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Thyroid

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NEWS
January 10, 1990 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
A relatively rare disease of the thyroid gland and the eye muscles, first identified more than 150 years ago, has received an uncommon amount of attention in the last year since first lady Barbara Bush developed it. Her latest treatment for Graves' disease involves a 10-day course of radiation therapy beamed at the swollen muscles attached to her eyes. This treatment, which began last week, is designed to reduce the swelling that has caused Bush to suffer from double vision. The first signs of Graves' disease appeared last spring when Bush was treated - apparently successfully - for thyroid malfunction.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I have blepharitis of the eyes, which is very uncomfortable. Is there anything I can do to control the blinking? I also wanted to know if this condition is hereditary, and what factors cause it. A: Blepharitis is a non-hereditary inflammation of the oil glands of the eyelids. There are two forms. Ulcerative blepharitis results from a highly contagious bacterial infection, usually staph, that causes swelling, redness and discomfort, as well as crusting. It is treated with antibiotic eye solutions.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | By Marc Shogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
JUST ANOTHER PRETTY FACE Men, if you've got a large chin, prominent cheekbones, big eyes and a small nose, you'll be very successful at attracting women. So say University of Louisville researchers, who asked 250 women undergraduates to rate photos of college men. The large chin and prominent cheekbones suggest sexual maturity, while the big eyes and small nose suggest childlike qualities - both highly prized by the women. Coats and ties and nice smiles also appealed to the women surveyed, but beards and mustaches and stubble didn't.
NEWS
October 26, 2008 | By Megan DeMarco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It would have taken more than a light drizzle to keep family, friends and colleagues of Gail Zane away from Cooper River Park yesterday morning for a walk in her honor. Zane, who would have turned 62 next Friday, died in November after a nine-year battle with thyroid and bone cancer. Organizers hope to make the "Walk for Hope" an annual event. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society for thyroid and bone cancer research. Zane taught first grade at William Tatem School in Collingswood for almost 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I was reading a story in the newspaper that the British Medical Journal has accused Roche Pharmaceuticals of failing to provide full access to the research data on Tamiflu. The article said there's really no evidence that Tamiflu can actually stop the flu. Do you agree? Do you recommend that people still take it if they have the flu? Answer: Even if the antiviral treatment for flu works as stated, it only reduces the duration of symptoms in adults (18 to 65) by an average of 1.3 days; by just one day in folks over 65; and by roughly 36 hours in children.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Barbara Bush said yesterday she believes the President's recent illness was triggered by the stress of the Persian Gulf war and his difficult decision to send young men and women to die in battle. "The fact that you send other people's children to war . . . don't let anyone ever underestimate that," Bush said in concluding that this was the likely cause of her husband's thyroid ailment and heart scare last month. Many, but certainly not all, thyroid experts believe that Graves' disease, the overactive-thyroid ailment that afflicted President and Barbara Bush, can be triggered by stress.
NEWS
February 15, 1995 | By Art Caplan
When Americans go to the polls to vote for their president, they have a right to know the candidates' health. Dan Quayle is a case in point. Before he decided to withdraw from the 1996 presidential fray, there were some concerns about his health. But Quayle said he would release his medical records to the public only if the other candidates did the same. His doctors were mum, and rightly so. In order to ensure honesty on the part of their patients, doctors need to be zealous about patients' privacy.
SPORTS
July 2, 1992 | By Jere Longman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her feet swelled to fit a man's size 11 shoe, and they cracked and bled until walking became difficult, impossible for Gail Devers. She tried hopping on one foot then the other, but the pain grew unbearable, and she was left with no way to get around except to crawl. What a doctor had diagnosed as athlete's feet was obviously something far more threatening. In March of 1991, Devers was carried into a hospital in Palmdale, Calif. Just in time, the attending physician said. "If I had waited two more days, they would have had to amputate my feet," Devers said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: I was reading a story in the newspaper that the British Medical Journal has accused Roche Pharmaceuticals of failing to provide full access to the research data on Tamiflu. The article said there's really no evidence that Tamiflu can actually stop the flu. Do you agree? Do you recommend that people still take it if they have the flu? Answer: Even if the antiviral treatment for flu works as stated, it only reduces the duration of symptoms in adults (18 to 65) by an average of 1.3 days; by just one day in folks over 65; and by roughly 36 hours in children.
