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Tin Cup

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Tin Cup, the golf movie from sports-obsessed writer-director Ron Shelton, Kevin Costner hits a birdie. That's a pelican, sitting on a country club pier, and Costner's Roy McAvoy - a beer-soaked has-been who, inspired by a winsome therapist, finds his way into the U.S. Open - drives a dimpled white ball right at the thing, from inside a bar, out through a door and under the limbs of a tree. It's one of the more accomplished feats that McAvoy, and Shelton, pull off in this likable but way too long romantic comedy that uses golf as a metaphor for life ("it's about gaining control . . . and letting go at the same time")
NEWS
August 16, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
They say brevity is the soul of wit. They also say George Bush can play a round of golf in two hours. That means he could play 18 holes in much less time than it takes to sit through "Tin Cup," an innocuous romantic comedy about a broken-down driving-range pro and his nutty therapist (Rene Russo) and a movie that unaccountably runs on for 130 minutes. When "Tin Cup" director Ron Shelton and star Kevin Costner first collaborated on the memorable baseball comedy "Bull Durham," they seemed to understand the benefits of efficiency.
NEWS
November 20, 2002
How much money should the grieving families of the Washington-area sniper victims receive? Is $5,000 enough? How about $50,000? Or how about nothing at all? . . . This latest rattling of the tin cup raises uncomfortable questions about whether we should be so quick to seek charitable resources for every new group of victims that violence and terror create. . . . [T]he use of donations as gifts for victims of violence isn't the best use of private funds. . . . We may end up creating a culture in which giving becomes too focused on injustices and tragedies, rather than on creating opportunities and innovations.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Actor Lou Myers, 76, best known for his role as ornery restaurant owner Mr. Gaines on the television series A Different World , has died. Tonia McDonald of Mr. Myers' nonprofit, Global Business Incubation Inc., said the actor died Tuesday night at Charleston Area Medical Center in West Virginia. McDonald said Mr. Myers had been in and out of the hospital since before Christmas and collapsed recently. An autopsy was planned. His TV credits included NYPD Blue , E.R. , and The Cosby Show . He also appeared in a number of films, including Tin Cup , and How Stella Got Her Groove Back . A Different World ran from 1987-93 and originally starred Lisa Bonet of Cosby fame.
SPORTS
June 9, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
TIGER WOODS had the most memorable last-place finish in the history of golf yesterday. Woods, who is reinventing his swing, shot an 85 at the Memorial in Dublin, Ohio, on Saturday, his worst single-day score in 20 years on the PGA Tour. He followed that with a 2-over-par 74 yesterday to finish a career-worst 14-over-par 302, his highest score ever in a 72-hole tournament. That puts him on par with Roy McAvoy, the fictional golfer played by Kevin Costner in the film "Tin Cup" for unforgettable closing rounds.
NEWS
July 31, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Say this much for "Swing Vote": It's different. Different, certainly, from the sort of political movie we've seen recently with "Wag the Dog," "Bulworth" and others. Most recent comedies have advanced the idea that sinister, powerful forces - abetted by the media and marketers - have co-opted the modern political process so it no longer serves the Average Joe. "Swing Vote," on the other hand, proposes that the problem is with the Average Joe. Or in this case, Bud (Kevin Costner)
SPORTS
October 29, 2000 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's a scene in the new movie The Legend of Bagger Vance in which Jack Lemmon, the narrator of this mythical tale of golf, wisdom and life, wonders aloud, "My wife asks me, 'Why do you play a game that seems destined to kill you?' " It's a good and reasonable question, not to mention a line that will no doubt elicit knowing chuckles from golfers everywhere, once the movie, starring Matt Damon and Will Smith, appears in theaters on Friday. Why do we play a game that seems destined to kill us?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Loosely speaking, there are two Kevin Costners. One is the self-effacing schlub of Bull Durham and Tin Cup, a winning loser who carries himself lightly. The other, the self-important somebody of The Postman and Waterworld, whose messianic heavyosity scuttles both films. Swing Vote, a disarming political satire perfectly calibrated to the national mood and to its revitalized star (who also produced), boasts a scruffy Costner as Bud, self-effacing loser. Because of a voter-machine malfunction, Bud can pick the winner of a hung presidential race that all comes down to New Mexico's five electoral-college votes.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By Mary Jane Fine, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mood hovered somewhere between nostalgia and back-to-the-future. Up on the stage stood the announcer booming, "LIVE from the COMMONwealth Ballroom of DUNfey's Hotel on City Line Avenue . . . " And down in the audience fidgeted four teams of teenagers, awaiting their debut on radio as "The Green Hornet" knew it. Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear . . . The event Monday night was WCAU-AM's second annual "Radio...
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Job description: Leader of the most powerful nation in the world. Perks: Big house. Walk to work. Private jet with snazzy official seal. Marine Corps Band on call. Annual salary: A measly $200,000 - less than the CEOs of Intel Corp., Coca-Cola Co. or General Motors Corp. Even a suburban Maryland superintendent of schools makes more. Recognizing that America's chief executive earns a pittance compared with his counterparts in business, entertainment, education, and practically every other field, the House of Representatives voted late Thursday to double the next president's salary.
