FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 1987 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The operator of the damaged Three Mile Island nuclear plant disclosed yesterday that it was investigating allegations that a shift supervisor had slept on the job. Gordon Tomb, a spokesman for GPU Nuclear Corp., the operator of the plant, refused to say when the company first learned of the allegations. Tomb said that the shift supervisor, whose name was witheld, had been relieved of regular duties while the company was conducting an investigation, but remained on the payroll. Karl Abraham, a spokesman for the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, said similar allegations of sleeping on the job had been made on two or three earlier occasions against the same supervisor and had been found by the company to be without merit.
NEWS
August 7, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
A federal judge has barred operators of Three Mile Island, scene of the nation's worst nuclear accident, from random alcohol and drug testing of 450 union employees until an arbitrator determines if such tests are permissible. U.S. District Judge Daniel H. Huyett 3rd issued a preliminary injunction against the proposed random testing, which was to start Sept. 1, after a hearing yesterday in Philadelphia. While the injunction protects only about 450 union employees, a spokesman for GPU Nuclear, operator of TMI, said it is unclear whether as a result of Huyett's ruling the company will delay random testing of all 2,500 GPU Nuclear employees.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The accident at Three Mile Island has added nearly $130 billion to the cost of nuclear electricity in the United States, a nuclear economist said yesterday Charles Komanoff, director of Komanoff Energy Associates in New York City, said the overall cost of the 1979 accident amounts to about $500 for each person in the United States. Komanoff's estimates are based on the period from March 28, 1979, when the accident at Unit 2 occurred, through 1992. His estimates, which take inflation into account, were presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | By Julia C. Martinez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Personnel errors at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant have contributed to a decline in plant performance, according to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's latest inspection. Most of the mistakes occurred while the plant was shut down for maintenance and refueling and did not pose a threat to the health and safety of the public or to plant workers, Francis I. "Skip" Young, the NRC's senior resident inspector at TMI, said yesterday. "Performance was good while the plant was operating," said Young.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIDDLETOWN, Pa. - For the second time in two months, the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant has had an automatic shutdown. Plant officials say that the shutdown occurred at 2:20 p.m. Thursday and that the release of steam made a loud noise that nearby residents heard. Operators are trying to determine the cause. Exelon Generation spokesman Ralph DeSantis said a similar shutdown occurred Aug. 22. He said that there was no threat to public health or safety and that the shutdown did not interrupt electrical service.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
An arbitrator has ruled that operators of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant can't test employees for alcohol and drugs unless they have "reasonable grounds" for suspicion. Random testing of 450 union employees had been scheduled for Sept. 1 because management said it was necessary to root out drug abuse at the scene of the nation's worst commercial nuclear accident. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, contending the tests were an invasion of privacy, had obtained an injunction blocking the drug tests pending an arbitrator's ruling.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | By Susan FitzGerald, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cancer rates went up among residents living closest to the Three Mile Island nuclear plant several years after the 1979 accident there, but a new study says that stress, not radiation exposure, may have caused the increase. Researchers report in the June issue of the American Journal of Public Health that stress resulting from the near-meltdown of the Unit 2 reactor may have triggered "a small wave of excess cancers" in 1982 among people living within about 3 1/2 miles of the plant.
NEWS
July 25, 1986
In a report strikingly reminiscent of one issued in the United States nearly seven years ago, Soviet officials have determined that the April accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor was the result of human errors rather than mechanical malfunctions. The official statement, released last week by the Politburo, provided the most information about the accident to date. The massive release of radiation caused by the explosion and fire in the reactor - which has claimed the lives of 28 people, displaced 80,000 Soviet citizens, caused $2.8 billion in damages and spewed radioactive emissions that winds wafted around the globe - was caused by "a series of gross breaches" of rules by reactor operators.
NEWS
January 27, 1988 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Monitoring equipment used at Three Mile Island may be unable to accurately detect radioactivity and could hamper emergency relief efforts if there were another accident at the nuclear reactor, a new study has reported. The 500-page report by the Institute for Energy and Environmental Research, affiliated with West Germany's Heidelberg University, was the second major study released this month that determined the nuclear plant's radiation monitoring system was insufficient, despite improvements made after the accident on March 28, 1979.