SPORTS
July 30, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
LONDON - Matt Emmons is back in the Olympics in spite of a few serious obstacles. Let's see. There was the shooting range in Minnesota that closed down. There was the difficulty with clothing that didn't pull or bunch up and interfere with his concentration. There was the quest to find a gun he really liked. There was the cancer. "I had a hell of a time finding a jacket that fit right," Emmons said. Wait a minute. Rewind a bit. What was that about cancer? Emmons, 31, a South Jersey native with a singular Olympic career marked by triumph as well as trip-ups, really did sound more concerned about the impact of his gun and clothing problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2012 | Marie McCullough
Medical technology is increasingly good at detecting abnormalities, but not so good at telling whether they are harmless. Afirma, a new gene expression test that University of Pennsylvania specialists helped to validate, promises to relieve this quandary for people with lumps on their thyroid gland. Thyroid "nodules" typically were detected only after they grew big enough to be felt in the neck, or interfered with the function of the thyroid, which makes hormones vital to metabolism.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Government officials have now confirmed what they strongly suspected a year ago: The radioactive iodine-131 in some of the region's waterways, also found in minute amounts in Philadelphia's drinking water, is coming from thyroid patients. After patients swallow the chemical in capsule or liquid form, some of it passes into their urine, which then enters the wastewater-treatment system and winds up in rivers that provide drinking water, the officials said. Philadelphia's water is safe, according to officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the state Department of Environmental Protection, the Philadelphia Water Department, and the city Department of Health.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: According to the patient information I received from Medco for those taking levothyroxine, they advise taking the thyroid tablet with a full glass of water because it can dissolve very quickly, swell in the throat, and cause choking. Given the small size of the tablet, I'm hard pressed to believe there is any real danger of swelling to any appreciable size to cause choking. Is there a real risk of choking? Answer: I've been a physician for more than 21 years and have never heard about a person choking directly as a result of a thyroid tablet rapidly dissolving and swelling in the throat.
SPORTS
March 12, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
All-Star shortstop Jose Reyes has been told to rest and refrain from athletic activity for 2 to 8 weeks until his thyroid levels normalize, another blow to the New York Mets before Opening Day. Centerfielder Carlos Beltran already is expected to miss the first month of the season following right knee surgery Jan. 13. Reyes appears likely to also start the season on the disabled list. "It doesn't look good right now. " Mets general manager Omar Minaya said yesterday. "We will have to prepare for that.
SPORTS
March 6, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
Mets shortstop Jose Reyes plans to have tests in New York after doctors in Florida discovered a thyroid imbalance, the team said yesterday. Reyes will have tests on Monday and it could take up to 48 after for doctors to receive the results. Reyes is not expected to take part in any physical activity while he is gone. "We're going to be conservative," said Mets general manager Omar Minaya. The thyroid is a gland in the neck that produces hormones that help control metabolism.
NEWS
January 22, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rates of thyroid cancer are well above the national average throughout the Philadelphia region. But why? They may be related to broader statistics that show high rates of many types of cancer in the Mid-Atlantic states, for reasons that scientists do not understand. Or, some experts suggest, they may be the result of all the medicine practiced locally - more tests lead to more diagnoses. Thyroid cancer also is found more often in older people, and more of them live here than in many other areas.
NEWS
October 26, 2008 | By Megan DeMarco INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It would have taken more than a light drizzle to keep family, friends and colleagues of Gail Zane away from Cooper River Park yesterday morning for a walk in her honor. Zane, who would have turned 62 next Friday, died in November after a nine-year battle with thyroid and bone cancer. Organizers hope to make the "Walk for Hope" an annual event. All proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society for thyroid and bone cancer research. Zane taught first grade at William Tatem School in Collingswood for almost 30 years.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Stephen Henderson and Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who remains hospitalized after surgery related to thyroid cancer over the weekend, may be sicker than Supreme Court officials are willing to admit, several medical experts told the Inquirer Washington Bureau yesterday. His illness, announced just a week before the presidential elections, immediately renewed talk of how the makeup of the court is bound to change over the next few years. Three justices - including Rehnquist - are the constant subjects of retirement predictions and rumors, but none of them, before now, have had the imminent potential for a looming medical issue that could force them from their lifetime appointments.
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