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SPORTS
June 9, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
TIGER WOODS had the most memorable last-place finish in the history of golf yesterday. Woods, who is reinventing his swing, shot an 85 at the Memorial in Dublin, Ohio, on Saturday, his worst single-day score in 20 years on the PGA Tour. He followed that with a 2-over-par 74 yesterday to finish a career-worst 14-over-par 302, his highest score ever in a 72-hole tournament. That puts him on par with Roy McAvoy, the fictional golfer played by Kevin Costner in the film "Tin Cup" for unforgettable closing rounds.
NEWS
February 26, 2013
Actor Lou Myers, 76, best known for his role as ornery restaurant owner Mr. Gaines on the television series A Different World , has died. Tonia McDonald of Mr. Myers' nonprofit, Global Business Incubation Inc., said the actor died Tuesday night at Charleston Area Medical Center in West Virginia. McDonald said Mr. Myers had been in and out of the hospital since before Christmas and collapsed recently. An autopsy was planned. His TV credits included NYPD Blue , E.R. , and The Cosby Show . He also appeared in a number of films, including Tin Cup , and How Stella Got Her Groove Back . A Different World ran from 1987-93 and originally starred Lisa Bonet of Cosby fame.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Loosely speaking, there are two Kevin Costners. One is the self-effacing schlub of Bull Durham and Tin Cup, a winning loser who carries himself lightly. The other, the self-important somebody of The Postman and Waterworld, whose messianic heavyosity scuttles both films. Swing Vote, a disarming political satire perfectly calibrated to the national mood and to its revitalized star (who also produced), boasts a scruffy Costner as Bud, self-effacing loser. Because of a voter-machine malfunction, Bud can pick the winner of a hung presidential race that all comes down to New Mexico's five electoral-college votes.
NEWS
July 31, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Say this much for "Swing Vote": It's different. Different, certainly, from the sort of political movie we've seen recently with "Wag the Dog," "Bulworth" and others. Most recent comedies have advanced the idea that sinister, powerful forces - abetted by the media and marketers - have co-opted the modern political process so it no longer serves the Average Joe. "Swing Vote," on the other hand, proposes that the problem is with the Average Joe. Or in this case, Bud (Kevin Costner)
NEWS
February 22, 2006 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Efforts to keep money out of politics are usually cast as a great boon to the little guy - the one who can't cut a $100,000 campaign check, hire a battalion of lobbyists, or subsidize a vocal trade organization. So why was the latest shot in the war against local money politics fired by the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce - whose members include some of the biggest of Philadelphia's big guys? In interviews this week, a variety of city business leaders called the chamber's unanimous decision to have its members limit political donations to mayoral candidates to $2,500 a person or $10,000 a business or political committee a case of enlightened self-interest: an intersection of reformist ideals and more earthly motivations.
NEWS
November 20, 2002
How much money should the grieving families of the Washington-area sniper victims receive? Is $5,000 enough? How about $50,000? Or how about nothing at all? . . . This latest rattling of the tin cup raises uncomfortable questions about whether we should be so quick to seek charitable resources for every new group of victims that violence and terror create. . . . [T]he use of donations as gifts for victims of violence isn't the best use of private funds. . . . We may end up creating a culture in which giving becomes too focused on injustices and tragedies, rather than on creating opportunities and innovations.
SPORTS
October 29, 2000 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There's a scene in the new movie The Legend of Bagger Vance in which Jack Lemmon, the narrator of this mythical tale of golf, wisdom and life, wonders aloud, "My wife asks me, 'Why do you play a game that seems destined to kill you?' " It's a good and reasonable question, not to mention a line that will no doubt elicit knowing chuckles from golfers everywhere, once the movie, starring Matt Damon and Will Smith, appears in theaters on Friday. Why do we play a game that seems destined to kill us?
SPORTS
July 19, 1999 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the end, perhaps fittingly, it was a Scot, Paul Lawrie, who won the 128th British Open Championship. But not before Jean Van de Velde suffered one of the most stunning and heartbreaking final-hole collapses ever by a tournament leader. And not before Lawrie fired a career round of 67 to come from 10 strokes back and force a three-way playoff with Van de Velde and Justin Leonard that was nearly as dramatic as his comeback. "I feel pretty damn good, I've got to say," said Lawrie, 30, from nearby Aberdeen, who seemed to be in shock as he clutched the Claret Jug, which goes to the winner of the world's oldest major golf championship.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | By Elsa C. Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Job description: Leader of the most powerful nation in the world. Perks: Big house. Walk to work. Private jet with snazzy official seal. Marine Corps Band on call. Annual salary: A measly $200,000 - less than the CEOs of Intel Corp., Coca-Cola Co. or General Motors Corp. Even a suburban Maryland superintendent of schools makes more. Recognizing that America's chief executive earns a pittance compared with his counterparts in business, entertainment, education, and practically every other field, the House of Representatives voted late Thursday to double the next president's salary.
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