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NEWS
June 9, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Everybody's griping about the high cost of summer concert tickets - in some cases reaching price parity with Broadway spectacles. But only one band's doing something about it. Pearl Jam, the grunge rock group, has gone to the antitrust division of the U.S. Justice Department, claiming it was unduly pressured to pump up its ticket prices by Ticketmaster, the national computerized ticket agency, in collusion with the North American Concert Promoters...
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
You paid $25 for a club-level ticket to the Kenny Chesney show at Lincoln Financial Field in June? Better cough up some more, says Ticketmaster, which notified online buyers that they were undercharged because of an "inadvertent error at the box office. " The price of an upper-deck club-level ticket is $99.50. Plus fees. TicketNews.com, which broke the story, says Ticketmaster is giving buyers the option of getting a refund or paying the additional $74.50 by Friday. Between 200 and 300 tickets were affected.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2006 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast Corp. today will roll out its new ticket-selling business, ComcastTIX, in Philadelphia, ousting Ticketmaster at some area facilities. The new venture gives Comcast complete control over ticket sales at its premier local venues, the Wachovia Center and the Wachovia Spectrum. New competition for Ticketmaster won't lead to lower prices for consumers. Comcast-Spectacor president Peter Luukko said ComcastTIX fees would match those of competitors - often about $13 a ticket.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Halloween business is really competitive," says Steve Kopelman , Arizona-based operator of haunted house attractions across the nation's Midwest and Southwest. Ticket sales rose and new haunted-housing developers crowded the market in the late 2000s as a rash of cut-'em-up Hollywood movies encouraged the fans of extra-bloody scenes. Retailers fed the market by pumping up Halloween promotions to bridge sales between back-to-school and Christmas. But the shock-seeking population is limited, and seasonal.
NEWS
July 1, 1994 | By Paul Arnold, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Members of Pearl Jam, one of the nation's best-selling bands, took on Ticketmaster, the nation's best-selling ticket distributor, during a colorful congressional hearing yesterday. And if tickets had been sold to the hearing, they would have been the hottest in town. A gaggle of young people with bead necklaces, T-shirts and ripped jeans crowded the hallways of the Rayburn House Office Building for a glimpse of the two "grunge band" members who are fighting the service charges attached to some concert tickets.
NEWS
October 1, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The music-business version of David and Goliath, as seen by the Colorado jam band known as the String Cheese Incident: Music-loving ski bums graduate from playing for lift tickets to back-to-back sellouts of Radio City Music Hall through hard work and good vibes. The group encourages taping at its shows and lets employees bring their dogs to the office. It forms a discount ticket agency and travel service for fans. Then, suddenly, the world's ticket giant gets all lactose-intolerant and threatens to unplug the party.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2003 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ticketmaster, the concert-ticketing giant accused last month of antitrust violations, has countersued the String Cheese Incident, contending that the Colorado jam band's practice of selling seats directly to fans interferes with Ticketmaster's contracts with venues. In papers filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Denver, Ticketmaster denied the band's claim that it exploited a monopoly position in the industry to keep the String Cheese Incident from offering its fans tickets with discounted surcharges.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
For the 50,000 fans gathered at Soldier Field for the final scheduled performance of Pearl Jam's troubled 1995 tour, the first glimpse of Eddie Vedder was not exactly encouraging. The tortured lead singer, whose more- alternative-than-thou stance has evoked praise and scorn equally, appeared on stage with a notebook tucked under his arm. Fans had to know they were in for some oratory Tuesday night: After all, this was the swan song of one of the most confused tours in rock history, and Vedder, ever aware of his public, knew some explanation was in order.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | BY GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
IN ITS GLORY DAYS as a burlesque house, the Trocadero Theatre in Chinatown ran ads describing performers like Shanda Lear ("lights up our stage"), Lynn Oleum ("she'll floor you"), Jerri Toll ("for men with tired blood") and Della K. Tessen ("a delicious platter"). Yesterday, the Troc, on Arch Street near 10th, a former strip joint that started as an opera house and is now a venue for grunge bands, described itself as bankrupt and specifically asked for protection from Ticketmaster. Its operators, Joon Associates Inc., and president Joanna Pang filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in federal court in Philadelphia, seeking a "breathing spell" from creditors.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 10 this morning, Eagles single-game tickets went up for grabs online and by phone through Ticketmaster. By 10:30, only isolated seats - no two together - remained for an assortment of regular season games. At that point, the only game clearly marked "sold out" by Ticketmaster was the Oct. 3 return visit of Donovan McNabb as a Washington Redskin. By 11, the team had announced online that all the tickets were gone - even if Ticketmaster was still displaying results to requests for single seats to the Atlanta and Houston games.
