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Tiny Tim

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NEWS
August 19, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Tiny Tim tiptoed to the altar for the third time yesterday. The 63-year-old falsetto singer was decked out in a purple tuxedo with red suspenders, and he carried his trademark ukelele. The bride, Miss Sue, 39, wore a flowing white gown, and appeared nervous before the wedding, her first. There'll be no honeymoon. After the wedding reception, he planned to retire to his room at the Mariott in Eden Prairie and allow Miss Sue to retire to hers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1988 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
No doubt you've asked yourself recently, "Whatever happened to Tiny Tim?" Well, maybe the thought never enters your mind, but just for the record, Tim is still tiptoeing through the tulips at various stages throughout the country, and his travels bring him to Bucks County tonight for an appearance at John & Peter's, 96 S. Main St., New Hope. Tim, who long will be remembered as the man who married Miss Vicki on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show in 1969, continues to sing with a shrill voice that sounds a bit like Frankie Valli hitting a high note while nursing a case of the jitters.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The striking woman stretched across the glass counter top at Aqua Luna is chatting with an inquisitive customer on the phone about her latest metamorphosis. In the air at the sunny-hued New Age boutique is the faint, sweet aroma of incense, stirred by a haunting refrain from long-dead Doors rocker Jim Morrison: "Break on through to the other side . . . to the other side. " At the back of the room, another specter - a flowing white bridal veil - drapes down from the ceiling and cloaks the small round table beneath it. The offbeat accouterments of this shopkeeper's present endeavor reflect uncannily her past.
NEWS
June 29, 1996 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tiny Tim, the tiptoe-through-the-tulips guy, was careening in a cart through the concourse of Philadelphia International Airport yesterday. But the big question still to be answered is whether he was driving. What police at the airport would say last night was that the long-haired, squeaky-voiced pop icon was the only occupant in the front seat of an electric-powered passenger cart when the cart ran wildly out of control in the Northwest Airlines section of Concourse E, hit two people and crashed into a wall.
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Tiny Tim is taking another plunge into the sea of matrimony. The long-haired, ukulele-plucking falsettist - whose age is somewhere between 65 and 73, depending on the source - made it official last week, announcing his engagement to Susan Marie Gardner of Minnetonka, Minn. Miss Sue, a Harvard-educated songwriter, is scheduled to become Mrs. Tiny Tim sometime this month in her hometown. The singer's first wedding, to his beloved Miss Vicki, took place 25 years ago on "The Tonight Show" with Johnny Carson.
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Irreverence, they name is Christopher Durang. Kicking the crutch out from under Tiny Tim, Durang's Mrs. Bob Cratchit's Wild Christmas Binge , a spoof of Dickens' famously sentimental A Christmas Caro l, is not nearly as amusing as it should be. And this is despite New City Stage's having assembled a large and impressive Equity cast. The show limps along (oops, sorry, Tiny Tim) under the slow and plodding (oops - did it again) direction of Michael Brophy. The idea is funny.
NEWS
January 12, 1993 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
The unlikely binding event of Barbara Lebow's new play, "Tiny Tim Is Dead," is an impromptu enactment of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" by a motley group of urban street people in the junk-and litter-strewn bay of an abandoned industrial site to which they have drifted for shelter. Lebow, best known for her sentimental ethnic drama "A Shayna Maidel," a runaway off-Broadway hit of the 1980s, is too smart at crafting plays to permit such an anomaly to throw her. Out of this jetsam she has fashioned a bittersweet fantasy that manages to convey a message as potent as her play is absorbing, even while giving off the aura of a work in transition.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Bah, humbug! The sentiments of Ebenezer Scrooge notwithstanding, Danceteller's adaptation of Charles Dickens' Christmas classic, A Christmas Carol, is a generally joyful affair that gets to the heart of the story with speed and verve. This production, which was presented last night at the Painted Bride Art Center and continues through tomorrow night, is a mixed-media piece combining Dickens' words with dance and pantomime. The script is by David B. Collins, and the choreography by Trina Collins, artistic director of Danceteller.
