CollectionsThyroid Cancer
IN THE NEWS

Thyroid Cancer

NEWS
June 20, 2002 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey health officials will begin giving residents and workers within a 10-mile radius of nuclear plants potassium iodide tablets - small, white pills that help protect against thyroid cancer in the event of a nuclear accident or attack. Starting next month, the pills will be available at soon-to-be-designated centers in Salem and Ocean Counties, where the state's four nuclear reactors are located. Residents within that 10-mile radius, as well as people working, visiting or vacationing there, will be given a one-day supply of potassium iodide.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Elkman Schwartz, 66, of West Mount Airy, owner of the Carol Schwartz Gallery in Chestnut Hill, died of thyroid cancer Monday, Oct. 1, at home. In 1990, Mrs. Schwartz opened the business in Chestnut Hill featuring fine art, vintage posters, Judaica, jewelry, and crafts. Her husband, Elliot, had operated the gallery with her since 1995, when he retired as a dress manufacturer. The store, which also offers custom framing, corporate and residential art consultations, and collaborations with interior designers, began in 1979 in the couple's former home in Flourtown.
SPORTS
June 22, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Houston Astros acquired outfielder Derrick May from the Milwaukee Brewers yesterday in exchange for a minor-league player to be named. May, a native of Newark, Del., hit .248 with one home run and nine RBIs in 32 games with the Brewers this season. May, son of former major-leaguer Dave May, played 100 games for the Cubs last season and hit .284 with 51 RBIs. The Astros made room on the roster by sending pitcher Doug Brocail to triple-A Tucson. Designated hitter Chili Davis, the leading hitter for the AL West- leading California Angels, was placed on the disabled list with a strained left hamstring.
NEWS
April 10, 2002
New Jersey said yes. Delaware said yes. But still no word from Pennsylvania on whether it will accept the federal government's offer of free pills that could help protect citizens against some health problems that could result from a nuclear power plant accident or attack. The pills - potassium iodide - prevent the thyroid cancer that can result when someone inhales invisible amounts of radioactive iodine released accidentally by a power plant. Potassium iodide isn't a magic potion that can protect you from all consequences of spewing radiation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1998 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Music director Wolfgang Sawallisch has canceled two weeks of concerts with the Philadelphia Orchestra this month to be with his wife, who has been under treatment in Munich for thyroid cancer. Mechthild Sawallisch was admitted to a hospital in August for treatment, missing her husband's 75th birthday celebration at their home in Grassau. Sawallisch told the orchestra he wanted to be at home with her during her recuperation. In his place, Zdenek Macal, music director of the New Jersey Symphony, will conduct concerts Oct. 8-10 in the Academy of Music and Oct. 12 in the New Jersey Performing Arts Center in Newark.
NEWS
August 6, 2002 | By Amy Worden and Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
State officials outlined yesterday how they will distribute free potassium iodide pills to one million people who live or work near nuclear power plants to protect them from thyroid cancer in the event that radiation is released. Beginning Aug. 15, about 964,000 residents and workers within 10 miles of the nuclear plants - the Limerick plant in Montgomery County and four other plants in the state - will be able to pick up the free tablets for six days at several locations, said state Health Secretary Robert Zimmerman.
NEWS
January 21, 2005 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
He walked with a cane and spoke in a weaker and raspier voice than normal, but Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist nonetheless looked vigorous yesterday as he administered the oath of office to President Bush. While some television observers noted how weak and frail the chief justice appeared, in truth the 80-year-old did not look much different than usual - and seemed healthier than many had speculated. Battling an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, the chief justice has been absent from the bench since late October, fueling speculation that he might retire soon and give Bush his first occasion to fill a Supreme Court seat.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mario L. Incollingo Jr., 72, of Warrington, a former bank executive in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, died of thyroid cancer Saturday, July 9, at his home. His son, Mario L. III, said that in 1965 Mr. Incollingo founded Marconi Financial Corp. and Marconi Consumer Discount Co. in Glenside. At Glenside Savings & Loan, he became executive vice president in 1971, and was president and director from the 1970s into the early 1980s. His son said that Mr. Incollingo "engineered the 1985 merger of Glenside Savings & Loan with Pennsylvania Savings Bank, where he became executive vice president.
NEWS
August 6, 2002 | By Amy Worden and Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
State officials outlined yesterday how they will distribute free potassium iodide pills to one million people who live or work near nuclear power plants to protect them from thyroid cancer in the event that radiation is released. Beginning Aug. 15, about 964,000 residents and workers within 10 miles of the nuclear plants - the Limerick plant in Montgomery County and four other plants in the state - will be able to pick up the free tablets for six days at several locations, said state Health Secretary Robert Zimmerman.
NEWS
July 14, 2002 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Worrying about nuclear disaster seemed an unlikely thing to be doing on a sunny summer afternoon in this sleepy farm town. But Joanne Gross, her husband and granddaughter in tow, said she wasn't taking any chances. "We're at war," Gross said grimly, scooping up three tiny, silver-wrapped pills that officials hope will keep her family safer in the event of a nuclear accident or attack. "We have to do everything we can to be safe. " This weekend, New Jersey began the first of six sessions aimed at preparing residents for the worst.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|