CollectionsThomas Eakins
IN THE NEWS

Thomas Eakins

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathleen Foster and Elizabeth Milroy were steeled for rejection when they mounted the steps of a certain South Philadelphia rowhouse back in 1983. Foster, an art historian with a special interest in Thomas Eakins, and Milroy, her assistant, knew the little house held an uncatalogued trove of letters and sketches by the Philadelphia figure painter who died in 1916, as well as photographs of Eakins, his family and his comrades-in-art. They also knew that a succession of scholars, collectors, dealers and museum officials had visited that doorstep over a period of 20 years, hoping for even a glimpse of the stash, only to be turned away.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2001 | BY ANNE R. FABBRI, FOR THE DAILY NEWS
"Thomas Eakins: American Realist," the first full-scale retrospective in 20 years of this great American artist, reveals new discoveries of his working methods that place him with our contemporary artists. More than 200 paintings, drawings, sculpture and photographs, borrowed from public and private collections nationwide, present a new viewpoint of Philadelphia's native son and give us an opportunity to savor gems borrowed from other collections. Thomas Eakins (1844-1916) lived most of his life in Philadelphia in the family house at 1729 Mt. Vernon St. He was the grandson of Irish immigrants; his father was a calligrapher and penmanship teacher at Central High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It rises 16 feet in the air, stretching toward the skylighted ceiling of the studio in Old Tarble Hall on the Swarthmore College campus. It is black and creepy. Skeletal fingers reach out toward anyone passing by. Beheaded bodies rise from the top and disembodied arms float near the center. A foot-long scalpel thrusts out, arming a confident Dr. Samuel Gross, the same Samuel Gross memorialized in Thomas Eakins' great 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic . But in this Swarthmore rendering, Dr. Gross has heft and weight.
SPORTS
July 22, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
First of three parts As he sat in the smoky Arena Athletic Club on North Broad Street the night of April 22, 1898, sketching the scene that would become his last great painting, Thomas Eakins unknowingly was depicting themes - disillusionment, unrest, skepticism - that would resonate in Philadelphia sports throughout the next century and beyond. At the center of the artist's finished product, a brooding boxing tableau he called Between Rounds , a local athlete is about to disappoint a hometown crowd.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By Joseph S. Kennedy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
During the summer of 1882 or 1883, art teacher Thomas Eakins led a group of his students out to Dove Lake on Mill Creek near Bryn Mawr for a swim. When they arrived, both teacher and students stripped and went skinny-dipping in the lake. The swimming was recorded in a series of photographs. A few years later, in 1886, this group nude swim cost Eakins his teaching position and the authority it carried within the Philadelphia art community. Yet the painting that emerged from this excursion, The Swimming Hole (1883)
SPORTS
July 22, 2007 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As he sat in the smoky Arena Athletic Club on North Broad Street the night of April 22, 1898, sketching the scene that would become his last great painting, Thomas Eakins unknowingly was depicting themes - disillusionment, unrest, skepticism - that would resonate in Philadelphia sports throughout the next century and beyond. At the center of the artist's finished product, a brooding boxing tableau he called Between Rounds, a local athlete is about to disappoint a hometown crowd.
NEWS
December 20, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
By now, we expect the seasonal flood of art books that washes over the bookstores every fall to include at least one new volume on Georgia O'Keeffe and more startling revelations about the impressionists. This season delivers that and more - insightful biographies of two important American painters, an informative and thoroughly readable look at the history of art dealing and collecting, and the most unusual and imaginative art book I have ever seen. The last would be The Art Pack by Christopher and Helen Frayling and Ron van der Meer (Alfred A. Knopf, $40)
NEWS
October 10, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Thomas Eakins, Philadelphia's most famous artist, didn't have any children, but he did produce lots of descendants. Forty-three-year-old Patrick Connors is one of them, a member of a Philadelphia cohort of realist painters that stretches back more than a century. Realism is a fact of nature here. It's the heart of Philadelphia art tradition, especially as passed down through generations of students at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. And the heart of realism is illusion, using perspective to create three-dimensional space on a flat surface.
NEWS
November 11, 2006 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Thomas Eakins' masterpiece The Gross Clinic - an iconic painting that is irrevocably identified with Philadelphia, where it was painted more than 125 years ago - is poised for sale by Thomas Jefferson University for a record $68 million to a partnership of the National Gallery of Art in Washington and a new museum planned by Wal-Mart heirs in Arkansas. The university's board of trustees approved details of the sale late yesterday, virtually assuring a controversial departure for what many see as the city's greatest and most emblematic work of art - an enormous canvas depicting a Jefferson surgical amphitheater in bloody mid-operation.
