CollectionsTime Machine
IN THE NEWS

Time Machine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Jake Blumgart
The story begins in the third-floor stairwell of the Fairfax apartment building in West Philadelphia. Chris Stevens and his friends met there to avoid disturbing his wife, a medical student who needs all the sleep she can get. The guys drank beers and brainstormed comic-book ideas. One took hold: classic fairy tales reimagined through a science-fiction lens. Once Upon a Time Machine was conceived in the summer of 2009, but it took until this autumn for the book, all 432 gorgeously rendered pages of it, to be born.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / BOB WILLIAMS
Ridley Creek State Park became a time machine this week, carrying visitors back 200 years to the colonial era. It was Colonial Festival Day on Sunday, a chance to see how residents of an 18th-century farm worked and played. Costumed participants demonstrated weaving, blacksmithing, pottery-making and tomahawk throwing. Visitors tried log-splitting or working a two-man saw, or visited a colonial kitchen. But colonial life wasn't all work - there were 18th-century dances and even a fashion show.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
There was a bully on Broad Street on Saturday, but he had nothing to do with hockey pucks. Rising 16 feet over the crowds in front of the Kimmel Center at Spruce Street, a T. rex showed his terrible teeth, roared a sort-of terrible roar, and wiggled his teeny, terrible forearms. Children thronged around him in amazement. Just across Spruce Street, crowds stared in fascination at a fenced-off gang of welders flinging sparks, shooting white-hot arcs of fire and twisting and soldering metal.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Last Supper" is a glorified "Tales From the Crypt" about five snotty grad students who decide to earn their liberal credentials by inviting conservatives over for dinner and killing them. To justify these extreme measures, the insufferably smug students pose a hypothetical question: What if a time machine put you in Austria in 1909, where you met a young art student named Adolph Hitler? At this point he has done no wrong. Still, knowing what he will eventually do, do you kill him?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Festival of the Arts — the Kimmel Center-steered citywide outpouring of performances, exhibitions, wine-tastings, lectures, and film-screenings that culminated in a massive street fair at the end of its first incarnation in April 2011 — will be back. From the end of March to the end of April 2013, PIFA, as it's known, will unspool across about 50 venues in the city, according to J. Edward Cambron, the festival's executive director. Cambron pegged the budget at about $5.5 million.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | By Pheralyn Dove, Special to The Inquirer
Bouncy and bright, animated and excited, the children at the McKinley Elementary School in Elkins Park filed into the auditorium last week to meet "Cowboy Mike" Keever. They knew he was from the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, and they were excited. Cowboy Mike, whose mission was to convey the importance of reading, used clown gags, magic tricks and slapstick to captivate the 200 youngsters in kindergarten through fourth grade. "Hi, my name is Cowboy Mike, and just like our circus, reading is three rings of fun," Keever said as he jumped from behind his "Time Machine," a huge, boxlike contraption, to greet the pupils.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
I AM A GUEST in Herb Mandel's time machine, which has landed us on 10th Street above Susquehanna Avenue in the Great Depression of the 1930s. Although Philadelphia and America were back on their heels, it was the happiest period of Herb's life, as childhood is meant to be. In the foreword to a self-published book of vignettes and watercolor sketches, the 85-year-old retired teacher and artist writes that "the reality of the Great Depression was...
