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Tim Burton

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NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
ANYONE CAN squeeze a tear or two out of a boy-and-his-dog story. Boy and his DEAD dog? That's a job for Tim Burton, who returns to form with "Frankenweenie," a first-rate stop-motion animated 3-D movie adapted from his 1984 short film. It's quintessential Burton - the tale of an eccentric but well-meaning misfit (think Ed Wood, Edward Scissorhands, Jack Skellington) whose outside-the-box (pine, in this case) ideas and talents are at once alarming and enchanting. The misfit here is Victor (voiced by Charlie Tahan)
NEWS
December 25, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
At the center of Tim Burton's lush new fairy tale is Edward Bloom, a Big Fish who lives so large that, to hear him tell it, where he swims the minnows are whale-sized. Edward, played in his prime by robust Ewan McGregor and on his deathbed by crusty Albert Finney, is an Alabama gallant and traveling salesman who weaves stories out of whole cloth, then embroiders them in crimson reds and canary yellows. Or so it seems to his estranged son, Will (Billy Crudup), a journalist who views the truth in black and white.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
A brooding boy with wild black hair and shears for hands - it's an image that Tim Burton has carried around in his head for years. Back when he was a brooding boy with wild black hair - a misfit Valley kid at Burbank High - Burton would sketch the character in his notebook: tall and skinny, with giant scissors at the end of each arm. Seventeen years later, Burton, 32, has finally gotten the image out of his head and onto the screen. Edward Scissorhands, a gleefully demented fairy tale, opened Friday across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2014 | Reprinted from Thursday's editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'With your big eyes and your big lies . . . ," Lana Del Rey purrs over the end titles of Tim Burton's Big Eyes . It's a sultry, albeit hardly subtle coda to a wondrously strange true story about art and heartbreak, intellectual property theft, and the subjugation of women. Specifically, the subjugation of one Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) by husband Walter Keane (Christoph Waltz), who in the 1960s claimed his wife's paintings of saucer-eyed waifs as his own. Signed simply "Keane" (often followed by a copyright symbol)
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The aliens in "Mars Attacks" have come to destroy our way of life, and they are doing us a favor. At least in the decidedly eccentric opinion of director Tim Burton - his heroes, remember, include Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood and Pee-wee Herman - whose perspective on American culture is decidedly unique. His is a disaster movie with a twist: We are the disaster. The characters in this movie represent the worst from all walks of American life. They include an image-conscious president (Jack Nicholson)
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Now, a good host introduces his guests. But in the spectral, hyperkinetic comedy Beetlejuice, director Tim Burton is not a good host, although he is incontestably an imaginative one. It's up to us to make the introductions: Topper, have you met Pee-wee's Playhouse ? Beetlejuice is a supernatural spoof set in a Connecticut country house whose L. L. Bean-clad owners die in a freak car crash but leave their genial spirits to haunt their beloved three-story. Trouble is, Adam and Barbara Maitland (Alec Baldwin and Geena Davis)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2000 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
When he was a young animator at the Disney Studio, Tim Burton toiled at his drawing board and turned out traditional images. But he also amused himself with a daydream that, once he became a high-profile filmmaker, turned into The Nightmare Before Christmas. First released to much-deserved acclaim in 1993, The Nightmare Before Christmas is back in time for Halloween. And it's a perfect film for the holiday. Burton, the man who gave us Batman, Beetlejuice and Edward Scissorhands, is incapable of a conventional idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015
THE GENTLEMEN stationed at the Disney princess tribute at the Philadelphia Flower Show were doing their best to be patient with me. Not only did I not know the names of any of the flowers ("Is that an orchid?"), I often could not decode the most basic design clues. To my shame, since I'm the movie critic, and I was dispatched to evaluate the flower show on that basis. I was stymied, for instance, by the meaning of artfully constructed bunches of red carnations, until State College florist and designer Daniel Vaughn gave me a tactful prompt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
That "Edward Scissorhands" seems deceptively like children's fantasy says a lot about the way director Tim Burton views the world. From "Pee-wee's Big Adventure" to "Beetlejuice" to "Batman," the visionary Burton has imparted a sense of childlike wonder to his movies. He has preserved that quality even as his pictures have grown progressively darker. "Edward Scissorhands" is his best movie yet, an adult fairy tale about our conflicting fascination and fear when confronted with things we do not understand.