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | DAILY NEWS GRAPHIC
If it's for real and for ever, who's to say that anyone shouldn't be wed? Still and all, some celebrity love matches really don't click with their images or the public. Some of those we don't find out about until they're history. Here are a few marriages that have mixed us up over the years: Shannon Doherty and Ashley Hamilton Donald Trump and Marla Maples Liz Taylor and Larry Fortensky Roseanne Barr and Tom Arnold (and Kim Silva) Maria Shriver and Arnold Schwarzenegger Sean Penn and Madonna Sylvester Stallone and Brigitte Nielsen Herve and Camille Villechaize Prince Charles and Diana Spencer Cher and Gregg Allman Tiny Tim and "Miss Vicky" Budinger Ike and Tina Turner Mia Farrow and Frank Sinatra Ethel Merman and Ernest Borgnine Rock Hudson and Phyllis Gates (his agent's secretary)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
Let us consider what the season has to offer - besides the Black Friday shopping demolition derby, parties soaked with eggnog, and general frenzy wrapped in pretty paper and too many bows. Folks, there's fun to be had amid the madness of gift-buying and wrestling with tangled strings of lights. As ever, the region this year delivers a multitude of events, and, as ever, we're unwrapping the highlights (there are a lot of presents).   A Christmas Carol Charles Dickens' enduring 1843 tale becomes a tour de force when Scott Langdon performs every role, from Scrooge to Bob Cratchit to Tiny Tim (not to mention Fezziwig)
NEWS
December 3, 2012 | By Toby Zinman, FOR THE INQUIRER
Irreverence, they name is Christopher Durang. Kicking the crutch out from under Tiny Tim, Durang's Mrs. Bob Cratchit's Wild Christmas Binge , a spoof of Dickens' famously sentimental A Christmas Caro l, is not nearly as amusing as it should be. And this is despite New City Stage's having assembled a large and impressive Equity cast. The show limps along (oops, sorry, Tiny Tim) under the slow and plodding (oops - did it again) direction of Michael Brophy. The idea is funny.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
JUST IN TIME for Christmas, hardworking taxpayers Bob Cratchit and his family (the downtrodden American public) will be wondering what decisions Jacob Marley and Ebenezer Scrooge (Sen. Mitch McConnell and Rep. John Boehner) will be making about their economic futures. It will be interesting to watch how this modern-day Christmas story plays out. Will they side with the Cratchit family and Tiny Tim and raise taxes on themselves and banker Henry A. Potter (Wall Street CEOs)? Or, will they continue to require that banker Potter continue his Wonderful Life with his historic-low taxation entitlement?
NEWS
November 5, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
There are four ghosts in Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," but most movie versions have downplayed the story's pee-your-pants potential. That changes with "Disney's A Christmas Carol," a Robert Zemeckis animated movie that uses the latest 3-D and computer-graphic artistry to bring up the scare quotient in Dickens' classic story. If you're Marley's ghost, you haven't rattled chains until you've thrust them forth from a 3-D screen, held them in front of some kid's face and shaken them in 60-channel IMAX sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2008 | By Carolyn Davis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What do Arthur Godfrey, Tiny Tim and Will Brown have in common? If you're of a certain age, you can guess what it is. If you're 13-year-old Will Brown, your face takes on a just-sucked-lemons expression when Tim - may he and "Tiptoe Through the Tulips" rest in peace - is mentioned. "I hate Tiny Tim. He made a fool of the ukulele," Brown, who lives in Narberth, says before taking the stage at Ardmore's MilkBoy coffeehouse. "He made people think it's a toy, that it's something to be made fun of. " Rather, Brown says, cradling his own uke, "it's fun and there's just something about it that makes me feel good.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2008 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, For the Daily News
THE EIGHT YOUNG women in matching silver crowns squeezed neatly into the front couple of booths, giggling a bit and looking politely hungry for their steaks and subs. On that July day, the eight Miss America candidates - Miss Pennsylvania from the East to Miss Wyoming from the mountains - may have been the latest celebrities to hit Atlantic City's White House Sub Shop over the last 62 years, but they were certainly not the first. The walls of the White House are chock-full of photos, many ill-focused and faded, from performer Tiny Tim to baseball's Joe DiMaggio to comedian Bill Cosby to even the Beatles, chomping down on overflowing White House sandwiches.
NEWS
September 8, 2004 | By Daniel Rubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a late-night voice, a siren song from the left end of the dial, that began Lenny Kaye's 12-year obsession. I can't forget the night I met you . . . A velvety baritone rolling the words, an arm wrapping around the small of the back. Kaye, 57, the rock writer and faithful guitarist for Patti Smith, still has the notes he took during that drive on I-80 in New Jersey when he fell under the spell of the 1930s supernova named Russ Columbo: Rival to Bing Crosby . . . shot to death at age 26 by his best friend in a Hollywood bungalow . . . the death hidden for a decade from Columbo's fragile mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2003 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In the decidedly non-Dickensian introductory scene of the adaptation of A Christmas Carol Mum Puppettheatre is presenting, one puppet character mentions to another that death has a part in the play to come. Eerie music then fills the theater, and two spectral figures suddenly appear. "That's a bit odd," one puppet says, and the remark could well describe the script by local playwright Bruce Graham and the puppet theater's presentation of the perennially popular Charles Dickens holiday story.
NEWS
April 10, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
From wools to sharkskins to microfibers, Joseph N. "Tim" Nichols was always among the first to eyeball the new fashions coming into Boyd's men's store in Center City. Nichols, who worked in Boyd's stockroom for 50 years and followed local sports, died of heart failure Wednesday. He was 72 and lived in North Philadelphia. "It was a good job," said Nichols's brother, Wesley. "He didn't like real heavy manual labor. So he said he liked working in stock. Plus, I think he liked working downtown and around all those people.
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