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Thesis

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NEWS
August 1, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Jonathan Coull, winning the award from the Pennsylvania Association of Graduate Students for best graduate thesis was an honor, sure. But getting to the awards ceremony at Bloomsburg University in June was a real challenge. Coull, who will receive his master's degree in Holocaust and Genocide Studies from West Chester University later this summer, had sold his Honda to pay his expenses. He ended up having to beg a ride from a friend who delivers pizzas. "The stereotype of a starving graduate student, that's pretty much him," said one of his professors, William Hewitt.
NEWS
April 26, 1987 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
It's thesis time for many college seniors in the area. Some students are just finishing the typing and editing of the projects that may represent the best work of their college careers. A few students are just beginning the writing. For them, the work will be done when the paper is handed in. Tara O'Keefe, a Bryn Mawr College senior, has typed and edited, and her "paper" is finished. But for her, the final step is not handing it over to a professor. Tara's work will be done when the applause dies down after the last performance, for she was to see her thesis, a play called Shanachie, performed Friday, Saturday and next Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in Goodhart Hall on the Bryn Mawr College campus.
NEWS
November 7, 1994
Long after the petty TV ads, the tit-for-tat sniping, the who's-tougher-on-crime rhetoric of these midterm elections has faded, the book's message will echo in the land. It's title is The Bell Curve. And it purports to be a no-holds-barred examination of intelligence and class structure in American life. In the end, it may have more impact - or consume more attention, at least - than all this year's campaigns put together. There is a reason for that. The book comes at a time of anger and angst, when an electorate is casting about for what went wrong - at a time when government seems inadequate to the task, and when theories that might otherwise be dismissed seem suddenly due respectful hearing.
LIVING
November 9, 1993 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mark S. Guralnick - erstwhile journalist, part-time college instructor, dissatisfied lawyer - riffled papers anxiously, trying hard to hang on to his air of casual command. He'd gone over his work countless times, knew it cold, but in this last half hour of preparation, the dissertation committee assembling soon, his usual assurance was deserting him. Why hadn't he rehearsed better? Why hadn't he re-read every last page of the thesis? What if he couldn't remember exactly what he'd written?
LIVING
March 25, 1993 | By Dennis Romero, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The concluding line in such tales of success always seems to be, I never would have imagined . . . That's not Wendy Kopp's story. "I imagined exactly this," says Kopp, seated in her 33d-floor office that overlooks Manhattan's Radio City Music Hall. With a senior thesis - a simple idea, really - this Princeton graduate helped rekindle an interest in education and public service. The concept was to grab recent college graduates, exchange the standard year or so of teacher certification for a few months of mental boot camp, and send them to teach at inner-city and rural public schools that have teacher shortages.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia-area psychologist has alleged in federal court that a leading professor at the University of Pennsylvania pirated a survey she developed and made more than $1 million on it. The survey is designed to predict the likelihood that someone will succeed at a specific job. In a suit filed Thursday in U.S. District Court, Mary Anne Layden alleges that Martin E.P. Seligman, a well-known Penn professor of psychology, "misappropriated" a...
NEWS
June 2, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Sandra Schulberg was last in college, Richard Nixon was president, The Godfather was in theaters, and Atari had come out with its first generation of video games. But turns of fortune - both bad and good - prevented the then-Swarthmore College undergraduate from finishing the senior thesis needed to earn her bachelor's degree in anthropology. Over the last 36 years, Schulberg - niece of Budd Schulberg, who wrote the screenplay for On the Waterfront, and daughter of the late Stuart Schulberg, once the producer of the Today show - has become an accomplished independent filmmaker, albeit without that bachelor's degree.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from Reuters
Gary Owen Hughes came to Philadelphia seven years ago with pearl-like diction and the most golden of credentials: a doctorate from Oxford University and a dissertation that sparkled. But when editors for a massive Pennsylvania colonial history project read rough drafts he produced on the job, they were worried. The writing was nowhere as good as the thesis. They studied the essays more closely and drew an awful conclusion: Hughes' work was patched together from other sources - stolen goods.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | By Stephen Seplow INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Stow, who teaches history at La Salle University, still remembers the tall, gangly kid in his course on ancient Greece and Rome about 25 years ago. He sat in the back of the room, hardly said anything, and never took a note. "I wondered how is this guy going to survive," Stow recalled yesterday. "And then I gave my first blue-book exam. It was the most amazing, thorough, probing and insightful blue-book exam that I have ever read. " The student was William Joseph Burns Jr. of Carlisle, Pa., and he is going to need all those smarts and more in his new assignment: President Bush's special envoy to the Middle East.
SPORTS
February 9, 2000 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Former Episcopal Academy standout Page Pearcy is winding down a formidable four-year career as a diver for the Princeton women's swimming team. She is one of 13 seniors on the squad, the largest group to graduate since the university began admitting women 28 years ago. "This group will go down as the most talented and special class of swimmers and divers in school history," according to coach Susan Teeter. Pearcy, a high school all-American diver when she was at Episcopal, is now preparing for the Ivy League championships scheduled for Feb. 24-26 at Harvard University.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
October 23, 2015 | Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
Leave it to a Canadian to put a positive spin on SNAP (a.k.a. food stamps), a program whose ungainly full name is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program . "We don't have food stamps in Canada. A lot of Americans don't appreciate that the program is actually really cool and effective," says Leanne Brown , author of Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4 a Day (Workman). She'll discuss the book and sign copies Tuesday, Oct. 27 at the Free Library of Philadelphia . The book has become an unlikely phenomenon, and the interest in it started before it was officially published in July.
