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Thrilla

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LIVING
September 26, 2000 | By Diane Goldsmith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Right after Muhammad Ali's daughter, Laila, launched her boxing career nearly a year ago, a swift challenge came from a member of the Frazier family. "I'll kick her butt," said Joe's daughter, Jacquelyn. In the days of the old rivalry, Ali was the one delivering the verbal jabs - but there was something else unusual about this call to arms. Jacqui Frazier-Lyde was a 210-pound North Philadelphia lawyer, wife, and mother of three, who at 37 hadn't seriously competed in sports since college.
NEWS
June 7, 2016
My admiration for Muhammad Ali wasn't at first sight. You have to understand that when Cassius Clay, which was his name at the time, knocked out Sonny Liston on Feb. 25, 1964, in my 10-year-old mind he was defeating a man admired by little black boys in Alabama like me for his ferociousness in doing the inconceivable: routinely knocking out white men with no fear of being trotted off to jail. It didn't matter that Clay was black too. He was a loud mouth and too good-looking to believe he would hold the heavyweight crown for very long.
NEWS
February 11, 2002 | YONG KIM / DAILY NEWS, DAVID MAIALETTI / Daily News, JENNIFER MIDBERRY / Daily News, DAVID MAIALETTI / Daily News, JENNIFER MIDBERRY / Daily News, DAVID MAIALETTI / Daily News, GEORGE REYNOLDS / Daily News and DAVID MAIALETTI / Daily News
The stars got up close-and-personal yesterday at the NBA All-Star game. Sharing the floor with the All-Stars were: 1. Actor/funnyman Chris Tucker looking subdued. 2. 'N Sync's Justin Timberlake with main squeeze Britney Spears. 3. Chris Kirkpatrick, also of 'N Sync, is almost incognito under the hood and devilish goatee. 4. Samuel L. Jackson and Philadelphia's Patti LaBelle, no strangers to the First Union Center scene, take in the sights. 5. Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier chat, possibly rehashing the "Thrilla in Manilla.
SPORTS
June 19, 1989 | By Tom Mahon, Daily News Sports Writer
The public screamed when Sugar Ray Leonard and Tommy Hearns announced their recent rematch. Two old fighters looking for a payday, they said. The prevailing notion was that old boxers should fade away and leave the fighting to the young bucks with their chiseled bodies and hammer-hard punches. Leonard had knocked out Hearns in the 14th round eight years ago. Who wanted to see a rematch by this two senior citizens? Well, by the time it was over, after the aging gladiators had fought to a draw, the public was still screaming - for a winner.
NEWS
May 18, 2009 | By A.J. THOMSON
AS YOU probably know, HBO has been running an excellent documentary on one of the greatest sporting events of all time: the Thrilla in Manila. For younger readers exposed only to today's ring free-for-alls, or mixed martial arts, the Thrilla was a boxing match where men fought with skill and stamina, not by kicking, biting or scraping their opponents. The documentary is at once a history lesson and another example of what society has lost as the great sport of boxing has collapsed under a legion of ruinous deals and given way to glorified bar brawls in cages.
SPORTS
April 13, 1991 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was everything that the Mike Tyson-Michael Spinks bout was supposed to be - a fight that would last longer than its prescribed limit of 15 rounds, a fight that would last the ages. Before the Muhammad Ali-Joe Frazier match on March 8, 1971, in Madison Square Garden, the great sportswriter Jimmy Cannon wrote, "It figures to be a hell of a fight. " It was that and more - a match between two warriors who brought a passion and energy to the ring that had not been seen before.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Jay Searcy contributed to this report
Former heavyweight boxing champion Joe Frazier was charged with drunken driving yesterday following his arrest earlier in the day in North Philadelphia for traffic violations, police said. Frazier, 54, of Philadelphia, was behind the wheel of a 1989 Jaguar when officers spotted him shortly after 3 a.m. on Allegheny Avenue near Kensington Avenue in the Kensington section of the city driving "in a reckless manner," said Cpl. James Pauley, a police spokesman. Police saw Frazier commit several motor vehicle violations during a period of several minutes before officers pulled him over, authorities said.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | By Leonard N. Fleming and Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
J. Russell Peltz, who is known as a walking encyclopedia of boxing history, kept his most treasured items in his office at 25th and Brown Streets. His collection of pugilisticmemorabilia was valued at $1 million. Today, a portion of that collection - ranked among the best in the world - is in ruins. Peltz, a boxing promoter, and Philadelphia police are trying to determine why the office, in the city's Fairmount section, was firebombed early Friday morning. The fire consumed much of Peltz's secretary's space, where various boxing artifacts were kept.
SPORTS
May 20, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Jacqui Frazier-Lyde, daughter of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, stopped overmatched Norma Galloway at 1:04 of the fourth round last night. Frazier-Lyde improved to 4-0 with the longest fight of her pro career. She knocked out two of her previous opponents in the first round, and stopped the other in the third round. The 38-year-old fighter, based in Philadelphia and trained by brother Marvis, stunned Galloway with a right-left combination that prompted referee Steve Smoger to stop the bout.
