CollectionsThom Yorke
IN THE NEWS

Thom Yorke

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
In 1993, when Radiohead's first hit, "Creep," ruled the airwaves, few would have bet that the British group behind that mopey slice of grunge-pop would amount to anything more than one-hit-wonder status, let alone one day be among the most popular and acclaimed acts in music. The smart money back then was on Pavement, a bunch of quirky indie rockers from Stockton, Calif., who combined post-punk noise with catchy hooks and highly literate, often inscrutable lyrics. But 10 years later, it is Thom Yorke and his crew of mopey Brits who are headlining a worldwide arena tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1997 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sci-fi Japanimation lit the room's video screens and electronic beats whirred on the sound system Sunday night as the British quintet Radiohead opened its Electric Factory show with "Fitter Happier," the only song on its latest CD, OK Computer, to be sung by . . . a computer. On the track, an eerie, processed voice recites an index of contentment indicators: "more productive, comfortable, not drinking too much, regular exercise at the gym (three days a week), getting on better with your associate employee contemporaries.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
It's difficult after just three or four listens to rate this album, but my initial reaction is that In Rainbows (. . ) is as fine a Radiohead album as I have ever heard. The devoted will be immensely gratified, and converts will be drawn in by all the buzz - and what proves to be bewitchingly ethereal, yet altogether visceral, rock music. The 10-song In Rainbows collapses into one tidy package all the Radioheads we have come to know: folk-rock Radiohead, electronica Radiohead, alt-rock Radiohead, prog-rock Radiohead.
NEWS
August 20, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Radiohead doesn't make rock of the fist-in-the-air, we-are-the-champions variety. Its music lurks and broods in the shadows, and strives for connections more personal than the consensus-minded, big-backbeat attack known to transform a large gathering of strangers into a unified body. Its songs investigate dark-side emotions, rarely rallying the faithful with sloganeering affirmations, or anything as pedestrian as a sing-along. And yet, near the end of "Karma Police," during a spellbinding first encore set Monday night at the Tweeter Center, the quintet encouraged listeners to join lead vocalist Thom Yorke as he repeatedly intoned the song's closing refrain.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Various Artists Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys (Anti- ***1/2) It goes without saying that the double disc Son of Rogues Gallery , a 36-song compendium featuring Keith Richards and Tom Waits, Patti Smith, Michael Stipe and Courtney Love, Johnny Depp, Macy Gray, Dr. John, and many others, is a rambling, shambling affair. The sequel to 2006's Rogues Galley , the current seafaring collection once again has Philadelphia-raised longtime Saturday Night Live musical director and professional eclecticist Hal Willner acting as the musical captain of the ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There's a not a band in the world better at projecting postmillennial unease on a grand scale than Radiohead, the six-man art-rock outfit from Oxford, England, that spent a lovely late-spring evening in Camden on Wednesday making beautifully jittery music. All century long, ever since the career-redefining Kid A in 2000, Radiohead has been turning inward, relying on fractured polyrhythms, ambient textures, and Thom Yorke's elegantly alienated vocals to convey a sense of sublime digital-age anxiety.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Imagine Radiohead without the self-importance, and . . . well, that's more or less impossible. But it's one way to approach the music of Atoms for Peace, which teams Radiohead front man Thom Yorke and producer Nigel Godrich with Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea and percussionist Mauro Refosco. Drummer Joey Waronker, most regularly of R.E.M., rounds out the quintet. Yorke and Godrich started Tuesday's show at the Liacouras Center with guitars at the ready, picking out the clipped rhythms of "Before Your Very Eyes . . . ". But stagehands soon took the guitars away, and Godrich retired to a bank of keyboards - musical and computer - while Yorke concentrated on his dance moves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The work of self-indulgent artistes. Pretentious claptrap. Navel-gazing anti-music copped from Pink Floyd. Experimentation that leads nowhere. And that's just the start. Radiohead, which garnered near-universal praise for 1997's OK Computer, had never before encountered the kind of invective it received last fall for its dense, polarizing Kid A. Many hailed the CD as visionary, but not a few were bewildered. As it tested unusual electronic collages and fractured song forms, burying the voice and trimming back hooks, the musicians once hailed as rock's last original thinkers became an oddity, purveyors of garbled, intentionally impenetrable music.
