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Thomas Mellon

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NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas E. Mellon Jr., 65, of Doylestown, a prominent Bucks County lawyer and former federal prosecutor, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, at his home after a lengthy battle with pancreatic cancer. Mr. Mellon won a $6 billion judgment in federal court against al-Qaeda for relatives of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also had leading roles in litigation against the tobacco industry and the makers of fen-phen, the weight-loss drug combination that was found to cause heart-valve damage.
NEWS
December 14, 2000 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A federal magistrate judge yesterday postponed deciding on a motion to disqualify the attorney representing a Cape May County dentist in his wrongful-death lawsuit against the Ford Motor Co. Magistrate Judge Joel Rosen said he would wait until the court-appointed interim legal adviser for dentist Eric Thomas' daughter, Alix, files a report on Jan. 5 on how the girl's interests would best be protected. Attorneys for Ford have asked that lawyer Thomas Mellon be disqualified because he is representing potentially different interests in the case.
NEWS
November 22, 1988 | By Rebecca Barnard, Special to The Inquirer
Jane Mellon Sayen, 74, a Princeton interior designer and a descendant of the Mellon family of Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, died Sunday at the Medical Center at Princeton. As owner of the Princeton Decorating Shop on Palmer Square in Princeton for more than 30 years, Miss Sayen developed a reputation that brought her clients from Europe and the United States, including several major U.S. corporations. She was born in Hamilton Square to philanthopist Frederick Richardson Sayen and Anne Mellon Sayen, great-niece of Pittsburgh financier Thomas Mellon.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime in the next few months, Bucks County Court Judge Robert J. Mellon is going to take off his black robe and go out and find a job. It wasn't supposed to be this way. Mellon, a Republican-turned-Democrat, was appointed to the county bench by Democratic Gov. Casey last year to fill a vacancy until the end of this year. He ran in the primaries in May as the endorsed Democratic candidate, seeking a full 10-year term that would have begun Jan. 1. But he lost in both the Democratic and Republican primaries to Cynthia M. Weaver, a Democrat who recently changed her party registration to Republican.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former public defender Cynthia M. Weaver defeated Bucks County Court Judge Robert J. Mellon for the Democratic nomination to Common Pleas Court and easily won the Republican nomination. Her place on both ballots virtually assures her election in the fall. With more than 80 percent of the vote counted last night, Weaver held a 1,600-vote lead for the Democratic nomination, and a nearly 2-1 edge for the GOP nod. Weaver's victory marks a dramatic upset over Mellon, who was appointed in July by Gov. Casey and whose brother, Thomas, is chairman of the Bucks County Democratic Party.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
When the North Penn Chamber of Commerce's Business Education Council was looking at gaps in the programs it offered, it kept returning to the lack of career opportunities for teenagers. "There were students completing high school and college who wanted to work but didn't have the slightest idea of the work world," said Thomas Mellon Jr., chairman of the council. "We needed to turn that around, and you can't do it with books. " So the council came up with the career line, a computer database that would help students find business people in their field of interest, whom they can then call.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Charles Pukanecz, Special to The Inquirer
When deciding whom to vote for in Tuesday's election, many Bucks County voters were able to rely on personal knowledge of the candidates. Turning to strategies from the past, candidates of both major parties spent a lot of time knocking on doors. "In terms of the effort over the last three months, both by the Democrats and the Republicans, there was a great deal of door-knocking, over-the-fence talking, kaffeeklatsches and that sort of thing that could be called old- fashioned campaigning," said Thomas Mellon, the county Democratic Party chairman.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | By Steve Boman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After working as a high school teacher, a lawyer in the Bucks County Public Defender's Office and a private trial lawyer, Cynthia M. Weaver is aiming for a place on the Bucks County bench. Weaver announced last week that she is running for the judicial seat on the Bucks County Court of Common Pleas now held by Judge Robert E. Mellon. "The expansion of the bench to include members of the bar with different backgrounds is only going to be a plus," Weaver said. "I think the bench could only benefit from having a well-rounded attorney added to it. " Weaver, 44, of Newtown Borough, is hoping to unseat Mellon, who was appointed by Gov. Casey in July to fill the remaining 1 1/2-year term of retiring Judge George T. Kelton.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early this morning when Frank V. Cahouet ascended the elevator to his 40th- floor office and the chairmanship of Mellon Bank Corp., the world as it has been known by Mellon for 118 years ended. Not since Thomas Mellon founded T. Mellon & Sons, Private Bankers in 1869, has an outsider held the chairmanship. That he is the first chairman not born a Mellon or bred a Mellon banker by rising through the ranks may have escaped Cahouet. He has other things on his mind. Cahouet (pronounced COW-et)
BUSINESS
November 9, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
One is a 6-foot-2-inch hulk of a man. Seemingly unflappable and avuncular, he thoughtfully rubs his bald head when considering a question. At his side is a shorter, wiry man with a head of white hair and bushy, jet-black eyebrows. Smoking Merit cigarettes, he sits on the edge of the chair as if poised to spring. Physically, they are an odd pair. Mutt and Jeff come to mind. But after only a few months of working side by side at Mellon Bank Corp., Frank V. Cahouet, 55, chairman and chief executive officer, and Anthony P. Terracciano, 49, president and chief operating officer, exhibit an eerie mental compatibility like that of a couple married many years.