NEWS
October 1, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission fined the operator of the Three Mile Island nuclear plant $40,000 yesterday for a "serious" violation of NRC procedures in the cleanup of the crippled Unit 2 reactor. GPU Nuclear, the operator of the TMI complex, said it would pay the fine. In a letter to the company, James Taylor, director of the NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, said GPU Nuclear violated procedures involving the main brakes of a massive crane, known as the polar crane, used to lift heavy weights inside the Unit 2 reactor building.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stop revealing things!!! We didn't want or need to know this, and now that we do, we wish we could un-know it. Kendra Wilkinson , former Eagles website blogger, and spouse of former Eagle Hank Baskett , dishes TMI to the Daily Mirror about her days at Hugh Hefner 's Playboy mansion in Hollyvoid. She confirms what we were afraid to know. She now says she didn't like it and was "usually drunk. " When she first moved in (2004), she was 18 and he was 78. Such degradation ensued that she instantly moved out five years later.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
TATTLE usually loves a celebrity with a big mouth, but Camden homegirl Tasha Smith really strayed into TMI mode recently when she told Wendy Williams about the lengths she's going to get pregnant. "I'm working on it, honey. As a matter of fact, I'll be ovulating soon. . . . Look, I count down my days of travel. During that time of ovulation, I stay home or I get home or stay home," shared Smith, who plays Angela on Tyler Perry 's "For Better or Worse. " "When you're 42, you've gotta pee on the stick, OK?"
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE STORIES told in Sarah Polley's family-secrets documentary "Stories We Tell" yield a trove of Too Much Information. Polley's the gifted actress-turned-director ("Away From Her") making the switch here to nonfiction, tracing her own lineage through the tangled relationships of a deceased mother she barely knew. Polley encourages relatives and friends to describe the late Diane Polley, a vivacious actress and casting agent, unhappily married (so we're told) to part-time stage actor Michael Polley.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIDDLETOWN, Pa. - For the second time in two months, the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant has had an automatic shutdown. Plant officials say that the shutdown occurred at 2:20 p.m. Thursday and that the release of steam made a loud noise that nearby residents heard. Operators are trying to determine the cause. Exelon Generation spokesman Ralph DeSantis said a similar shutdown occurred Aug. 22. He said that there was no threat to public health or safety and that the shutdown did not interrupt electrical service.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | Jenice Armstrong
NOT MUCH IS TABOO when it comes to sex these days. We have frank discussions about condoms, sexually transmitted diseases and homosexuality.   But women who touch their private parts and openly admit it? Nothing's more TMI than that. It's considered kind of trampy to even bring the subject up — much less wax enthusiastically about the joys of solo sex. "It's all skewed to make sure that you are virginal and pure until the right man comes along to awaken your sexuality and then you can sit back and he's going to take care of everything and he's going to know what to do," said Jill McDevitt, owner of Feminique Boutique, a feminist-oriented sex shop in West Chester.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I'm madly in love with my caring, funny, and stable boyfriend of over a year. We've been relatively drama-free, despite being long-distance the entire time. We were good friends before dating, so knew quite a bit about each other going into it, skeletons included. There's no doubt that without the foundation of friendship, our relationship would not be as strong as it is. But I've had issues in the past year assimilating some of the information I learned as a "friend" in my current role as the "girlfriend" - e.g., a good friend he referred to once as "the one who got away" in a night of drinking pre-dating, whom he's currently visiting in another town.
NEWS
May 9, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In April 1981, The Inquirer reported on an emergency exercise that Sydney W. Porter Jr. ran for the Salem Nuclear Generating Station in Lower Alloways Creek, N.J. "It was the first drill of such size to be conducted in the country," the story reported, "since the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) put new restrictions for emergency preparedness into effect" in the preceding week. In a foreshadowing of the March 11 tsunami's impact on the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plants in Japan, Mr. Porter said his 1981 exercise was meant to deal with "an incredibly unlikely scenario . . . sort of like having the Chicago fire, a tidal wave, and an earthquake happen all at once.
NEWS
April 26, 2010
RE THE April 22 letter from B. Parrish concerning people who don't stand for the national anthem during sporting events: I've been to many, many games and have seen people not stand during the anthem. That is simply ignorance, unless you're unable to stand. And if you can't stand, you should sit properly (not like you're lounging on the couch at home) and be silent. How about removing your hats, is that too much to ask? I'm sure, Mr. Parrish, you'd stand and cheer and show your respect to those rappers who drop the "f-bomb" every two seconds and tell our children it's cool to rape, kill and do God knows what else.
NEWS
November 25, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Naturally occurring radon and a power glitch caused radiation monitors to sound false alarms Monday night and yesterday morning at the Three Mile Island nuclear plant - and caused a fresh round of criticism for the plant's operators from Gov. Rendell. The false alarms were in the same Unit 1 containment building where a small contamination incident occurred on Saturday, Exelon Corp. officials said. Though tests showed no abnormal radiation, Rendell said Exelon had again failed to quickly notify state emergency-management officials.
NEWS
November 24, 2009 | By Mario F. Cattabiani and Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Amid renewed criticism from Gov. Rendell for a five-hour delay in telling emergency officials of a weekend radiation incident, Exelon Corp. said its Three Mile Island nuclear plant was "back to normal" yesterday. Ventilation fans probably caused the release of a small amount of radiation inside one building on Saturday afternoon, Exelon officials said. They said that the ventilation system had since been modified and that the 150 workers stationed in the building had all returned to work.
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