NEWS
May 16, 2014
JOSEPH Spearot sure went to a helluva lot of trouble just to drink beer on Arcadia University's dry campus. Undergrads might be expected to dodge vigilant RAs at the school's historic Grey Towers Castle residence hall by simply stuffing a suitcase with cans of Natty Light. Spearot? He built an entire brewhouse in his organic chemistry classroom, then spent months to obtain permission to "test" his experimental ale on human subjects. It was all part of the chemistry/biology major's unique senior project that also took him to a winery in Australia, the quality-assurance laboratory at Yards Brewery and - next month - a prestigious national brewing conference in Chicago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
The thesis behind David Schulner's An Infinite Ache is that regular folks fall in love, and that they, too, deserve their moment in the spotlight. Or as Charles, the male half of this couple whose entire 50-year relationship and marriage we're about to watch, explains, "I'm just an ordinary guy. Nobody tells us how ordinary people should love. " Theatre Horizon agrees, and indulges Schulner with an utterly run-of-the-mill production. The problems with Schulner's thesis are many. First, no one thinks he's ordinary - and certainly no one who works in a coffeehouse and aspires to be a historian/novelist.
NEWS
January 12, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frederick N. Scatena III, 58, of Philadelphia, an expert on hydrology and land forms whose studies took him across the globe, died Wednesday, Jan. 2, of cancer at his home. For the last 10 years, Dr. Scatena was a professor in the University of Pennsylvania Department of Earth and Environmental Science. He rose to department chair in 2003. At various times and in disparate countries, he worked as a consultant hydrologist and geomorphologist - studying the distribution and movement of water over landforms.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mohan Varughese worked hard for his prized Kawasaki motorcycle. The 23-year-old Bustleton native bought the shiny red Ninja with tips earned as a Center City valet. He got it last summer, just in time for his final year at Penn State Abington, where he was set to graduate Friday with a psychology degree. Monday afternoon, someone else wanted it and killed him over it. Varughese was visiting his girlfriend, a Temple University student, at a house on the 2200 block of North Camac Street, a few blocks north of Temple.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By Mike Newall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mohan Varughese worked hard for his prized Kawasaki motorcycle. The 23-year-old Bustleton native bought the shiny red Ninja with tips earned parking cars at a Center City restaurant. He got it last summer, just in time for his final year at Penn State Abington, where he was set to graduate Friday with a psychology degree. Monday afternoon, someone else wanted it and killed him over it. Varughese was visiting his girlfriend, a Temple University student, at a house on the 2200 Block of North Camac Street, a few blocks north of Temple.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Helen Heydrick Dutcher graduated from Frankford High School in 1935, in the middle of the Great Depression. "She wanted to go to college," daughter Carol Bream said, "but the family didn't have any money. " Yet the dream lasted - for decades. In 1973, 38 years after she left high school, Mrs. Dutcher earned her bachelor's degree. Perhaps more remarkably, in 1988, the year she turned 70, she earned her doctorate. On Thursday, Jan. 13, Mrs. Dutcher, 92, former director of training for nonteaching personnel in the Philadelphia School District, died of a stroke at Twin Maples, a nursing home in Durham, Conn.
NEWS
June 2, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Sandra Schulberg was last in college, Richard Nixon was president, The Godfather was in theaters, and Atari had come out with its first generation of video games. But turns of fortune - both bad and good - prevented the then-Swarthmore College undergraduate from finishing the senior thesis needed to earn her bachelor's degree in anthropology. Over the last 36 years, Schulberg - niece of Budd Schulberg, who wrote the screenplay for On the Waterfront, and daughter of the late Stuart Schulberg, once the producer of the Today show - has become an accomplished independent filmmaker, albeit without that bachelor's degree.
NEWS
March 9, 2005 | By Keith Forrest
We all have unfinished projects. They're a hallmark of any successful life. The only way you can truly stretch the bounds of who you are is to take on a few projects that seem impossible. But beware: A seemingly innocuous pile of documents can soon turn into a parchment beast. My wife, Kris, and I live in the den of two snarling paper creatures. There, sitting side by side in two semisymmetrical stacks on our bedroom floor, lies our unfinished testaments to being overeducated. Kris is haunted by her ponderings about a dead opera composer, some of the ingredients for her thesis in music history at West Chester University in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 7, 2004 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Daniel Smith understands that people think he's strange. After all, the leader of the internationally known cult band the Danielson Famile turned in a life-size quilt shaped like a Subaru sedan as part of his senior thesis project at Rutgers University. The screechy-voiced singer from Clarksboro, Gloucester County, aims to convey the healing message of the Lord - while dressing his family indie-pop band in surgeon's scrubs and nurse's uniforms. And on Friday, when he performs in Philadelphia under the moniker Brother Danielson, he'll be wearing what he calls a "Nine Fruit Tree" made with PVC piping.
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