NEWS
May 5, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What does a rock band like Radiohead mean to the world? The critically revered five-piece from Oxford, England - known for its intense accounts of dislocation and techno-alienation - sells CDs in respectable, though not earth-shattering, numbers. It generates higher-than-average traffic on Internet bulletin boards, with fans endlessly parsing lyrics for hidden meanings. And it does solid business when it performs live, selling its share of T-shirts. Yet those marketplace indicators don't tell half the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Radiohead became one of the biggest rock bands in the world by rarely behaving the way other rock bands do. Thursday night at the Tower Theater, where the experimentalists from Oxford, England, debuted material on a keenly anticipated two-night stand that launched their North American tour, one encore selection was "No Surprises," a pretty ballad about Thom Yorke's favorite subjects: disillusionment and alienation. But of course Radiohead is full of surprises. After first appearing to be a one-hit wonder with 1993's "Creep," the fivesome (Yorke; multi-instrumentalist Jonny Greenwood and his bassist brother, Colin; drummer Phil Selway; and guitarist Ed O'Brien)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Imagine Radiohead without the self-importance, and . . . well, that's more or less impossible. But it's one way to approach the music of Atoms for Peace, which teams Radiohead front man Thom Yorke and producer Nigel Godrich with Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea and percussionist Mauro Refosco. Drummer Joey Waronker, most regularly of R.E.M., rounds out the quintet. Yorke and Godrich started Tuesday's show at the Liacouras Center with guitars at the ready, picking out the clipped rhythms of "Before Your Very Eyes . . . ". But stagehands soon took the guitars away, and Godrich retired to a bank of keyboards - musical and computer - while Yorke concentrated on his dance moves.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Various Artists Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys (Anti- ***1/2) It goes without saying that the double disc Son of Rogues Gallery , a 36-song compendium featuring Keith Richards and Tom Waits, Patti Smith, Michael Stipe and Courtney Love, Johnny Depp, Macy Gray, Dr. John, and many others, is a rambling, shambling affair. The sequel to 2006's Rogues Galley , the current seafaring collection once again has Philadelphia-raised longtime Saturday Night Live musical director and professional eclecticist Hal Willner acting as the musical captain of the ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There's a not a band in the world better at projecting postmillennial unease on a grand scale than Radiohead, the six-man art-rock outfit from Oxford, England, that spent a lovely late-spring evening in Camden on Wednesday making beautifully jittery music. All century long, ever since the career-redefining Kid A in 2000, Radiohead has been turning inward, relying on fractured polyrhythms, ambient textures, and Thom Yorke's elegantly alienated vocals to convey a sense of sublime digital-age anxiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Rock gods Radiohead reign supreme, but new releases from Adele, Lauren Pritchard and Steve Riley also vie for attention. THE FUTURE OF MUSIC: Like its 2007 predecessor "In Rainbows," Radiohead's "The King of Limbs" (TBD Records, B+) is almost as interesting a marketing project as it is an album. The set was first announced in a band Tweet on Valentine's Day. It went on sale - online only at www.thekingoflimbs.com - last Friday, one day earlier than originally planned, priced at $9 in MP3 form and $14 as higher-quality WAV files.
NEWS
August 14, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The title of the final song Radiohead played to finish off its dazzlingly dynamic show at the sold-out Susquehanna Bank Center on Tuesday spoke to the exactitude of the performance that preceded it: "Everything in Its Right Place. " Two hours earlier, Thom Yorke, the lead singer of the quintet from Oxford, England, started off by singing, over a rubbery guitar line in "15 Step," from last year's In Rainbows, "How come I end up where I started? How come I end up where I went wrong?"
NEWS
August 13, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The title of the final song Radiohead played to finish off its dazzlingly dynamic show at the sold-out Susquehanna Bank Center on Tuesday spoke to the exactitude of the performance that preceded it: "Everything In Its Right Place. " Two hours earlier, Thom Yorke, the lead singer of the Oxford, England quintet, started off by singing, over a rubbery guitar line in "15 Step," from last year's In Rainbows, "How come I end up where I started? How come I end up where I went wrong?" Throughout the show, Yorke used his otherworldly voice to circle back on those themes of frustration and disconnection, and sometimes, out and out disaffection, as in "No Surprises," when he sang "Bring down the government/They don't speak for us," and was met with a rousing cheer.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
It's difficult after just three or four listens to rate this album, but my initial reaction is that In Rainbows (. . ) is as fine a Radiohead album as I have ever heard. The devoted will be immensely gratified, and converts will be drawn in by all the buzz - and what proves to be bewitchingly ethereal, yet altogether visceral, rock music. The 10-song In Rainbows collapses into one tidy package all the Radioheads we have come to know: folk-rock Radiohead, electronica Radiohead, alt-rock Radiohead, prog-rock Radiohead.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Radiohead became one of the biggest rock bands in the world by rarely behaving the way other rock bands do. Thursday night at the Tower Theater, where the experimentalists from Oxford, England, debuted material on a keenly anticipated two-night stand that launched their North American tour, one encore selection was "No Surprises," a pretty ballad about Thom Yorke's favorite subjects: disillusionment and alienation. But of course Radiohead is full of surprises. After first appearing to be a one-hit wonder with 1993's "Creep," the fivesome (Yorke; multi-instrumentalist Jonny Greenwood and his bassist brother, Colin; drummer Phil Selway; and guitarist Ed O'Brien)
NEWS
May 5, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What does a rock band like Radiohead mean to the world? The critically revered five-piece from Oxford, England - known for its intense accounts of dislocation and techno-alienation - sells CDs in respectable, though not earth-shattering, numbers. It generates higher-than-average traffic on Internet bulletin boards, with fans endlessly parsing lyrics for hidden meanings. And it does solid business when it performs live, selling its share of T-shirts. Yet those marketplace indicators don't tell half the story.
NEWS
August 20, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Radiohead doesn't make rock of the fist-in-the-air, we-are-the-champions variety. Its music lurks and broods in the shadows, and strives for connections more personal than the consensus-minded, big-backbeat attack known to transform a large gathering of strangers into a unified body. Its songs investigate dark-side emotions, rarely rallying the faithful with sloganeering affirmations, or anything as pedestrian as a sing-along. And yet, near the end of "Karma Police," during a spellbinding first encore set Monday night at the Tweeter Center, the quintet encouraged listeners to join lead vocalist Thom Yorke as he repeatedly intoned the song's closing refrain.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|