NEWS
October 26, 1993
EAKINS' EXHIBIT WOWS THEM IN ENGLAND If he had been a French painter, or even an English one, every European museum would covet his work. He would be as familiar to collectors, dealers and art students as Manet and Degas. But, although French-trained, Thomas Eakins (1844-1916), was a thoroughly American artist . . . virtually unknown in Europe. His only trace there is a single painting in the Musee d'Orsay, and that was given by an American museum. . . . However, John Hayes, the director of London's National Portrait Gallery . . . recognized Eakins brilliance more than 30 years ago (and)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Gross Clinic , Thomas Eakins' 1875 masterpiece, is back at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, where it hangs when it is not at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The back-and-forth travels of this monumental painting, owned jointly by the two institutions since a dramatic public fund-raising campaign ended in its acquisition in 2006, have almost always been marked by something special: a complete cleaning and restoration of the picture, for instance; or its installation in an unusual setting, such as a 2011 exhibition focusing on the human body at PAFA, where Eakins taught and was famously fired for showing too much of the male anatomy to female art students.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Descendants of the family of Msgr. Patrick Garvey, once rector of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, are challenging the seminary's decision to sell Thomas Eakins' 1902 portrait of Garvey, arguing that the seminary does not own it. Robert E. Goldman, a former federal prosecutor who is aiding the descendants, said the portrait, painted during Eakins' visits to the City Avenue seminary at the turn of the 20th century, was put in the seminary's hands for...
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
St. Charles Borromeo Seminary has entered into an agreement with Christie's to sell five of its most valuable artworks, portraits of clerics by Thomas Eakins. Bishop Timothy C. Senior, the rector of the seminary, announced the agreement Friday. He said it was not yet clear how much the paintings might fetch. The goal is to defray the cost of renovating and consolidating the Wynnewood campus from about 75 acres to 35, to serve an enrollment that is down 75 percent from its peak of 534 in 1960.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
A preliminary plan for the sale of artworks in the collection of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary should be announced by the end of March, seminary officials say. The seminary is home to about 200 paintings, including six portraits of clerics by Thomas Eakins and others by Alice Neel and Philip Pearlstein. The Inquirer reported Monday that the seminary was considering sales from its collection to help defray the costs of consolidation and renovation of its Wynnewood campus on City Avenue.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art and three other U.S. institutions have joined to offer a sweeping survey of historical American art for exhibition in South Korea. Museum officials describe the show, which includes more than 100 works drawn from three centuries of American art making, as the first such major survey in Korea. "Many Koreans are aware of American artists such as Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol, and familiar with post-1960s American art, but not with the work of artists of earlier periods, such as John Singleton Copley, Thomas Cole, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Eakins," Seung-ik Kim, the National Museum of Korea's lead curator for the exhibition and a specialist in Korean modern art and visual culture, said on Wednesday.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
From the pastoral serenity of "Visions of Arcadia" at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, we turn this week to its antithesis, the paintings, drawings, and photographs by Eric Fischl at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.   As with the Arcadians, nudes and semi-nudes predominate in Fischl's work, but there the resemblance ends. Instead of idyllic harmony, Fischl gives us tension, ambiguity, mild — and sometimes explicit — eroticism and the unsettling sense of not being able to figure out what's going on. Fischl has been making such visual provocations since the 1980s, when he became known for suggesting on canvas that suburbia was something less than a white-bread paradise.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Henry Ossawa Tanner deserves a kinder fate than to have a major retrospective of his work sandwiched between Zoe-mania and Vincent van Gogh. But how could it be otherwise? Local photographer Zoe Strauss is emphatically "now" and populist, and van Gogh is a modern master and a perpetual crowd-pleaser. Tanner, by contrast, is a less demonstrative artist whose work reflects the conservative values of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Consequently, his art attracts less attention and requires a more measured response.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
It rises 16 feet in the air, stretching toward the skylighted ceiling of the studio in Old Tarble Hall on the Swarthmore College campus. It is black and creepy. Skeletal fingers reach out toward anyone passing by. Beheaded bodies rise from the top and disembodied arms float near the center. A foot-long scalpel thrusts out, arming a confident Dr. Samuel Gross, the same Samuel Gross memorialized in Thomas Eakins' great 1875 painting, The Gross Clinic . But in this Swarthmore rendering, Dr. Gross has heft and weight.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2011 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
The Independence Seaport Museum's "Drawn to the Water," a gathering of work by dozens of painters from 1830 to the present, connects a multitude of dots. It presents Philadelphia as a city with a great maritime tradition, its waterfront boasting commercial, naval, and recreational boating activities. It shows that the region's waterways have served as a source of inspiration for artists for centuries. And every one of the artists in the show had or has ties to the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the nation's oldest art school and art museum, as a student or faculty member.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|