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Throat Cancer

NEWS
January 2, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rose Amanto Bowie, 82, of Warminster, the matriarch of a family of Philadelphia police officers who overcame the loss of her voice and taught others to do the same, died Tuesday of a stroke at Abington Memorial Hospital. In 1968, Mrs. Bowie was diagnosed with throat cancer and had surgery to remove her larynx. Her son, John Jr., said that his mother wanted to be able to talk to her grandchildren, so she made an effort to learn esophageal speech. She then taught the technique to others as a volunteer for 20 years at Magee Rehabilitation Hospital.
NEWS
November 12, 2003 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 600 people jammed the West Chester United Methodist Church yesterday for a solemn ceremony to bid farewell to one of Chester County's most influential native sons. Charles Evans Swope was laid to rest in Oaklands Cemetery in West Goshen. Mr. Swope, 73, died Saturday, succumbing to throat cancer after fighting the disease for more than two years. He was buried in his glasses and Marine dress uniform. His coffin had the Marine Corps seal on the inside. His dress cap was placed on his chest; also in the coffin was a photo of Mr. Swope, his son, Charles Jr., and two friends, taken at a Poconos ski resort.
NEWS
November 10, 2003 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles E. Swope, the banker and philanthropist whose hand guided society and Republican politics in West Chester and Chester County for decades, will be buried here tomorrow. He died of throat cancer at his home here Saturday night at age 73. The son of a West Chester University president, Charles Evans Swope was born on June 16, 1930, to Charles S. and Edna Swope. In addition to presiding over First Chester County Corp., which owns First National Bank of Chester County, he led a multitude of local civic associations.
NEWS
May 10, 2003 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bouquet of dry cleaning wafts up around Clarence Booker as he spreads a wool blouse on his press, lowers the machine's lid, and floors a foot-pedal to release a plume of steam through the fabric. Booker isn't as quick as he was when he started this job 21 years ago, when he was in his 80s. His hand shakes as he raises an arm. But then he somehow threads two little safety pins through the garment and a paper-covered hanger, summoning the manual dexterity of a Las Vegas card dealer.
SPORTS
November 7, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
The probe into a suspicious Breeders' Cup bet worth $3 million includes a third former Drexel student, racing industry officials said. The latest person under investigation by the New York State Racing and Wagering Board is Glen DaSilva, of New York, several racing industry officials confirmed yesterday. Two others under investigation already have been identified - Derrick Davis, of Baltimore, the man who made the winning Pick Six bets, and Chris Harn, an employee of Autotote, a company involved in the wagers under suspicion.
NEWS
May 19, 2002
Use moments as they arise My 47-year-old husband has throat cancer. We have three teenage children. From the start, 21 months ago, we have been honest with one another and our children about the seriousness of Tom's illness. My husband and I have found that we have our most productive conversations while on walks in the woods, sitting by the river, or sitting in a gazebo in a park near us. These are places that remind us of our happiest times together, so we feel happy. The discussions have never been planned.
NEWS
August 6, 2001 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Always fancying himself an entertainer rather than an artiste, Rod Stewart has never taken himself too seriously - his career, to paraphrase one of his best lyrics, is one part rhapsody, one part comedy. Saturday night at the Tweeter Center, Stewart's concert started with a humorous, day-in-the-life video segment projected on the big screens on either side of the stage: See Rod kick soccer balls! See Rod blow-dry his hair! See Rod drink beer! Fun is Stewart's business, and at the two-thirds-full Tweeter Center, business was good.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2001 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
EX-BEATLE George Harrison has admitted that he expects to die soon from cancer, the group's former producer said yesterday. The 58-year-old musician was recently treated for a brain tumour at a clinic in Switzerland, having already undergone an operation for lung cancer at the Mayo Clinic in May. The Mail said yesterday that Harrison had told friend and former producer George Martin, that he does not have long to live. Harrison and Martin could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
June 8, 2001 | By Herb Drill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Thomas J. Durkin Jr., 49, of Fort Washington, known as a caring physician and instructor in pediatrics, died Sunday of throat cancer at his home. "He was a very caring and loving pediatrician who enjoyed his patients," said his wife of 24 years, Regina Torsney-Durkin, who is also a doctor. "He was an excellent teacher for medical students," who frequently observed him in his practice. Dr. Durkin was affiliated with ABC-Family Pediatricians, which maintains three offices in the Allentown area.
LIVING
September 24, 1998 | By W. Speers This story contains material from the Associated Press, Reuters, New York Daily News, New York Post, Playbill and Daily Mirror
Imprisoned New York mob boss John Gotti has throat cancer and will undergo surgery soon, his lawyer Bruce Cutler said yesterday. He called the condition "serious, it's life-threatening," but added: "Everyone feels he's going to lick this. " Cutler noted that docs "feel it's treatable, and they're optimistic. " They found a tumor at the back of his throat near his tonsils and lymph nodes. "As I understand it, it was cancer of the tonsils and then metastasized," Cutler said. "It's been difficult to get precise information from prison authorities.
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