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Tin Man

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SPORTS
October 18, 1996 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Only once in James Cosby's life have people gotten away with calling him brainless. That was last school year, when he played the Scarecrow in Thomas Edison High's production of "The Wiz. " "I can act. I can sing, too," Cosby said, laughing. "Aside from my speaking lines, I sang two solos and did a duet with the Tin Man. "I'm concentrating on football right now, but someday I might get into acting. It's a lot of fun. " Yesterday, Cosby, a 5-8, 165-pound senior quarterback, completed four of six passes for 129 yards and three touchdowns as the visiting Owls dumped Benjamin Franklin, 24-22, in an entertaining Public League game.
NEWS
November 30, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Media Theatre's holiday production of The Wizard of Oz - the live stage version - is the opposite of one of its characters, the Tin Man. It has a big heart. What it needs is a workable body. The heart - a fine cast of leads who sing and dance a live adaptation of the iconic 1939 film with brio - is probably enough for the kids, even if they watch Oz as if it were on a loop. They should react well to a live performance of L. Frank Baum's story of a girl and her dog, her knockout dream, the pals she makes, and the lessons she learns.
SPORTS
June 2, 2010 | by John Gonzalez, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - Michigan Avenue is where locals and tourists go to indulge. The drag is lined with high-end retail shops, bars and restaurants. People here refer to it as the Magnificent Mile. It could just as easily be called Busker Boulevard. When I went out for deep dish pizza the other day, I must have run into half a dozen street performers within three or four blocks of each other. There was the a cappella singer with a change cup who belted original tunes - "Treat me as part of your fa, fa, faaaammmmily" - and a guy standing on a milk crate outside the Gap telling jokes through a bullhorn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's the story of a poor Kansas farm girl, a flying house, talking apple trees and a cackling witch who dissolves in a pool of water. There are a road paved with yellow bricks, a city shimmering in emerald green and those shoes, glowing an irradiated, otherworldly, ruby red. It's a movie filled with images that have become icons, with lines of dialogue that have, over the last half-century, burrowed into the collective consciousness to the extent...
LIVING
December 9, 1994 | By Cheryl Lynne Potter, FOR THE INQUIRER
The main ingredient of artist Osman Karriem Hayes' art form is so exotic it can be found right there on the grocery-store shelf, in between such household items as plastic wrap, sandwich bags, and other paper products. And to most people, the thin, shiny sheets that are Hayes' principal medium are no secret ingredient at all: They're just plain old aluminum foil. It doesn't matter what name is on the foil package wrapper. Hayes, who calls himself a "tinfoil artist," is able to manipulate the silvery, pliable material into whatever character his fertile imagination suggests.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Dozens of writers, directors, filmmakers, and composers have adapted L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz for TV, stage, and film. I'm not going to pretend to know the differences that distinguish each version. But I will say that Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Wizard of Oz , now at the Academy of Music, offers a visually satisfying, much fuller musical take on this staple of American culture. Lloyd Webber based his show on the 1939 Judy Garland-driven film, keeping much of the plot and most of Harold Arlen and E.Y. "Yip" Harburg's songs intact.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - Gov. Corbett wept Tuesday night, but it wasn't over the election results. Midway through his concession speech, before about 200 supporters and banks of cameras, Corbett said he was most proud of the success he had during his term increasing services for people with intellectual disabilities. A little girl appeared on the stage at the Omni William Penn Hotel, tiptoed behind him, and reached for the hand of his wife, Susan. Her mother, standing just a few feet in front of the governor, burst into sobs.
NEWS
August 7, 2013
INNOVATION IS good, whether in business, government or politics. The late Steve Jobs reportedly said, "Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower. " So with some hope, but more curiosity, I attended Pennsylvania's first ever "Innovation of the Year" awards with Gov. Corbett last week in Harrisburg. This was to honor state workers with ideas to save tax dollars. It was a lively event. Some, not the guv, wore funny hats or costumes. One foursome dressed as Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow and the Tin Man, although I'm not sure why. I did wonder if the guv would recall a Daily News front-page image of himself as the Tin Man. If so, he didn't mention it. Maybe that's part of the new, new Corbett.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1992 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
The Friday Night Fights were a staple of early local television. A bunch of mugs would duke it out for paltry prizes, and every now and then, one of them would become a national contender. In 1992, TV has its Friday Night Fight, in which CBS and NBC have a host of new series to challenge ABC's long ratings dominance. Things haven't changed all that much in more than 40 years, however. The viewer still faces a bunch of mugs, with only one quality contender. Six shows premiere tomorrow night, one on ABC, two on NBC and three on CBS. One of the CBS shows, Picket Fences, is outstanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For Andrew (Robin Williams) - the NDR-114 robot who, in the not-too-distant-future of Bicentennial Man, becomes a walking, talking "household appliance" for an affluent family named Martin - time is endless. A similar experience - with seconds ticking away seemingly for all eternity - can be had by anyone who finds himself in the theater where this glossy, glop-headed ordeal of a movie happens to be playing. Spanning 200 years and deploying a good ton of aging makeup (See Sam Neill droop and deteriorate!