SPORTS
January 5, 2000 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
Leave it to boxing to come up with "The Dueling Daughters. " Though nothing is official, promoter Don Elbaum said Jacqui Frazier-Lyde, the daughter of former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier, could square off before the end of the year against Laila Ali, the daughter of you-know-who. In that this fall is the 25th anniversary of the "Thrilla in Manila," a classic prizefight in the annals of the sports, Frazier-Lyde would love to commemorate that historic event by stepping into the ring against Laila.
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NEWS
June 7, 2016
My admiration for Muhammad Ali wasn't at first sight. You have to understand that when Cassius Clay, which was his name at the time, knocked out Sonny Liston on Feb. 25, 1964, in my 10-year-old mind he was defeating a man admired by little black boys in Alabama like me for his ferociousness in doing the inconceivable: routinely knocking out white men with no fear of being trotted off to jail. It didn't matter that Clay was black too. He was a loud mouth and too good-looking to believe he would hold the heavyweight crown for very long.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CITY'S most active historic-preservation group may have to don a pair of boxing gloves now that it has put the Legendary Blue Horizon, the former boxing mecca on North Broad Street, on its 2013 Endangered Properties List. In announcing this year's list of threatened buildings this week, the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia charged that developers planning to convert the Blue into a hotel are breaking a promise to preserve the boxing arena - possibly making it part of a ballroom.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Muhammad Ali, dressed in a black suit and wearing sunglasses, stood nearly motionless Thursday night as he stared down intently at the Liberty Medal that had just been presented to him. The 70-year-old Ali, fighting through his Parkinson's disease, briefly lifted his right hand to acknowledge the sustained standing ovation of the audience on the front lawn of the National Constitution Center. The crowd erupted in a rousing chant: "Ali! Ali! Ali!" The world-champion boxer, antiwar hero, and cultural icon was awarded the 2012 medal for his life as a transformative figure personifying the struggle for liberty.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Muhammad Ali, dressed in a black suit and wearing sunglasses, stood nearly motionless Thursday night as he stared down intently at the Liberty Medal that had just been presented to him. The 70-year-old Ali, fighting through his Parkinson's disease, briefly lifted his right hand to acknowledge the sustained standing ovation of the audience on the front lawn of the National Constitution Center. The crowd erupted in a rousing chant: "Ali! Ali! Ali!" The world champion boxer, antiwar hero, and cultural icon was awarded the 2012 medal for his life as a transformative figure personifying the struggle for liberty.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Boxing legend Muhammad Ali is the winner of the 2012 Liberty Medal, given annually to men, women, and organizations that courageously strive to secure liberty for people around the globe. Ali, 70, whose movement and speech have been slowed by Parkinson's disease, will attend the formal award ceremony here in September. He is not physically able to deliver an acceptance speech, so his wife, Yolanda, will speak in his stead. National Constitution Center officials announced Ali's selection Thursday, saying he has been an icon of constitutional ideals while challenging and expanding the definition of "We the people.
SPORTS
November 15, 2011 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
He fought his way up from humble beginnings as the son of a sharecropper in South Carolina to achieve worldwide fame. And on Monday morning, the life of the plainspoken and reserved Joe Frazier was remembered with eloquence and passion in a two-hour ceremony at Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church in East Mount Airy. Mr. Frazier, who moved to Philadelphia as a teenager, died Nov. 7 of liver cancer. He was 67. Three-time adversary Muhammad Ali paid his respects to the former heavyweight champion, as did fellow boxers Bernard Hopkins, Larry Holmes, and Michael Spinks, among others.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
EASTON, Pa. - Before Larry Holmes was heavyweight champion of the world, when he was just turning pro, he worked for Joe Frazier as a sparring partner. At the time, Frazier was in Philadelphia, preparing for his second fight against Muhammad Ali in January 1974. "He used to call me the Rover," Holmes said of sparring sessions with Frazier. "I did not stand still. " Holmes explained his mind-set: "Scared as hell. I was afraid. Smokin' Joe - that name scared you. That left hook scared you. " Once, and only once, Holmes stood still in front of Frazier for too long.
SPORTS
November 8, 2011 | By Bill Lyon, For The Inquirer
You could hear him coming, snorting and grunting and puffing, like a steam engine climbing a steep grade. He was swarming and unrelenting, and he prided himself that he never took a backward step, and he reduced the Sweet Science to this brutal bit of elemental math: "I'll let you hit me five times if you'll let me hit you just once. " That once was usually a left hook, a wrecking ball that could bring down buildings. Delivered to the body, it could make a man pass blood for a month.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Mike Jensen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
EASTON - Before Larry Holmes was heavyweight champion of the world, when he was just turning pro, he worked for Joe Frazier as a sparring partner. At the time, Frazier, then world champion, was in Philadelphia, preparing for his second title fight against Muhammad Ali in January of 1974. "He used to call me the Rover," Holmes said of sparring sessions with Frazier. "I did not stand still. " Holmes explained his mind-set: "Scared as hell. I was afraid. Smokin' Joe - that name scared you. That left hook scared you. " Once, and only once, Holmes stood still in front of Frazier for too long.
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