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Tianjin

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NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
TIANJIN, China - This port city of 13 million on the coast of northern China could really give an American mayor a serious case of investment envy. For Mayor Nutter, that moment may have started from the moment he boarded a bullet-train in Beijing's Jetson-style rail station for the 33-minute, 69-mile journey to Tianjin. Or maybe it was when his police escort here took him past some of the factories for 185 of the world's Fortune 500 companies, including GlaxoSmithKline. Or when he viewed a model of a master plan for an economic development zone rising from salt flats and equal in size to Center City and South Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The Pennsylvania Ballet is making its maiden voyage abroad in a big way. On Thursday morning, artistic director Christopher d'Amboise, six dancers and a support staff of two gathered in front of the ballet's headquarters on South Broad Street and piled into an airport van taking them to the first leg of a 20-hour journey. Destination: China. The dancers are representing Philadelphia in the Tianjin Sister Cities Arts Festival, which runs from tomorrow to Oct. 3. The first American city to establish a sister-city relationship with China, Philadelphia embarked on a cultural, economic and educational exchange program with Tianjin in 1980.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
TIANJIN, China - This port city of 13 million on the coast of northern China could really give an American mayor a serious case of investment envy. For Mayor Nutter, that feeling may have started the moment he boarded a bullet train in Beijing's Jetsons -style rail station for the 69-mile, 33-minute journey to Tianjin. Or maybe it was when his police escort here took him past some of the factories of 185 of the world's Fortune 500 companies, including GlaxoSmithKline. Or when he viewed a model of a master plan for an economic development zone rising from salt flats and equal in size to Center City and South Philadelphia combined.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
TIANJIN, China - Three years ago, Gary Biehn, a partner with White & Williams in Philadelphia, wanted to expand his law firm's reach to this port city in northern China, an economic powerhouse that gets special attention from the country's central planners. The firm already had a business tie to a law firm in Shanghai and saw benefits to connecting with Chinese lawyers here. Biehn reached out to the International Visitors Council of Philadelphia, and a string of calls and connections that played out over the last year culminated in a business agreement signed here Monday under the eye of Mayor Nutter and his Tianjin counterpart, Huang Xingguo.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
BEIJING - For a trip that started with an unplanned encounter with a man dressed as Santa Claus doing a Rocky run up the Great Wall, it was only fitting that Mayor Nutter should wrap up his five days here with a photo-op next to Big Bird in a schoolyard. The mayor's trip had many surreal moments, but there was serious business as well. Nutter was invited to China as a speaker for a conference hosted by former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, whose think tank in Chicago is tackling the critical issue of making China's megacities more livable and sustainable.
NEWS
September 9, 1992 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
The Pennsylvania Ballet is sending a corps of six dancers to an international arts festival in China this month - the first time the ballet has danced abroad in its 28-year history. The three performances are part of the Tianjin International Sister Cities Arts Festival, ballet officials said they would announce today at City Hall. The ballet will be representing Philadelphia, which is a sister city to Tianjin. The festival runs from Sept. 28 to Oct. 3. The dancers will perform three times, in excerpts from works by George Balanchine and Pennsylvania Ballet's artistic director, Christopher d'Amboise.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bryn Mawr College student who was ordered out of China last week said yesterday that she was questioned by Chinese government security officers for more than six hours and was forced to give a "confession" about her participation in pro-democracy demonstrations. Helen Qubain, 20, an exchange student at Nankai University in Tianjin, an industrial port about 75 miles from Beijing, was given five days to leave China after she was interrogated June 25 by Chinese authorities in the Tianjin office of the Public Security Bureau.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | By Andy Wallace and Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writers
