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Tin Angel

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1995 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
"My God, there's a little girl there!" exclaimed Francis Dunnery in a thick Irish accent from the stage of the Tin Angel on Monday night. He was eyeing a couple at the front table who had brought their daughter to the irreverent singer-songwriter's show. "That's half my show gone there. Put some earplugs in!" he continued, only half-joking. Thankfully, Dunnery didn't let her presence spoil his fun. He peppered a two-hour set of acoustic songs with off-color comments, uproarious observations and very personal stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1998 | By Fred Beckley, FOR THE INQUIRER
I assume my wife's typical on this point: When we can palm the kids off on a sitter, she rarely wants to go to a concert (because there are CDs) or a movie (because there are videos). Usually, it's a restaurant (because there is cooking). The exception is Grey Eye Glances, especially when the Philadelphia trio plays directly above a restaurant, as it did six times in three days last week at the Tin Angel. By Friday's final performance, the band had every right to be tired; instead, like any fine-dining establishment, it delivered.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Cellist Matt Haimovitz returned to what is usually a folk and jazz club, the Tin Angel in Old City, to complete what might be called his counterculture Bach cycle: the final three in the composer's six suites for unaccompanied cello. It's the summit of the cello literature, and Haimovitz, a now-grown child prodigy, has lived with it long, having recorded the suites a few years ago and, of late, played them on an extensive tour of clubs from Buffalo to Seattle. The idea behind the venues is to bring the music to people who might not normally encounter it. One strength of Thursday's recital, however, was that it drew classical-music people whose high attentiveness suggested a stronger-than-usual commitment to being there.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sometimes a unique voice - a boldly odd and enticing tone - comes along and yanks the most jaded listeners from their bubble of indifference. Think of the first time you heard Billie Holiday, Antony, Nina Simone, or Bob Dylan, voices that were/are captivating beyond the notion of being merely pleasurable. Count Tennessee-born Valerie June among those vocalists, with a creaking, emotive sound blending Dinah Washington's shushing jazz inflections and Dolly Parton's high nasal whine into an extravagantly funky chatter.
NEWS
April 19, 2010 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
On the whole, the fine art of stage banter is downright scarce in today's popular music - a shame. Eilen Jewell, the Boston-based singer-songwriter and tune-interpreter working freely across the wide realms of folk, country, blues, and rock and roll, is one performer who doesn't pass up such opportunity. Throughout Friday's set with her seasoned three-piece band at the Tin Angel, she took the time to connect with the crowd and set up songs - worthy endeavors that also helped establish the Idaho native's unique, low-key charm, bringing even her own talkativeness into her musing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With each album since 1999's Monday Morning Cold , Erin McKeown has crafted folk music with a twist. Her genre-jumping sounds increasingly have been enriched by country swing, Dixieland, conjunto, and bossa nova arrangements. And on 2013's Manifestra , her smartly lyrical songs had new, stronger political content. McKeown's is an elegant yet aggressive conversational voice, with a passion and poise that truly stood out during her packed-tight night at the Tin Angel on Friday.
NEWS
October 27, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Kolleen Bowers loves winter. That may be why the singer from Aldan dreams of moving to Alaska. "I have a fondness for the cold," she said. And it may be why her first song, "Big Fat Snowflakes," uses the imagery of falling snow as a metaphor for heartache. Bowers, 33, has written other songs with cold-weather themes - "Bon Hiver" (French for "good winter") is due out this spring on her independent release A Perfect Landing. She will perform these and other songs Thursday when she headlines at the Tin Angel in Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 22, 2007 | By Paul E. Simpson FOR THE INQUIRER
After 15 years as a major figure on the Philadelphia rock scene, former A?s lead singer Richard Bush decided it was time for a sabbatical. Just a little time off to regroup, maybe write some new songs; the year was 1993. It would be another 13 years before anyone in the public heard from him again. "He just called me out of the blue last fall and said he wanted to be a player again," recalls Tin Angel booking agent Larry Goldfarb. "I remembered him well from his days with The A?s; when they broke up, I booked his new bands a couple of times at the Empire Rock Club.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013
Kelly Willis and Bruce Robison In a preferable Austin, Texas-focused alternative universe, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw would be shunted aside and wife-and-husband team Kelly Willis and Bruce Robison would be the first couple of country music. Back in the '90s, Willis flirted with Nashville mainstream success, but the star-making machinery rubbed her the wrong way, and she brought her honkytonk angel voice back home to the Lone Star State and married Robison, a big, sensitive lug of a hardscrabble singer-songwriter who has scripted hits for George Strait, the Dixie Chicks, and, yes, Faith Hill and Tim McGraw.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | the Daily News staff
MUSIC Kids stuff The Fresh Beat Band will never win a Grammy for innovation. But for little kids getting into their sunny fluff on Nick Jr., they're a pop-rock force for good. Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden, 6:30 p.m. Friday, $39.50, 800-745-3000, livenation.com. Two peas in a pod Though years apart, Wreckless Eric and Amy Rigby enjoy quite the meeting of minds. He's a British punk-pop original of the Stiff Records era. Here, she's scored quite the cult following with bold confessionals - like those on her "Diary of a Mad Housewife" album.