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN THE COSMOS of brainy cartoon dogs, Mr. Peabody remains unsurpassed. No less a pop-culture connoisseur than Seth MacFarlane acknowledged this in "Family Guy," when Peabody-inspired Brian took a time machine back to visit Christopher Columbus. Now the time has come for the tributes and references to give way to the real thing - a 3-D animated feature "Mr. Peabody and Sherman," adapted from the beloved '60s Jay Ward animated short about a time-traveling pedagogical dog and his adopted boy Sherman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Insanity," Albert Einstein famously said, is "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. " By that definition, Dean (Josh McConville), the hapless hero of Australian time-travel romcom The Infinite Man , is bonkers, loco, loopy, barking mad. A brilliant, if absurdly obsessive scientist, Dean finds his noodle overheating when he falls head-over-heels for the girl of his dreams, Lana (Hannah Marshall). So he spends virtually every waking moment - and one imagines plenty of dream time - deploying his massive intellect to come up with ways to ensure Lana loves him back.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
One unexpected side effect of the writers' strike that has television in a sleeper hold is that I'm insanely grateful for the smattering of original programming still on the air. In other words, I'm enjoying Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles on Fox more, I suspect, than it deserves. But when it comes to killer cyborgs from the future, TV's Summer Glau has it all over the movies' Arnold Schwarzenegger. First of all, she's programmed with enough personality to pass herself off as a high school student.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Insanity," Albert Einstein famously said, is "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. " By that definition, Dean (Josh McConville), the hapless hero of Australian time-travel romcom The Infinite Man , is bonkers, loco, loopy, barking mad. A brilliant, if absurdly obsessive scientist, Dean finds his noodle overheating when he falls head-over-heels for the girl of his dreams, Lana (Hannah Marshall). So he spends virtually every waking moment - and one imagines plenty of dream time - deploying his massive intellect to come up with ways to ensure Lana loves him back.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
IN THE COSMOS of brainy cartoon dogs, Mr. Peabody remains unsurpassed. No less a pop-culture connoisseur than Seth MacFarlane acknowledged this in "Family Guy," when Peabody-inspired Brian took a time machine back to visit Christopher Columbus. Now the time has come for the tributes and references to give way to the real thing - a 3-D animated feature "Mr. Peabody and Sherman," adapted from the beloved '60s Jay Ward animated short about a time-traveling pedagogical dog and his adopted boy Sherman.
NEWS
April 29, 2013 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
There was a bully on Broad Street on Saturday, but he had nothing to do with hockey pucks. Rising 16 feet over the crowds in front of the Kimmel Center at Spruce Street, a T. rex showed his terrible teeth, roared a sort-of terrible roar, and wiggled his teeny, terrible forearms. Children thronged around him in amazement. Just across Spruce Street, crowds stared in fascination at a fenced-off gang of welders flinging sparks, shooting white-hot arcs of fire and twisting and soldering metal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
'If you had a time machine . . . " is the theme of the 2013 Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, now in its final week. Unvoiced is the rest of the question: ". . . where would you go?"
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The concept that unlocks the possibilities of time travel may remain obscure. But what we now know about time machines is that they take up a lot of space. One such specimen landed Monday morning in the lobby of the Kimmel Center as workers began assembling an enormous "interactive" time machine to be the centerpiece of the Kimmel's upcoming arts festival. With its time-travel theme, the 2013 Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts will frame performances and other events with time-related exhibits and activities experienced in the 100-foot-long cylinder.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Jake Blumgart
The story begins in the third-floor stairwell of the Fairfax apartment building in West Philadelphia. Chris Stevens and his friends met there to avoid disturbing his wife, a medical student who needs all the sleep she can get. The guys drank beers and brainstormed comic-book ideas. One took hold: classic fairy tales reimagined through a science-fiction lens. Once Upon a Time Machine was conceived in the summer of 2009, but it took until this autumn for the book, all 432 gorgeously rendered pages of it, to be born.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Festival of the Arts — the Kimmel Center-steered citywide outpouring of performances, exhibitions, wine-tastings, lectures, and film-screenings that culminated in a massive street fair at the end of its first incarnation in April 2011 — will be back. From the end of March to the end of April 2013, PIFA, as it's known, will unspool across about 50 venues in the city, according to J. Edward Cambron, the festival's executive director. Cambron pegged the budget at about $5.5 million.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
I AM A GUEST in Herb Mandel's time machine, which has landed us on 10th Street above Susquehanna Avenue in the Great Depression of the 1930s. Although Philadelphia and America were back on their heels, it was the happiest period of Herb's life, as childhood is meant to be. In the foreword to a self-published book of vignettes and watercolor sketches, the 85-year-old retired teacher and artist writes that "the reality of the Great Depression was...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
One unexpected side effect of the writers' strike that has television in a sleeper hold is that I'm insanely grateful for the smattering of original programming still on the air. In other words, I'm enjoying Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles on Fox more, I suspect, than it deserves. But when it comes to killer cyborgs from the future, TV's Summer Glau has it all over the movies' Arnold Schwarzenegger. First of all, she's programmed with enough personality to pass herself off as a high school student.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|