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Tire Fire

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NEWS
November 13, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
About a dozen Tabernacle families were allowed to return to their homes early yesterday morning after being evacuated during a mammoth tire fire that was intentionally set Sunday. By 7 a.m. yesterday, about one million tires that had burned in the five- alarm fire were covered with dirt and sand by firefighters and employees of the U.S. Forest Service. Officials described the fire site off Goose Pond Road as a five-acre range of rubber tires piled as high as 30 feet in some areas.
NEWS
March 19, 1996 | By Larry Fish, Lea Sitton and Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The situation was hauntingly similar: a pile of tires, a fire, a highway closed. Investigators said yesterday's blaze near the Schuylkill Expressway in South Philadelphia shared yet another element with last week's tire inferno beneath Interstate 95: Arson. The blaze sent up a thick plume of smoke and disrupted midday traffic on the busy expressway for about an hour. But unlike the I-95 fire, it never posed a threat of structural damage, and the highway reopened in the early afternoon.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Michael V. Copeland, Special to The Inquirer
Falls Township officials are pleased with the way the new Community Alert Network functioned when a raging tire fire last week sent smoke and fumes drifting toward 2,400 homes. "I think we did pretty good for the first time using this system," Pat DiFrancisco, assistant to the fire marshal, said during an interview earlier this week. "The next day we received a number of calls from residents who were pleased with the system. " "It's a fantastic system," Fire Chief Michael McClellan said Tuesday.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Earlier this summer, a fire ignited in the junkyard at Marty's Auto Parts on Barnsboro-Blackwood Road. Fire officials said burning grass could have started the blaze, though no cause has been determined. Within several hours, almost 1,200 tires were engulfed in flames, sending a dense, black cloud over residential areas. Fire crews from Washington, Gloucester and Deptford Townships spent most of the day battling the fire. "It was of grave concern," Mayor Gerald Luongo said of the July 9 blaze, "because it put people in harm's way. " Township officials hope it will be their last major tire fire.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | by Jim Smiths, Daily News Staff Writer
Billy Harple, who was sentenced yesterday to seven years in prison for arson, thought of himself as a military general a couple years ago when he and his teen-age pals were setting fires in Port Richmond. A grossly overweight high school dropout working minimum-wage jobs, Harple awarded himself and his young accomplices imaginary "stars" every time they dropped a match in the dark of night in a Dumpster or abandoned car or vacant building. The fires, set in industrial sections bordering the gang's neighborhood, started off small but got much bigger and very destructive over a four-month period.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The huge tire fire that damaged Interstate 95 in March 1996 created headaches for more than 150,000 commuters. It angered residents in the area. It cost the city $6 million in repairs. But it jump-started Frank Plescha's business plan. He knew of a technology that could cleanly separate the steel center from the rubber on forklift tires. The process would allow recycling of both parts and keep some tires out of landfills. When the smoke cleared, he knew that was his cue to start his company, Thermal Flux Corp.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. contributed to this article
No lane closings today on I-95 in Port Richmond, the first time that statement has been true in more than four months. The final two lanes of elevated roadway between Bridge Street and Allegheny Avenue were thrown open after the evening rush hour last night just as quickly as crews could finish painting stripes and tending to other last-minute details, said Gene Blaum, spokesman for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. With that, traffic could finally resume the full-throated roar that only 150,000 daily cars and heavy trucks can generate.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Port Richmond man accused of being part of a gang that set fires in the members' neighborhood was indicted yesterday in federal court on charges of causing the destructive and costly tire fire that crippled Interstate 95 two years ago. William Harple, a heavyset 19-year-old with short hair and glasses, pleaded not guilty to two counts of arson and one count of conspiracy to commit arson. If found guilty, he could face a maximum of 60 years in prison. According to the indictment, Harple was one of seven teenage firebugs who set at least 13 fires in Port Richmond in the winter and spring of 1996, including the I-95 blaze.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / ERIC MENCHER
Reconstruction of the Interstate 95 section damaged by the March 13 tire fire entered a new phase this week with the placing of 21 support beams - at a cost of $15,000 each - to support a new roadway in the southbound lanes. Workers, shown yesterday above the new beams, will then pour concrete and go on to work on the northbound lanes. The rebuilding is expected to be finished by July.
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SPORTS
June 6, 2014 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
THERE IS a good chance that, at some point over the next few months, you will find yourself in a conversation with a Phillies fan who attempts to downplay the ugliness that awaits this organization in the coming seasons. That fan will invoke the mighty dollar, regurgitating the numbers that he or she has heard or read during the last year or so. Franchises like the Phillies do not rebuild. They blow up the roster, clear the debris, and start writing checks all over again. Look at the Red Sox. Look at the Yankees.