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
TIM BURTON, Lewis Carroll, Johnny Depp, 3-D Imax - sounds like a party. A Mad Hatter's tea party, with beverages that make you small, cakes that make you big, and tasty images that will feed your head. And there is some nourishment to be had in "Alice," which at its best blends the director's sense of the macabre with Carroll's surreal whimsy. But as parties go, it's not the mindblower you probably hoped for - don't expect to wake up next to boxer Mike Tyson's pet tiger, wondering where the previous day went.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015
THE GENTLEMEN stationed at the Disney princess tribute at the Philadelphia Flower Show were doing their best to be patient with me. Not only did I not know the names of any of the flowers ("Is that an orchid?"), I often could not decode the most basic design clues. To my shame, since I'm the movie critic, and I was dispatched to evaluate the flower show on that basis. I was stymied, for instance, by the meaning of artfully constructed bunches of red carnations, until State College florist and designer Daniel Vaughn gave me a tactful prompt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2014 | Reprinted from Thursday's editions. By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'With your big eyes and your big lies . . . ," Lana Del Rey purrs over the end titles of Tim Burton's Big Eyes . It's a sultry, albeit hardly subtle coda to a wondrously strange true story about art and heartbreak, intellectual property theft, and the subjugation of women. Specifically, the subjugation of one Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) by husband Walter Keane (Christoph Waltz), who in the 1960s claimed his wife's paintings of saucer-eyed waifs as his own. Signed simply "Keane" (often followed by a copyright symbol)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Splitsville for Carter Helena Bonham Carter , 48, is back on the market. The Shakespearean marvel and her partner, fantasy auteur Tim Burton , 56, have split up after 13 years. They "separated amicably earlier this year and have continued to be friends and co-parent their children," Carter's rep tells People. The couple, who met on the set of Burton's 2001 picture Planet of the Apes , have two kids, son Billy , 11, and daughter Nell , 7.   Miley's own Kennedy Patrick Schwarzenegger 's family have met his gf, Miley Cyrus , and despite all the bad twerkadelic press around the gal, they like her!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014
YES, VIRGINIA, there is a Santa Claus. That's what the makers of "The Interview" have to be thinking, now that Sony has announced a limited theatrical release of the controversial comedy. After hackers made terror threats, Sony pulled the film. Critics including President Obama cried foul, citing First Amendment issues. Yesterday, moviegoers got word that Sony had done an about-face and had agreed to allow the movie to be shown starting on Christmas Day after all. The movie giant did not immediately say how many theaters would show the film, but it's expected that "The Interview" will open in fewer than the wide release originally planned.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
ANYONE CAN squeeze a tear or two out of a boy-and-his-dog story. Boy and his DEAD dog? That's a job for Tim Burton, who returns to form with "Frankenweenie," a first-rate stop-motion animated 3-D movie adapted from his 1984 short film. It's quintessential Burton - the tale of an eccentric but well-meaning misfit (think Ed Wood, Edward Scissorhands, Jack Skellington) whose outside-the-box (pine, in this case) ideas and talents are at once alarming and enchanting. The misfit here is Victor (voiced by Charlie Tahan)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2012 | By Nancy G. Heller, For The Inquirer
It's 60 minutes of sheer delight - jam-packed with slapstick humor, astonishing acrobatic feats, witty visual effects, romance, heartbreak, and music ranging from jazz to Tuvan throat singing. Oyster , inspired by a book of poems by filmmaker Tim Burton, is a signature work of Israel's award-winning Inbal Pinto & Avshalom Pollak Dance Company. The troupe's three-day run at the Annenberg Center, which began Thursday, marks the end of its latest U.S. tour. While each of the vignettes that make up Oyster evokes its own mood, the overall sense of eeriness and androgyny - and especially the dancers' stark white makeup, fright wigs, and outrageous costumes - are certainly Burtonesque.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's not your mother's Alice in Wonderland . Nor is Tim Burton's inspired mash-up of action fantasies your granny's magic-mushroom milkshake of Lewis Carroll's mindbender. If there were truth-in-titling, Burton's movie rightly would be called Alice in Narnia : With Stops at Disneyland, the Shire, Rohan, Naboo, and Oz . The White Rabbit is here. As are the Mad Hatter, Queen of Hearts, and Cheshire Cat. But as reimagined by Linda Woolverton, Disney's resident girl-power scribe ( Beauty and the Beast , Mulan )
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
TIM BURTON, Lewis Carroll, Johnny Depp, 3-D Imax - sounds like a party. A Mad Hatter's tea party, with beverages that make you small, cakes that make you big, and tasty images that will feed your head. And there is some nourishment to be had in "Alice," which at its best blends the director's sense of the macabre with Carroll's surreal whimsy. But as parties go, it's not the mindblower you probably hoped for - don't expect to wake up next to boxer Mike Tyson's pet tiger, wondering where the previous day went.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2010 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
With "The Complete Alice In Wonderland," Dynamite has again taken a classic book, whose characters and story are seemingly known well by the general public and provided a fresh, exciting take by going to the trouble of adapting the original work and telling the story as it was originally meant to be told and in a way only the comics medium could tell it. Through the years, various interpretations of the work have tended to focus on characters like...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I'm a bit baffled at the astonishment expressed in some quarters that Tim Burton shows a knack for the movie musical in "Sweeney Todd. " This is the same guy, after all, who made "The Nightmare Before Christmas," one of the best and most popular movie musicals of recent years - also a production whose visual style and palette is strikingly similar to "Sweeney Todd. " Burton's taste for the garish, macabre musical number (see also "The Corpse Bride") goes all the way back to the "Banana Boat" sequence in "Beetlejuice": Any guy who turns shrimp cocktail into grasping zombie fingers is, for my money, the right guy for this job. In fact, it's no surprise to learn that Burton, as a student, fell in love with the power of drama watching "Sweeney Todd" performed on the London stage; he liked it so much he went back to see it three times, eagerly absorbing every minute in each three-hour production.
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