Hwa Walkenstein, 68, who worked for years to forge bonds of friendship and trade between the United States and China and was a catalyst in making Philadelphia and Tianjin sister cities, died July 21 in Pennsylvania Hospital. Because Mrs. Walkenstein was stricken with cancer, her hospital room became the setting for her daughter's wedding just two days before she died. The wedding, between Noi Walkenstein and Lane Sandler, had been planned for Aug. 11, but her daughter - a physician who treats cancer patients - moved up the date when she saw Mrs. Walkenstein's condition deteriorating.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship. TIANJIN, China - "Wasn't that a mud field last year?" It was an idle observation made as the Philadelphia Orchestra's buses cruised along the scenic route to the Tianjin Performing Arts Center for a Wednesday evening concert, passing meticulously landscaped parks filled with beds of plump crimson tulips.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
BEIJING - For a trip that started with an unplanned encounter with a man dressed as Santa Claus doing a Rocky run up the Great Wall, it was only fitting that Mayor Nutter should wrap up his five days here with a photo-op next to Big Bird in a schoolyard. The mayor's trip had many surreal moments, but there was serious business as well. Nutter was invited to China as a speaker for a conference hosted by former U.S. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, whose think tank in Chicago is tackling the critical issue of making China's megacities more livable and sustainable.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
TIANJIN, China - Three years ago, Gary Biehn, a partner with White & Williams in Philadelphia, wanted to expand his law firm's reach to this port city in northern China, an economic powerhouse that gets special attention from the country's central planners. The firm already had a business tie to a law firm in Shanghai and saw benefits to connecting with Chinese lawyers here. Biehn reached out to the International Visitors Council of Philadelphia, and a string of calls and connections that played out over the last year culminated in a business agreement signed here Monday under the eye of Mayor Nutter and his Tianjin counterpart, Huang Xingguo.
NEWS
December 4, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
TIANJIN, China - This port city of 13 million on the coast of northern China could really give an American mayor a serious case of investment envy. For Mayor Nutter, that feeling may have started the moment he boarded a bullet train in Beijing's Jetsons -style rail station for the 69-mile, 33-minute journey to Tianjin. Or maybe it was when his police escort here took him past some of the factories of 185 of the world's Fortune 500 companies, including GlaxoSmithKline. Or when he viewed a model of a master plan for an economic development zone rising from salt flats and equal in size to Center City and South Philadelphia combined.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
TIANJIN, China - This port city of 13 million on the coast of northern China could really give an American mayor a serious case of investment envy. For Mayor Nutter, that moment may have started from the moment he boarded a bullet-train in Beijing's Jetson-style rail station for the 33-minute, 69-mile journey to Tianjin. Or maybe it was when his police escort here took him past some of the factories for 185 of the world's Fortune 500 companies, including GlaxoSmithKline. Or when he viewed a model of a master plan for an economic development zone rising from salt flats and equal in size to Center City and South Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
Iraqi army delays leaving cities BAGHDAD - The Iraqi army was supposed to pull out of the nation's cities by the end of this year but is delaying the pullback over security concerns, an Iraqi military spokesman said Saturday. The delay is an acknowledgment that even after four years of declining violence, Iraq's police force is not capable of maintaining security on its own. The other worry is that violence will increase when American troops complete their own withdrawal from the country at year's end. The government's plan remains to eventually hand over security to police and pull Iraqi troops back to bases outside the cities.
SPORTS
August 8, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Stuart Holden ended the United States' scoring drought with a goal in the second half, giving the Americans a 1-0 victory over Japan in Tianjin yesterday in an Olympic opener. The Scottish-born Holden struck a loose ball at the top of the penalty area that Japanese goalkeeper Shusaku Nishikawa was able to slow but couldn't keep from trickling over the line in the 47th minute. It was a welcome change for Holden who hasn't scored for Houston in 16 Major League Soccer games this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is not your ordinary paint job - unless your ordinary paint job includes partnering with the U.S. State Department to get traditional artisans from China to Philadelphia, shopping for paint supplies at a restaurant-equipment store, and finding fresh pig blood to add to the homemade primer, which will be boiled in a giant wok. Don't ask Sherwin-Williams. Ask Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corp.'s John Chin, local architect Yao C. Huang, Nancy Gilboy from the International Visitors Council, and the five artists from Philadelphia's Chinese sister city of Tianjin.
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