NEWS
September 2, 2011
Coincidence? Tire fire's timing is suspicious * Beach Street and Delaware Avenue, Fishtown Hmm . . . sounds fishy, and police agree. A fire was sparked on a massive pile of discarded tires in Fishtown yesterday - the same day the Daily News featured the dump site in its Marquis of Debris anti-litter column. Firefighters extinguished the blaze on the riverside edge of a vacant lot near Penn Treaty Park about 6:15 p.m. The fire was under control about 6:30 p.m., and there were no reported injuries.
NEWS
May 12, 2001 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Coworkers cried, accolades flowed, and flashing cameras lit the room. No wonder the guest of honor at yesterday's retirement party seemed overwhelmed. In the midst of the hoopla, the object of all this attention - a laid-back black Labrador retriever - sprawled on the floor and shut his eyes, a squeaky toy near his head. And thus Gentry, who will be 9 in July, marked the end of his career with the Philadelphia Fire Department. He hardly coasted into retirement - on his last day on the job, the department's "accelerant-detection canine" was called to two suspected arsons in Roxborough in the middle of the night.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Susan Q. Stranahan and Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Moose's men had vanished behind a wall of flame. On the industrial riverbank of Chester, a block-long warehouse roared with explosions and spewed noxious smoke. Fireballs somersaulted through its caving roof. Inside and out, stacked rows of rusting drums roasted in the heat. They swelled up fat, then blew and hurtled like 55-gallon missiles, spraying foul liquids. Staggering from the warehouse, retching and gasping for air, came Vincent "Moose" McLaughlin, 38, a tall, rugged fire captain revered by the men he now feared were lost.
NEWS
January 8, 1999 | by Jim Smiths, Daily News Staff Writer
Billy Harple, who was sentenced yesterday to seven years in prison for arson, thought of himself as a military general a couple years ago when he and his teen-age pals were setting fires in Port Richmond. A grossly overweight high school dropout working minimum-wage jobs, Harple awarded himself and his young accomplices imaginary "stars" every time they dropped a match in the dark of night in a Dumpster or abandoned car or vacant building. The fires, set in industrial sections bordering the gang's neighborhood, started off small but got much bigger and very destructive over a four-month period.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Napoleon has surrendered. The restaurant at 15th and Locust Streets, nearly enveloped for a year by the construction of a PATCO High-Speed Line elevator adjacent to its front door, will close after serving dinner Sunday, the owners said yesterday. "I'm losing $7,000 a week," said owner Dino Cataldi. "It's insane anymore to stay open. " But Napoleon will not go quietly. Earlier this week, Cataldi and partner Daniel Charest placed this white sign in a window: "On May 12, 1998 it will be exactly one year since the Patco/City of Philadelphia ADA elevator construction project began.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | By Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Port Richmond man accused of being part of a gang that set fires in the members' neighborhood was indicted yesterday in federal court on charges of causing the destructive and costly tire fire that crippled Interstate 95 two years ago. William Harple, a heavyset 19-year-old with short hair and glasses, pleaded not guilty to two counts of arson and one count of conspiracy to commit arson. If found guilty, he could face a maximum of 60 years in prison. According to the indictment, Harple was one of seven teenage firebugs who set at least 13 fires in Port Richmond in the winter and spring of 1996, including the I-95 blaze.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | By Karen E. Quinones Miller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About two years ago, people who live around 55th Street and Chester Avenue in Southwest Philadelphia began to notice a disturbing phenomenon - old automobile tires were mysteriously popping up in the community. When they called the city Streets Department to have the tires removed, one resident said, they found something even more mysterious and disturbing - no one seemed to care. "To them it's not a priority, but this is the neighborhood we call home, and we're out here every day trying to keep our community clean and safe," said Phyllis Walker, a resident of the 1500 block of Vogdes Street.
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Twice set afire, the five-acre field of 150,000 used truck tires in Richland Township is now being cleared. Late Wednesday, the property's owner, the Goodman Group, began shredding truck tires and hauling them, under the Department of Environmental Protection's supervision, to the Pottstown Landfill in Montgomery County. DEP operations supervisor Jim Pagano said a third of the tires on the site would be shredded and sent to Pottstown. They will be used as a liner below an expansion of the landfill.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The huge tire fire that damaged Interstate 95 in March 1996 created headaches for more than 150,000 commuters. It angered residents in the area. It cost the city $6 million in repairs. But it jump-started Frank Plescha's business plan. He knew of a technology that could cleanly separate the steel center from the rubber on forklift tires. The process would allow recycling of both parts and keep some tires out of landfills. When the smoke cleared, he knew that was his cue to start his company, Thermal Flux Corp.
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