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Thyroid Cancer

ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2011 | By Patricia Montemurri, Detroit Free Press
DETROIT - Anna Fionda, a hairstylist who occupied the first chair at Edwin Paul Salon in Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich., for 27 years, drove herself to the hospital emergency room on Valentine's Day 2010. She was queasy, dehydrated, and feverish. The next thing she remembers is waking up in a hospital bed on March 13. She had developed a bacterial infection, which led to septic shock, and her body had shunted blood away from her appendages to save her vital organs and brain. Her limbs were black up to her elbows and knees.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2010 | By Dan Gross
GOOD NEWS for DJ Too Tuff , of the legendary Philly hip-hop act Tuff Crew . He's off probation. Too Tuff, born Joseph Hicks , was released from jail earlier this year - he was sentenced on an assault charge stemming from a fight at Silk City (5th & Spring Garden) while on parole for weed possession. Now that he's free to travel, Too Tuff can join fellow original Tuff Crew members LA Kidd , Ice Dog and Tone Love for a European tour in March, when the group will play Paris, Denmark, Wales, London and Amsterdam, performing some of their hits and new material.
NEWS
September 2, 2010
Dorothy Sucher, 77, whose $5-a-week reporting for a small-town newspaper 45 years ago led to a U.S. Supreme Court decision that bolstered freedom of the press, died Aug. 22 at her home in Silver Spring, Md. The cause was thyroid cancer, her husband, Joseph, said. She was reporting for the nonprofit Greenbelt News Review in Greenbelt, Md., in 1965 when she covered City Council meetings where residents railed against a real estate developer's position. Charles Bresler refused to sell the city a tract for a school unless it agreed to zoning variances on two of his other properties.
NEWS
January 22, 2010 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rates of thyroid cancer are well above the national average throughout the Philadelphia region. But why? They may be related to broader statistics that show high rates of many types of cancer in the Mid-Atlantic states, for reasons that scientists do not understand. Or, some experts suggest, they may be the result of all the medicine practiced locally - more tests lead to more diagnoses. Thyroid cancer also is found more often in older people, and more of them live here than in many other areas.
SPORTS
July 19, 2008 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Laura Ladden believes that she has found the correct balance among motherhood, her job as a schoolteacher, and tournament competition, and that's bad news for the best players in the Women's Golf Association of Philadelphia. Ladden, 32, proved her dominance again this week, finishing up her run yesterday with a 12-and-10 victory over Alison Shoemaker at Rolling Green Golf and Country Club to win the Glenna Collett Vare Cup for the seventh time. Ladden, of Penn Oaks, was steady if not spectacular during the scheduled 36-hole match.
NEWS
September 4, 2005 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
William Hubbs Rehnquist, the 16th chief justice of the United States and leader of sweeping efforts to curb federal power and expand state authority, died last night, ending a nearly yearlong fight with thyroid cancer. Court officials said Justice Rehnquist, who was 80, died at his home in Arlington, Va., surrounded by his three adult children. His death ends one of the 20th century's most distinguished Supreme Court careers - one that lasted 33 years - and is likely to touch off a heavily financed and bitterly partisan battle over his replacement.
NEWS
November 2, 2004 | By Stephen Henderson INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist did not return to the Supreme Court yesterday. He acknowledged undergoing radiation and chemotherapy for the thyroid cancer he disclosed last week. The news - released the day before a presidential election that could decide who picks Rehnquist's successor - fueled speculation among doctors and court-watchers that the chief justice was quite ill and might be nearing a point where he could not continue in his position. "I'd say that for an 80-year-old man undergoing radiation and chemotherapy, maintaining a full schedule as chief justice is, at the very least, dubious," said Nicholas Sarlis, associate professor of medicine at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and a former top thyroid-cancer researcher at the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
October 26, 2004 | By Stephen Henderson and Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist, who remains hospitalized after surgery related to thyroid cancer over the weekend, may be sicker than Supreme Court officials are willing to admit, several medical experts told the Inquirer Washington Bureau yesterday. His illness, announced just a week before the presidential elections, immediately renewed talk of how the makeup of the court is bound to change over the next few years. Three justices - including Rehnquist - are the constant subjects of retirement predictions and rumors, but none of them, before now, have had the imminent potential for a looming medical issue that could force them from their lifetime appointments.
NEWS
June 25, 2002 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jessie Gemerek refuses to accept limitations - even when they are life-threatening. That's one reason the recent graduate of Gloucester Catholic High School became one of the best softball players in South Jersey. She was an Inquirer first-team all-South Jersey selection as an outfielder this spring, and helped lead Gloucester Catholic to the South Jersey Parochial B title last year. What she has done off the field has been much more difficult and impressive. After experiencing flulike symptoms for much of her sophomore year, Gemerek discovered why she hadn't been feeling well.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
On Dec. 20, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission made states an offer that really is too good to refuse. The NRC invited states with nuclear power plants within their borders or nearby to apply for free supplies of potassium iodide, the anti-radiation drug that prevents thyroid cancer in adults and children exposed to radiation. In doing so, the NRC was encouraging states to stockpile the drug - the same simple stuff used in smaller amounts to iodize table salt - so that it would be readily available to residents living within 10 miles of nuclear plants.
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