilly. Not absolute-zero frigid, just cold enough to merit two pairs of socks, fuzzy slippers, two shirts, a cardigan, and a down vest.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2011
THE GIZMO: We're tracking two stories with a common theme - established tech companies plunging into new product categories. First, there's Verizon and Comcast's entry into home automation/security services. Then, Sony's first tablet computers. WELCOME TO JETSON-VILLE: Buoyed by research showing consumer interest in home automation, Comcast and Verizon are introducing services that make you master of your domain. In a recent demonstration of the forthcoming Verizon Home Monitoring and Control system, actors demonstrated what you'll soon be able to do in real life.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens
Nature doesn't appear willing to cut consumers a break. Neither does the economy. Longer, colder winters turn quickly into prolonged, hotter summers. To add insult to injury, it seems to be happening while the cost of energy is skyrocketing. This week's 90-degree-plus days tested the endurance of even those who thrive on sultry weather. As household electric meters spin at warp speed, how can you rein in energy costs and remain as comfortable as possible? "My first response would be to add insulation to ensure a well-sealed house, but if homeowners cannot manage it in the middle of a heat wave, I understand," said Ronnie Kweller, a spokeswoman for the nonprofit Alliance to Save Energy in Washington.
NEWS
July 30, 2010 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Question: We have to replace our 30-year-old kitchen linoleum flooring. This floor is also in the back hall as well as the powder room. My husband and I have been having discussions as to what type of flooring we should get. He does not want tile of any sort as he says it is breakable and difficult to put down. We will be using a contractor to install any new flooring. There is a possibility we would be selling the house within five years. I would like a floor that is nice, contemporary, and durable, and will look good if and when we sell the house.
LIVING
January 23, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
I am staring at the living-room sofa. Its upholstery, once a glamorous off-white, looks suspiciously grungy and gray, and its cushions seem terminally flattened. The coffee table in front of the sofa bears the scars of a grandson's recent spirited game of "Army" with his brother (during which the table served handily as a fort). The plants by the back windows are droopy, yearning for more hours of daylight. It must be January, the season of my annual domestic discontent.
LIVING
January 11, 2008 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Programmable thermostats are designed to reduce heating and cooling costs by helping you customize and set room temperature automatically. Here's how to tell what might work best for you. Need to know: Increasingly complex and sophisticated heating, cooling and ventilation systems - especially those with more-efficient variable-speed fans - require correctly matched programmable thermostats, says Tim Burke, director of strategic marketing for...
LIVING
October 26, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Our daughter has a heat pump and air-conditioning unit in her house. She has been given two different comments regarding installing a programmable thermostat. One service person has told her she cannot use a programmable thermostat with a heat pump. Yesterday, the serviceman told her she could. What is the correct answer: Can a programmable thermostat be used with a heat pump/air conditioner combination? Answer: Good question. According to the Department of Energy, programmable thermostats are generally not recommended for heat pumps.
NEWS
December 13, 2005 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Scene: Exterior. Frost on the windows, snow on the ground, the Northeast Philadelphia home of Maryann and Morris Holender. Switch to: Interior. Maryann, 58, and Morris, 59, stage center. A much-abused thermostat on the wall behind them. Maryann (matter-of-factly): I would like the temperature around 65 degrees, but Morris likes it around 60 . . .. Morris (interrupting): No, no, no. Sixty-two is fine. You know The 700 Club on TV? Maryann wants to join the 300 club. That's the $300 gas-bill club.
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