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
March 1, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Just beyond the door of Byron Fink's Washington Square condominium is a wonderland of objects. Beautiful objects, intriguing objects, some requiring his ready explanation of what they are and their history in his life. Fink is a collector who refuses to yield to limited space. He enjoys getting past the "wow" his possessions evoke and right to sharing his vast knowledge of - and affection for - the things that surround him. "I'm always asked why I crowd myself, and the answer is that I want to live - truly live - among the things I love," says this raconteur, who means what he says.
NEWS
November 6, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
PITTSBURGH - Gov. Corbett wept Tuesday night, but it wasn't over the election results. Midway through his concession speech, before about 200 supporters and banks of cameras, Corbett said he was most proud of the success he had during his term increasing services for people with intellectual disabilities. A little girl appeared on the stage at the Omni William Penn Hotel, tiptoed behind him, and reached for the hand of his wife, Susan. Her mother, standing just a few feet in front of the governor, burst into sobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Dozens of writers, directors, filmmakers, and composers have adapted L. Frank Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz for TV, stage, and film. I'm not going to pretend to know the differences that distinguish each version. But I will say that Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Wizard of Oz , now at the Academy of Music, offers a visually satisfying, much fuller musical take on this staple of American culture. Lloyd Webber based his show on the 1939 Judy Garland-driven film, keeping much of the plot and most of Harold Arlen and E.Y. "Yip" Harburg's songs intact.
NEWS
August 7, 2013
INNOVATION IS good, whether in business, government or politics. The late Steve Jobs reportedly said, "Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower. " So with some hope, but more curiosity, I attended Pennsylvania's first ever "Innovation of the Year" awards with Gov. Corbett last week in Harrisburg. This was to honor state workers with ideas to save tax dollars. It was a lively event. Some, not the guv, wore funny hats or costumes. One foursome dressed as Dorothy, the Cowardly Lion, the Scarecrow and the Tin Man, although I'm not sure why. I did wonder if the guv would recall a Daily News front-page image of himself as the Tin Man. If so, he didn't mention it. Maybe that's part of the new, new Corbett.
SPORTS
June 2, 2010 | by John Gonzalez, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHICAGO - Michigan Avenue is where locals and tourists go to indulge. The drag is lined with high-end retail shops, bars and restaurants. People here refer to it as the Magnificent Mile. It could just as easily be called Busker Boulevard. When I went out for deep dish pizza the other day, I must have run into half a dozen street performers within three or four blocks of each other. There was the a cappella singer with a change cup who belted original tunes - "Treat me as part of your fa, fa, faaaammmmily" - and a guy standing on a milk crate outside the Gap telling jokes through a bullhorn.
NEWS
November 30, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Media Theatre's holiday production of The Wizard of Oz - the live stage version - is the opposite of one of its characters, the Tin Man. It has a big heart. What it needs is a workable body. The heart - a fine cast of leads who sing and dance a live adaptation of the iconic 1939 film with brio - is probably enough for the kids, even if they watch Oz as if it were on a loop. They should react well to a live performance of L. Frank Baum's story of a girl and her dog, her knockout dream, the pals she makes, and the lessons she learns.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2009 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Although most of the public thinks of comic books as "kids' stuff," there are few titles being published for small children. Indeed, the average superhero comic is either too violent, sophisticated or boring for those 10 and younger. There are far more "Mature Readers" titles like "The Boys: Herogasm" (see below) than books like "Scooby Doo. " The convenient excuse is that with so many other entertainment options available to them, kids have left comics. In reality, comics have left kids - young boys and girls will happily read comics that are aimed at them and that engage them.
NEWS
April 5, 2008 | By Megan Kelsey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No need for a twister for the students of Sun Valley High School to feel as if they were stepping into the Land of Oz Thursday night, opening a three-day run thanks to the unlikely match of a Broadway producer and a first-year theater director. When they started three months ago, all those involved, including the students, doubted that they could pull together their first "big" musical production, of The Wizard of Oz. It involved 100 students from Sun Valley and Northley Middle School and 50 "munchkins" from the Penn-Delco School District's four elementary schools.
NEWS
January 21, 2000 | BY LOU PELUSO
Once again Philadelphians hear from those plant/tree-huggers of the Fairmount Park Commission, led by poster boy Barry the "Tin Man" Bessler, calling for another deer slaughter in our city parks. Pressured by the filthy-richites of Chestnut Hill, a/k/a Friends of the Wissahickon, who will not be outdone by some Bambi-loving animal-rightists, the "Tin Man" does what he does best - kisses their derrieres and requests a permit to begin another slaughter. Which will lead to another slaughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1999 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
For Andrew (Robin Williams) - the NDR-114 robot who, in the not-too-distant-future of Bicentennial Man, becomes a walking, talking "household appliance" for an affluent family named Martin - time is endless. A similar experience - with seconds ticking away seemingly for all eternity - can be had by anyone who finds himself in the theater where this glossy, glop-headed ordeal of a movie happens to be playing. Spanning 200 years and deploying a good ton of aging makeup (See Sam Neill droop and deteriorate!
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