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Threshold

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NEWS
June 17, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Parkesburg is dying," the lady in the supermarket said. That is not exactly like telling Alan Wolfe to reach for his six-guns, but it is close. However, being a peaceable gent, Wolfe did not blaze away. He just introduced himself to the lady in the checkout line. "I happen to be the mayor of Parkesburg," he said, and went into his "threshold of great things" routine. It is a pretty good speech, full of telling details, great expectations and minor exaggerations about the town's future.
NEWS
January 18, 1986 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
An Assembly committee yesterday began the unglamorous and highly technical task of revising New Jersey's auto-insurance system, which inspired some of the most ardent political rhetoric of 1985. Meeting for the first time, the Insurance Committee heard testimony on a proposal to limit the rights of injured motorists to sue for "pain and suffering. " Chairman Ralph A. Loveys (R., Morris) said the state's 13-year-old no-fault law had permitted a steady rise in the number of these lawsuits, instead of reducing them as intended.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
A story in some editions Wednesday incorrectly reported the income threshold for property-tax rebate credits for non-senior, non-disabled homeowners under a Democratic-supported bill vetoed by Gov. Christie. The threshold would have been $100,000. The information was incorrectly reported by the Associated Press. A story Thursday gave the wrong date for an accident in West Goshen Township involving Sean Owen O'Neill. He crashed his car into the garage of a house Nov. 24, 2011.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
LAST WEEK, President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department, based on the nature of the worker's duties and the worker's salary, the presumption being that higher salaries denoted higher-status administrative workers who did not need the same protections as lower-wage production workers (an arguable point)
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Other than a dismissive sound bite from Labor Secretary Tom Perez, who said he is "working overtime" on new overtime rules, there hasn't been much news on an initiative President Obama deemed important enough to tout in his State of the Union address. Earlier, the administration said new rules making more workers eligible for overtime would be announced by February. Then officials said they would be ready in March, and then in the first quarter, which ends today. Now Perez is just sound-biting his way out of setting another deadline.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | By Garth Garrett, Special to The Inquirer
When Mabel McMaster retired in 1975, she vowed to keep her life active and interesting. She learned to ski, did volunteer work at a hospital, and aided abused women when they appeared in court. Then, five years ago, the spry, diminutive 76-year-old woman from Glenolden stumbled on her most fulfilling challenge while attending a conference at Delaware County Community College. Ever since, she has taught decision-making skills to inmates at the Delaware County Prison through a program called Threshold.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
More than half the states have raised their minimum wages above the federal rate, while the richest 1 percent have consumed an increasing share of income growth. But little has been done to prop up the stagnant wages of the middle class, whose real wealth is lower than in 1969. It's no coincidence that middle-class incomes have barely improved since the federal government began letting overtime standards lapse in the 1970s. Back then, more than 65 percent of Americans were required to be paid at the overtime rate - 1 1/2 times regular pay - for working more than 40 hours a week.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BROOKLYN - Among the half-dozen Philadelphia composers currently working on operas, the ultra-expressionistic Michael Hersch is the first to see his produced. On the Threshold of Winter was premiered Wednesday in a small-scale production at the Brooklyn Academy of Music by soprano Ah Young Hong and the Nunc contemporary music group - and emerged as something so uncompromising that any future presentation in a traditional opera house is unlikely. Based on Marin Sorescu's 1996 poems written in the weeks before his death from liver cancer, On the Threshold of Winter is a journey into fatal illness that, in Hersch's hands, acknowledges no distance, safe or otherwise, between a listener and the suffering protagonist.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - More than half a million U.S. children are now believed to have lead poisoning, roughly twice the previous high estimate, health officials reported Thursday. The increase is the result of the government last year lowering the threshold for lead poisoning, so now more children are considered at risk. Too much lead can harm developing brains and can mean a lower IQ. Lead poisoning used to be a much larger concern in the United States, but has declined as lead was removed from paint and gasoline and other sources.