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NEWS
December 27, 2012
David E. Homan, 59, formerly of Newtown Square, chief operating officer of New Era Tickets, died Friday, Dec. 21, at Lankenau Hospital of complications from heart surgery. Mr. Homan, who spent more than 35 years in the sports, entertainment, and ticketing business, joined New Era in 2003. The company is a subsidiary of Comcast-Spectacor. Previously, he had been general manager of Ticketmaster in the Philadelphia region and for seven years was general manager for Ticketmaster in the New York area.
SPORTS
March 7, 2012
VILLANOVA will take part in the 2K Sports Classic in November to open its season, organizers announced. The Wildcats will host regional-round games Nov. 9 to 11 and then have a spot in the championship rounds Nov. 15 and 16 at Madison Square Garden in New York. Purdue, Alabama and Oregon State also will host regional games and advance to the Garden. In all, 12 teams will compete. The remaining eight schools will take part in subregional games at campus sites, while the four teams play in New York.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Halloween business is really competitive," says Steve Kopelman , Arizona-based operator of haunted house attractions across the nation's Midwest and Southwest. Ticket sales rose and new haunted-housing developers crowded the market in the late 2000s as a rash of cut-'em-up Hollywood movies encouraged the fans of extra-bloody scenes. Retailers fed the market by pumping up Halloween promotions to bridge sales between back-to-school and Christmas. But the shock-seeking population is limited, and seasonal.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | BY GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
IN ITS GLORY DAYS as a burlesque house, the Trocadero Theatre in Chinatown ran ads describing performers like Shanda Lear ("lights up our stage"), Lynn Oleum ("she'll floor you"), Jerri Toll ("for men with tired blood") and Della K. Tessen ("a delicious platter"). Yesterday, the Troc, on Arch Street near 10th, a former strip joint that started as an opera house and is now a venue for grunge bands, described itself as bankrupt and specifically asked for protection from Ticketmaster. Its operators, Joon Associates Inc., and president Joanna Pang filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in federal court in Philadelphia, seeking a "breathing spell" from creditors.
NEWS
August 1, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every year, when the Eagles put single-game seats on sale, fans snatch them at an even faster rate than the club signs top free agents. The madness will start at 10 a.m. Tuesday - and likely end within a handful of minutes for the most popular games. Within a half-hour, the entire regular season is usually gone. For that reason, trying for a less popular game - like Oct. 2 against the San Francisco 49ers - is more likely to succeed than greedily going for the Sept. 25 home opener against the New York Giants, the Oct. 30 matchup with the hated Dallas Cowboys (even if it is at night)
NEWS
November 30, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
You paid $25 for a club-level ticket to the Kenny Chesney show at Lincoln Financial Field in June? Better cough up some more, says Ticketmaster, which notified online buyers that they were undercharged because of an "inadvertent error at the box office. " The price of an upper-deck club-level ticket is $99.50. Plus fees. TicketNews.com, which broke the story, says Ticketmaster is giving buyers the option of getting a refund or paying the additional $74.50 by Friday. Between 200 and 300 tickets were affected.
NEWS
June 15, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 10 this morning, Eagles single-game tickets went up for grabs online and by phone through Ticketmaster. By 10:30, only isolated seats - no two together - remained for an assortment of regular season games. At that point, the only game clearly marked "sold out" by Ticketmaster was the Oct. 3 return visit of Donovan McNabb as a Washington Redskin. By 11, the team had announced online that all the tickets were gone - even if Ticketmaster was still displaying results to requests for single seats to the Atlanta and Houston games.
NEWS
March 22, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Look for a bunch of major local concerts to go on sale this week. Almost all are available through LiveNation.com, as well as either through Ticketmaster.com or ComcastTix.com. First up, at 10 this morning, were tickets for Sting , with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra , at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center on Saturday, July 10. Available through Live Nation and Ticketmaster. Tickets went on sale Saturday for Sting's July 9 concert at the Borgata in Atlantic City, through ComcastTix.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2010 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Comcast-Spectacor, an arena-management firm jointly owned by Comcast Corp. and Ed Snider, will purchase a ticketing-software business from Ticketmaster Entertainment Inc. as part of a government settlement that clears the way for the proposed merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation Inc. The government said yesterday that Ticketmaster, which sells more than 100 million tickets a year, also has to license its primary ticketing software to AEG, the...
NEWS
October 29, 2009 | By David Balto
Nine months after Ticketmaster announced its proposed merger with Live Nation, the Justice Department's antitrust investigation seems to be entering the ninth inning, and the bases are loaded. Numerous consumer groups and 50 members of Congress have written in opposition to the merger. Britain's antitrust cops have also come out against it. And it's becoming clear to the public that the merger will harm consumers and competition. The reasons for the deal are quite transparent. Ticketmaster faced its first significant competitive threat when Live Nation announced earlier this year that it was entering the primary ticketing market.
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