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NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
The Black Dahlia Murder Melodic death-metal band that, like James Ellroy's 1987 novel The Black Dahlia , takes their name from the lurid killing of Elizabeth Short in Los Angeles in 1947. Touring behind their new album, Abysmal , with Fallujah and Disentomb. Sunday at Voltage Lounge . Archer Speaking of L.A. noir: Season Seven of Adam Reed's still-hilarious animated TV series is underway with the espionage agency formerly known as ISIS, led by bumbling superspy Sterling Archer, reconfigured as a private investigative firm caught in a mystery involving a familiar-looking body floating in a Hollywood swimming pool.
NEWS
November 4, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"I'm flamboyant," says the actor, model, musician, and reality TV luminary Cory Wade. "I'm a queen. And it's hard to hide that. " It's not necessary, either, especially with Wade back on the boards in Rent as Angel, a role he most certainly was born to play. "When Cory reached out to me, I cast him on the spot. I knew he would be a perfect Angel," Ritz Theatre Company director Bruce Curless says. "Angel is a beautiful person. And Cory reflects that, as Cory. " The personable performer, who's appeared on three seasons of the CW network's long-running America's Next Top Model glam-fest, is 6-foot-2, a willowy presence with electric-blue eyes and an even higher-wattage smile.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff, Daily News Staff Writer
NOW HERE'S something to dance about - the Hooters are returning to their home city of Philadelphia this fall to celebrate 35 years making music. The eclectic Philly band, known for its use of the melodica, produced some of the best songs of the 1980s, including "And We Danced," "All Your Zombies" and "Day by Day. " This week, they travel to Europe to begin touring, and in November they celebrate 35 years back at home. Tickets go on sale Friday at noon for a special 35th-year anniversary performance at the Keswick Theatre (291 N. Keswick Ave., Glenside)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
With each album since 1999's Monday Morning Cold , Erin McKeown has crafted folk music with a twist. Her genre-jumping sounds increasingly have been enriched by country swing, Dixieland, conjunto, and bossa nova arrangements. And on 2013's Manifestra , her smartly lyrical songs had new, stronger political content. McKeown's is an elegant yet aggressive conversational voice, with a passion and poise that truly stood out during her packed-tight night at the Tin Angel on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Josh Haden has had it good. The genre-bending bassist, singer, and songwriter has moved his band Spain through distanced, noir-pop efforts (as in 1999's She Haunts My Dreams ) tinged by abstract jazz and slow-core country toward the moody yet direct sound of 2014's Sargent Place . One of Haden's most haunting songs, "Spiritual," has been covered by dance-electro acts (Soulsavers) and classic C&W crooners (Johnny Cash). Plus, Haden was graced with a father, Charlie Haden (who died in July)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
'I'm not as good as I used to be at the late nights," Ben Watt sings in an autobiographical song about an aging DJ. He concludes: "I should douse my flame for the young man's game tonight. " "Young Man's Game," from Watt's new solo CD, Hendra , is wistful, bittersweet, and gently humorous. The music's gentle country twang contrasts with the lyrics' depiction of a club culture of Jäger-bombs and all-nighters. Watt recently halted his DJing career, but he's been active in other ways: Besides Hendra , his second solo CD, he has just published a second memoir, Romany and Tom . Tuesday, he begins a U.S. tour at the Tin Angel.
NEWS
August 18, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Sometimes a unique voice - a boldly odd and enticing tone - comes along and yanks the most jaded listeners from their bubble of indifference. Think of the first time you heard Billie Holiday, Antony, Nina Simone, or Bob Dylan, voices that were/are captivating beyond the notion of being merely pleasurable. Count Tennessee-born Valerie June among those vocalists, with a creaking, emotive sound blending Dinah Washington's shushing jazz inflections and Dolly Parton's high nasal whine into an extravagantly funky chatter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
In the late 1800s, Harvard University professor Frances James Child collected hundreds of lyrics and poems from the British ballad tradition. Published as Popular English and Scottish Ballads , they became known as the Child Ballads. The collection - five volumes of variations of 305 story-songs - has influenced generations of artists, from Bob Dylan and Joan Baez to Fairport Convention and Steeleye Span to the Decemberists and Fleet Foxes. Anaïs Mitchell and Jefferson Hamer recorded seven of them for their new album, also called Child Ballads , and their understated, direct approach stresses the captivating narratives of songs such as "Tamlin" and "Sir Patrick Spens.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013
Sara Watkins Her fiery fiddle and sweet singing helped propel the child bluegrass prodigies known as Nickel Creek into alt-country stardom. But Sara Watkins also has proven a formidable solo act in the five years since Nickel Creek split up. Her self-titled 2009 solo debut - produced by former Led Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones - proved she could go it alone with ease. Guest appearances on John Mayer's latest album, onstage with Jackson Browne (with whom she'll tour again this summer)
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