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BUSINESS
July 2, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Millions of American employees will become eligible for overtime pay under new regulations proposed by the U.S. Department of Labor. "We anticipate that workers, on an annual basis, will get $1.2 to $1.3 billion in their pockets," U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said during a press call Tuesday. "Other workers," he said, "will have the gift of time. " Perez said the new regulations will particularly apply to salaried low-level managers and supervisors, many of whom, he said, regularly work more than 40 hours - "the manager who was working 20 hours for free under the current rule.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Other than a dismissive sound bite from Labor Secretary Tom Perez, who said he is "working overtime" on new overtime rules, there hasn't been much news on an initiative President Obama deemed important enough to tout in his State of the Union address. Earlier, the administration said new rules making more workers eligible for overtime would be announced by February. Then officials said they would be ready in March, and then in the first quarter, which ends today. Now Perez is just sound-biting his way out of setting another deadline.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
More than half the states have raised their minimum wages above the federal rate, while the richest 1 percent have consumed an increasing share of income growth. But little has been done to prop up the stagnant wages of the middle class, whose real wealth is lower than in 1969. It's no coincidence that middle-class incomes have barely improved since the federal government began letting overtime standards lapse in the 1970s. Back then, more than 65 percent of Americans were required to be paid at the overtime rate - 1 1/2 times regular pay - for working more than 40 hours a week.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
BROOKLYN - Among the half-dozen Philadelphia composers currently working on operas, the ultra-expressionistic Michael Hersch is the first to see his produced. On the Threshold of Winter was premiered Wednesday in a small-scale production at the Brooklyn Academy of Music by soprano Ah Young Hong and the Nunc contemporary music group - and emerged as something so uncompromising that any future presentation in a traditional opera house is unlikely. Based on Marin Sorescu's 1996 poems written in the weeks before his death from liver cancer, On the Threshold of Winter is a journey into fatal illness that, in Hersch's hands, acknowledges no distance, safe or otherwise, between a listener and the suffering protagonist.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
LAST WEEK, President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department, based on the nature of the worker's duties and the worker's salary, the presumption being that higher salaries denoted higher-status administrative workers who did not need the same protections as lower-wage production workers (an arguable point)
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
NEW YORK - More than half a million U.S. children are now believed to have lead poisoning, roughly twice the previous high estimate, health officials reported Thursday. The increase is the result of the government last year lowering the threshold for lead poisoning, so now more children are considered at risk. Too much lead can harm developing brains and can mean a lower IQ. Lead poisoning used to be a much larger concern in the United States, but has declined as lead was removed from paint and gasoline and other sources.
NEWS
December 16, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Signaling new movement in fiscal cliff talks, House Speaker John A. Boehner has proposed raising the top rate for earners making more than $1 million, a person familiar with the negotiations said. President Obama, who wants higher top rates for households earning more than $250,000, has not accepted the offer, this person said. The proposal, however, indicated progress in talks that had appeared stalled. The person would only discuss the plan on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the negotiations.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
A story in some editions Wednesday incorrectly reported the income threshold for property-tax rebate credits for non-senior, non-disabled homeowners under a Democratic-supported bill vetoed by Gov. Christie. The threshold would have been $100,000. The information was incorrectly reported by the Associated Press. A story Thursday gave the wrong date for an accident in West Goshen Township involving Sean Owen O'Neill. He crashed his car into the garage of a house Nov. 24, 2011.
SPORTS
April 7, 2012 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - The $50 million closer yelled, slapped the right hand of the $9 million catcher and pointed at the $18 million third baseman. A win for the $60 million pitcher had been preserved, and another Phillies opening day was complete. Life as spending kings of the National League produces a scene like such: The Phillies, lugging $38 million in 2012 salary on the disabled list, defeated a Pittsburgh Pirates team with a $54 million total payroll. The Phillies will outspend every team in the NL once again, with the next-closest team being about $50 million shy of their payroll.
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