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Tin Machine

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NEWS
November 16, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
David Bowie returned to the Tower Theater last night with a bang. Tin Machine, the 44-year-old British rock aristocrat's latest - and loudest - band, opened its first North American tour at the Upper Darby theater, the recording site for his landmark 1974 David Live album. The four-piece band - featuring Bowie, guitar assailant Reeves Gavrels and sons-of-Soupie (and former Iggy Pop) Hunt and Tony Sales - had no trouble making a big, dissonant noise. And Bowie - who entered in a fluorescent yellow jacket with horizontal striped black and yellow pants and finished bare- chested - had no difficulty holding the crowd in his thrall with sheer charisma.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A rock star trying to halt a decade-long slide has several options: Do a hits tour, a "farewell" tour, or form a new band with the goal of updating the sound. David Bowie has been there, done that - and every strategy has failed miserably. So for the concert experience he brought to Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre Friday, he tried something even more transparent: He enlisted currently hot Nine Inch Nails as his opening act, desperately hoping that some of that band's credibility with the alternative-rock audience would rub off. It didn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
David Bowie is the ultimate Karma Chameleon. Before Madonna began shuffling looks with breathless abandon, before Mick Jagger first applied eyeliner, before Laurie Anderson's performance art, there was Bowie - seguing from alter ego to alter ego, vogueing before there was a name for it, wearing a dress to interviews. Was he gay? Straight? Bi? More style than substance? More marketing than music? Hurtling toward a premature, drug-fueled burnout? Who could tell? And that's the way Bowie loved it: Keep 'em guessing.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1989 | The New York Daily News, New York Post and Associated Press contributed to this report
GOSSIP TIME FOR DI The future of Princess Di's marriage is again the topic of gossip in London. According to British society columnist Nigel Dempster, Di is currently sporting a $125,000 Bijan watch, a gift from Spain's 51-year-old married monarch, King Juan Carlos. Asked about the trinket, a spokeswoman for the Fifth Avenue retailer remarked that Juan Carlos "does own some Bijan watches, but we know nothing about him giving one to the Princess of Wales. " COUNTING CHICKENS Eddie Murphy's latest flick, "Harlem Nights," could be good and it could be bad, but the star apparently feels his fans will lovingly pay to see it, regardless.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For the last night of its U.S. tour - Sunday at Mann Center's outdoor Skyline Stage - Queens of the Stone Age truly let loose. A frightening proposition, considering guitarist-singer-lead Queen Josh Homme and company always blast forth with the most dramatically stylized iteration of glam-inspired, stoner riff-rock since David Bowie started Tin Machine. But there was Homme, all 6-foot-4 of him, peering at the starry skies, lush greenery, and sold-out throng at his feet, and he was in awe. "All this in the middle of the city!"
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "I became a newspaperman. I hated to do it, but I couldn't find honest employment. " - Mark Twain A PROUD STRAIGHT, SELLECK SETTLES SUIT AGAINST GLOBE Such carryings on. Tom Selleck and the supermarket tabloid The Globe have settled his $20 million libel lawsuit, with the paper printing a prim and proper apology in yesterday's edition for implying that the extraordinarily handsome actor was gay. No money terms disclosed....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
During the '70s, David Bowie, Iggy Pop and Bryan Ferry made pop's boldest moves - electronic soundscapes, tart rock, Euro-disco, and soulful cabaret with lyrics that reeked of Dada and Beat imagery. They strutted in glitter and dyed hair when denim was the currency. Now, Bowie and Iggy, both 52, and Ferry, 54, are VH1 fare, and they're finding that it's tricky to grow old when you're odd and your greatest innovations are years behind you. The response: three former glam guys singing September songs in the autumn of their years.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"I'm already 50 years older, I'm already in my grave," David Bowie sings with a sly smirk, early in his stunning Madison Square Garden gala debuting on pay-per-view TV tomorrow night. To the contrary, the "Heart's Filthy Lesson" that Bowie imparts in this ironic song and his unsentimental killer of a "Very Special (50th) Birthday Concert" is that a rock-and-roll heart need never wither and die. Especially if the bearer keeps his keen ear to the ground, sharp eye on the horizon, and spirit chilled with cynicism, wit and experimentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Rumors of David Bowie's demise have been greatly exaggerated. It's been nearly 10 years since the most stylish of art-rockers released his last album, and nine since he suffered a heart attack backstage at a concert in Germany. That health scare was followed by a mysterious period of exile that gave grievous concern to fans who wondered if they would ever hear from the Thin White Duke again. But without warning, on his 66th birthday on Jan. 7, the classic-rock changeling took the music world by surprise by releasing "Where Are We Now?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