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NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas E. Mellon Jr., 65, of Doylestown, a prominent Bucks County lawyer and former federal prosecutor, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, at his home after a lengthy battle with pancreatic cancer. Mr. Mellon won a $6 billion judgment in federal court against al-Qaeda for relatives of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also had leading roles in litigation against the tobacco industry and the makers of fen-phen, the weight-loss drug combination that was found to cause heart-valve damage.
NEWS
April 22, 2002 | By Amie Parnes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Back in September, Thomas E. Mellon Jr. knew next to nothing about the mysterious man with the turban and stringy beard - only that he was a terrorist. Now, Mellon says, he knows who Osama bin Laden is: the man he is hunting, the man he is suing, the man he plans to defeat. "Someone has got to hold this man responsible," Mellon said, echoing what millions of Americans have said since they learned of bin Laden's involvement in the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon as well as the plane crash in Shanksville, Pa. The Doylestown lawyer has crafted a lawsuit - the third of three filed against the terrorists - on behalf of seven Pennsylvania women: widows Fiona Havlish, Russa Steiner, Clara Chirchirillo, Ellen Saracini, Theresann Lostrangio and Tara Banem and Grace Godshalk, who lost a son on Sept.
NEWS
December 14, 2000 | By Aamer Madhani, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A federal magistrate judge yesterday postponed deciding on a motion to disqualify the attorney representing a Cape May County dentist in his wrongful-death lawsuit against the Ford Motor Co. Magistrate Judge Joel Rosen said he would wait until the court-appointed interim legal adviser for dentist Eric Thomas' daughter, Alix, files a report on Jan. 5 on how the girl's interests would best be protected. Attorneys for Ford have asked that lawyer Thomas Mellon be disqualified because he is representing potentially different interests in the case.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If the temperature on your outdoor thermometer were measured by the present activity level of Bucks County politics, it would probably read a balmy 85 degrees. So put away your rock salt and snow shovels and get ready for the start of a hot election season. Two key, surprise developments this month have presented some exciting prospects for both county Democrats and Republicans: the Jan. 5 decision by Democrat H. Craig Lewis not to seek re-election to his state Senate seat, and the Jan. 12 resignation of Democratic Chairman Thomas E. Mellon Jr. Before Lewis' pronouncement, the Democrats figured that continuing their 20-year control of the Sixth District Senate seat from Lower Bucks would be a formality.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thomas E. Mellon Jr. abruptly resigned last night as chairman of the Bucks County Democratic Party, marking the second major surprise in a week for the floundering organization. The departure of Mellon, effective immediately, follows State Sen. H. Craig Lewis' announcement that he will not seek a sixth consecutive term. The party has just begun scurrying to find a new candidate for Lewis' Lower Bucks district. Mellon said he was quitting because he encountered fierce resistance to his plan to hold special endorsements for a new chairman and vice chairman next month.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | By Frederick Cusick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sometime in the next few months, Bucks County Court Judge Robert J. Mellon is going to take off his black robe and go out and find a job. It wasn't supposed to be this way. Mellon, a Republican-turned-Democrat, was appointed to the county bench by Democratic Gov. Casey last year to fill a vacancy until the end of this year. He ran in the primaries in May as the endorsed Democratic candidate, seeking a full 10-year term that would have begun Jan. 1. But he lost in both the Democratic and Republican primaries to Cynthia M. Weaver, a Democrat who recently changed her party registration to Republican.
NEWS
May 19, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former public defender Cynthia M. Weaver defeated Bucks County Court Judge Robert J. Mellon for the Democratic nomination to Common Pleas Court and easily won the Republican nomination. Her place on both ballots virtually assures her election in the fall. With more than 80 percent of the vote counted last night, Weaver held a 1,600-vote lead for the Democratic nomination, and a nearly 2-1 edge for the GOP nod. Weaver's victory marks a dramatic upset over Mellon, who was appointed in July by Gov. Casey and whose brother, Thomas, is chairman of the Bucks County Democratic Party.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | By Steve Boman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
After working as a high school teacher, a lawyer in the Bucks County Public Defender's Office and a private trial lawyer, Cynthia M. Weaver is aiming for a place on the Bucks County bench. Weaver announced last week that she is running for the judicial seat on the Bucks County Court of Common Pleas now held by Judge Robert E. Mellon. "The expansion of the bench to include members of the bar with different backgrounds is only going to be a plus," Weaver said. "I think the bench could only benefit from having a well-rounded attorney added to it. " Weaver, 44, of Newtown Borough, is hoping to unseat Mellon, who was appointed by Gov. Casey in July to fill the remaining 1 1/2-year term of retiring Judge George T. Kelton.
NEWS
February 16, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
When the North Penn Chamber of Commerce's Business Education Council was looking at gaps in the programs it offered, it kept returning to the lack of career opportunities for teenagers. "There were students completing high school and college who wanted to work but didn't have the slightest idea of the work world," said Thomas Mellon Jr., chairman of the council. "We needed to turn that around, and you can't do it with books. " So the council came up with the career line, a computer database that would help students find business people in their field of interest, whom they can then call.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | By Charles Pukanecz, Special to The Inquirer
When deciding whom to vote for in Tuesday's election, many Bucks County voters were able to rely on personal knowledge of the candidates. Turning to strategies from the past, candidates of both major parties spent a lot of time knocking on doors. "In terms of the effort over the last three months, both by the Democrats and the Republicans, there was a great deal of door-knocking, over-the-fence talking, kaffeeklatsches and that sort of thing that could be called old- fashioned campaigning," said Thomas Mellon, the county Democratic Party chairman.
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