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Thunderstorms

NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Laurie Hollman and Idris M. Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writers Daniel LeDuc and Robert Fowler contributed to this article
Philadelphians can expect a break from the heat today with slightly lower temperatures and, most important, lower humidity, according to Accu-Weather. But make no mistake about it, it's still going to be hot. Accu-Weather meteorologist Kevin DeGroodt said today's temperature should peak at 90 degrees, down from 99 degrees yesterday. By tomorrow, the temperature should be down to 86 degrees, about normal for this time of year, he said. The real break, however, is in the humidity.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
When the great elm beside Richard McNeil's farmhouse split apart during a windy thunderstorm Aug. 24, more than a tree was lost, the Warminster resident says. "It is something that was ours from the past," McNeil said of the 350- year-old tree whose girth spanned more than 20 feet. "I don't know any other community that has a tree of that size locally. " The elm, whose splintered remains littered McNeil's front lawn Tuesday, is listed in the Bucks County Conservancy's Registry of Historic Trees, he said.
NEWS
July 21, 2010 | Inquirer Staff Report
The National Weather Service has issued a severe thunderstorm watch as the Philadelphia area began what could be the sixth heat wave of the season. The watch is in effect until 9 p.m. in all of Southeastern Pennsylvania and Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties in South Jersey. The NWS says the storms could generate damaging gusts, hail and heavy downpours. The watch was issued as the temperature at the Philadelphia International Airport hit 91 degrees before 2 p.m. Believe it or not, the fifth heat wave to bake the Philadelphia area this summer officially ended Tuesday after a five-day run when the high at the airport was 86 degrees.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A series of powerful thunderstorms swept across Pennsylvania and New Jersey before nightfall Thursday, knocking out electricity for tens of thousands of homes and killing a woman in northwestern Pennsylvania. Linda Button, 66, died when a falling tree crushed her car in Genesee Township, Potter County, as she sought refuge at a campsite. In the Philadelphia region, gusts exceeded 60 m.p.h. as thunderstorms produced scattered downpours, thousands of lightning strikes, and three-quarter-inch hail near Nazareth, Pa., according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delivery of mail funneled through the Southeastern Processing and Distribution Center in Devon was delayed yesterday after a violent early morning thunderstorm knocked out power in the area, forcing workers to sort thousands of pieces by hand. Under emergency lighting, with thunder pounding in the background, workers went through the laborious manual sorting process, working overtime into the morning. The center dispatches mail for areas in Bucks, Montgomery and Chester Counties and handles from 3.5 million to 4 million pieces a day, according to Min Kwan, manager of plant support at the center.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | By Terri Akman
I've always loved thunderstorms. I've frequently gathered my children in a huddle, perched safely on the steps of our garage, to watch Mother Nature's free light show. We'd view the awesome display and enjoy the cool breeze that often accompanies sudden storms. That cozy feeling, however, disappeared with a personal taste of Mother Nature's wrath. In an angry storm, lightning bolts crackled and thunder boomed at a frenzied pace. My house rocked from a bolt that danced just a little too close.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | By Robin Clark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They waited for hours to say goodbye: the now-elderly members of the Silent Majority in veterans' caps and white shoes; middle-aged men and women who 25 years ago filled the streets in rage over Vietnam; young people who had never known firsthand the anguish of Watergate. To some, Richard Milhous Nixon will always be the great statesman whose name was stained by a single mistake. To others, even in death, he was still "Tricky Dick," the political personification of evil. Yesterday, the debate over Nixon's place in history continued as thousands of people, both friends and foes, lined up beneath stormy skies to pay their respects as Nixon's body was returned to lie in state near the small clapboard house where he was born 81 years ago. "He was a great man. Maybe he had his faults, but he was the country's greatest leader," said Robert Caton, a retired accountant who drove from nearby Whittier with his wife, Mary, to pay their respects.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The ducklings could not have known the kind of day the Hurffville Company firefighters were having Sunday. A one-hour thunderstorm struck the southeast section of the township about 4:45 p.m., leveling a driving-range building and knocking trees into seven houses. Lightning struck a barn on Egg Harbor Road, causing a fire that was contained in a few hours. Hurffville Company firefighters had handled 18 calls related to the storm when they got the call from the Cardinal Retirement Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer
LET'S FACE it, the reason the Daily News is profiling NBC10 meteorologist Sheena Parveen is not because she is more accurate in her forecasts than any other member of the small army of weather people who take up increasing amounts of screen time on local TV news programs these days. The reason is that, thanks to her stunning visage and engaging presence, the 26-year-old weather reporter for the station's 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekday newscasts has become the market's newest "It Girl.
NEWS
September 8, 1998 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Joseph A. Slobodzian, and correspondents Angela Galloway, Adrienne Lu, Lisa Shafer, Lilian Micko and Matt Stearns, contributed to this article
Fast-moving thunderstorms knocked out power to nearly 50,000 Peco Energy customers yesterday afternoon, downing power lines and snapping trees. The solid line of thunderstorms cut from Harrisburg to Lancaster to Allentown to New Jersey. Hardest hit was northern Chester County, where 19,000 customers lost power, said Peco spokesman David Hackney. Outages affected 17,500 customers in Montgomery County and 12,000 in Bucks. Power outages in Philadelphia and Delaware County were negligible.
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