For the last night of its U.S. tour - Sunday at Mann Center's outdoor Skyline Stage - Queens of the Stone Age truly let loose. A frightening proposition, considering guitarist-singer-lead Queen Josh Homme and company always blast forth with the most dramatically stylized iteration of glam-inspired, stoner riff-rock since David Bowie started Tin Machine. But there was Homme, all 6-foot-4 of him, peering at the starry skies, lush greenery, and sold-out throng at his feet, and he was in awe. "All this in the middle of the city!"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Rumors of David Bowie's demise have been greatly exaggerated. It's been nearly 10 years since the most stylish of art-rockers released his last album, and nine since he suffered a heart attack backstage at a concert in Germany. That health scare was followed by a mysterious period of exile that gave grievous concern to fans who wondered if they would ever hear from the Thin White Duke again. But without warning, on his 66th birthday on Jan. 8, the classic-rock changeling took the music world by surprise by releasing "Where Are We Now?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
During the '70s, David Bowie, Iggy Pop and Bryan Ferry made pop's boldest moves - electronic soundscapes, tart rock, Euro-disco, and soulful cabaret with lyrics that reeked of Dada and Beat imagery. They strutted in glitter and dyed hair when denim was the currency. Now, Bowie and Iggy, both 52, and Ferry, 54, are VH1 fare, and they're finding that it's tricky to grow old when you're odd and your greatest innovations are years behind you. The response: three former glam guys singing September songs in the autumn of their years.
NEWS
March 7, 1997 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
"I'm already 50 years older, I'm already in my grave," David Bowie sings with a sly smirk, early in his stunning Madison Square Garden gala debuting on pay-per-view TV tomorrow night. To the contrary, the "Heart's Filthy Lesson" that Bowie imparts in this ironic song and his unsentimental killer of a "Very Special (50th) Birthday Concert" is that a rock-and-roll heart need never wither and die. Especially if the bearer keeps his keen ear to the ground, sharp eye on the horizon, and spirit chilled with cynicism, wit and experimentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1995 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
A rock star trying to halt a decade-long slide has several options: Do a hits tour, a "farewell" tour, or form a new band with the goal of updating the sound. David Bowie has been there, done that - and every strategy has failed miserably. So for the concert experience he brought to Camden's Waterfront Entertainment Centre Friday, he tried something even more transparent: He enlisted currently hot Nine Inch Nails as his opening act, desperately hoping that some of that band's credibility with the alternative-rock audience would rub off. It didn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1995 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Look out, you rock and rollers," prophesied David Bowie back in 1972's "Changes," a song title that summed up a career strategy in a word. "Pretty soon now, you're gonna get older. " Sure enough, it happened. The trailblazing changeling kept his audience guessing in the '70s: He was a rock star from outer space, an ambient noise pioneer, a Philly soul man (on Young Americans, recorded at Sigma Sound Studios, and David Live, caught at the Tower Theater). For the former David Jones, there was a new alter ego every year: Ziggy Stardust, the Thin White Duke, Aladdin Sane.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1993 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER Karl Stark and Dennis Romero contributed
During the last four years, David Bowie has vainly pursued success with Tin Machine, a pop project that appealed to just about no one. So it's some cause for celebration that Bowie has stepped up to the microphone alone this time out, unencumbered by his mediocre hard-rock band. Black Tie, White Noise (Savage/BMG ) is Bowie's first solo project since 1987's Never Let You Down. And with it, Bowie goes out of his way to win back his alienated fans by offering something to appeal to just about everyone, from florid soul balladry to bracing bits of murky, industrial-grade funk-rock that echo some of his finest work.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
David Bowie returned to the Tower Theater last night with a bang. Tin Machine, the 44-year-old British rock aristocrat's latest - and loudest - band, opened its first North American tour at the Upper Darby theater, the recording site for his landmark 1974 David Live album. The four-piece band - featuring Bowie, guitar assailant Reeves Gavrels and sons-of-Soupie (and former Iggy Pop) Hunt and Tony Sales - had no trouble making a big, dissonant noise. And Bowie - who entered in a fluorescent yellow jacket with horizontal striped black and yellow pants and finished bare- chested - had no difficulty holding the crowd in his thrall with sheer charisma.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "I became a newspaperman. I hated to do it, but I couldn't find honest employment. " - Mark Twain A PROUD STRAIGHT, SELLECK SETTLES SUIT AGAINST GLOBE Such carryings on. Tom Selleck and the supermarket tabloid The Globe have settled his $20 million libel lawsuit, with the paper printing a prim and proper apology in yesterday's edition for implying that the extraordinarily handsome actor was gay. No money terms disclosed....
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