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NEWS
August 22, 2001 | By Peter J. Dawson
I should begin by admitting that I am a lawyer, so that readers have fair opportunity to accuse me of prejudice. Just because I am a lawyer, however, does not mean that what I'm going to say is nonsense and should be ignored. Probably many readers got hot under the collar when they read about the filing of a lawsuit against the Kellogg Co. after a house in Washington Township burned down, possibly because of the homeowner's failure to monitor the toasting of a flammable Pop-Tart.
NEWS
February 24, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talk about branding. Soon, fans will able to scorch a big 'P' - in the Phillies logo font - onto toast. No, we're not being wry. Use white or whole wheat, you like, although the 'P' might be hard to see on pumpernickel. Yes, an actual Phillies toaster is one of many new novelty items fans should find this season at the Majestic Clubhouse Store at Citizens Bank Park, most of them by April 1. "Now that's a hot item," said Francis Winkey, retail manager of the shop.
NEWS
July 28, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The next burning issue in the courtrooms of America may be a breakfast food left in the toaster too long. A Washington Township couple is suing the Kellogg Co. for $100,000 over a house fire they say was caused by a flaming Pop-Tart. Brenda J. Hurff put a cherry Pop-Tart in the toaster and then left the house to drive her children to preschool, according to the Hurffs' attorney, Mauro C. Casci of Leonardo, Monmouth County. The lawsuit was filed this week in Superior Court in Gloucester County.
NEWS
June 29, 1993 | BY DAVE BARRY
The thing I like best about being a journalist, aside from being able to clip my toenails while working, is that sometimes, through hard work and perseverance and opening my mail, I come across a story that can really help you, the consumer, gain a better understanding of how you can be killed by breakfast snack food. This is just such a time. I have received, from alert reader Richard Rilke, an alarming article from The New Philadelphia (Ohio) Times-Reporter headlined: OVERHEATED POP-TARTS CAUSE DOVER HOUSE FIRE, OFFICIALS SAY. The article states that fire officials investigating a house fire in Dover, Ohio, concluded that "when the toaster failed to eject the Pop-Tarts, they caught fire and set the kitchen ablaze.
LIVING
June 13, 2003 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brown it or burn it. Used to be those were the only things a toaster could do. Now, there are more. Many higher-end models can toast a bagel without scorching the outside. Some can warm pastries and baguettes, too. A handful have memory to recall various browning settings. You can even find a toaster that creates a sense of theater, with glass side panels that allow you to watch the bread move and brown as a motorized carriage carries it past the heating element (Applica's Arize by Black & Decker, $54.99, www.blackanddecker.
NEWS
February 20, 1986 | By Vic Skowronski, Special to The Inquirer
At flea markets throughout the Philadelphia area, they know him as "the toaster man. " When he walks by, the refrain is audible. "Here comes the toaster man," they say of B. Giberson, 65, a retiree who, for 13 years, has stalked flea markets for that humble kitchen appliance, the toaster, which he restores and collects in the basement of his home near here. He has about 2,000 of them. They come from Canada and the United States and from as far away as Germany and Japan, most dating from between 1908 and 1930.
NEWS
June 21, 1987 | By Rebecca Rubin, Special to The Inquirer
Ellynn Berger of Lafayette Hill was busy in her kitchen making her 5-year- old son a waffle when all of a sudden her toaster started talking to her. "It was blaring at me," Berger said of the incident that occurred in January. After putting her ear to the can opener, stove and other appliances in her kitchen, she realized that the toaster was giving her the weather report and news from around the world, and singing the jingles of local advertisers. But Berger was not as shocked as some people might be by a talking toaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Classical musicians await the Grammy Awards with the passion a retiree applies to watching his toaster work. The balloting system and the vagaries of nomination ensure a result as predictable as what pops out of the toaster - but without the warmth. No matter, the prizes are out. The innovative musicians who scuffled to fund recordings of contemporary masterpieces, the conductors who broke the rules and their budgets to record works that have been unjustly neglected, the passionate and the determined do not find their names or discs on this list.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
CONDOMS FOR WOMEN Women, condoms for you to wear appear closer to becoming a safe-sex option. They leak and slip less, and men prefer them to male condoms, according to studies done for Wisconsin Pharmacal Co., a would-be marketer. The female condom resembles the male version, except it's bigger and designed to slip inside a woman. It's made of polyurethane, a material Wisconsin Pharmacal says is stronger yet more sensual than the latex rubber used in most male condoms. More studies are needed before the Food and Drug Administration decides whether to license female condoms for sale.
NEWS
August 1, 2001
The Please Touch Museum probably had no other choice ("Please Touch and its embrace of the arches," July 26). McDonald's wasn't going to make a $5 million donation without negotiating naming rights. Marie Malaro criticizes the nature of modern-day philanthropy. Has Malaro ever looked at a museum's expense budget and tried to create a realistic funding strategy? It's not nearly as much fun to raise the money as it is to criticize an organization for not doing it right. The truth is that people need to be asked and offers need to be negotiated.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | Joy Manning
One recipe Basic Pie Crust ( recipe here ) Flour for the counter 1 large egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon water 6 tablespoons strawberry jam Powdered sugar   1. Prepare the pie crust in two discs according to the recipe, and refrigerate it for at least two hours and up to two days. 2. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 3. Roll the first disc of pie pastry on a lightly floured surface into a 9-x12-inch rectangle, cutting with the sharp knife any errant edges.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Joy Manning, For The Inquirer
If you want your friends and family to think you're a superstar at the stove, make them some crackers. It's a lot easier than it sounds. The "wow" factor stems from the simple fact that most people never consider making their own crackers, even though the ingredients cost just pennies and you can finish a batch in minutes. "Crackers are one of those things we automatically buy without thinking about it," says Alana Chernila, author of the new book The Homemade Pantry (Potter), which provides from-scratch recipes for dozens of typically store-bought items, including cheese, chai tea, and sauerkraut.
NEWS
January 28, 2011 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
In response to advice on how to clean a toaster oven, a reader in Chicago wondered how to clean the glass. The answer, from a reader in Baltimore, is "just use the cleaner designed for use on glass cooktops. I've been doing it for years - works every time. " Thank you. Question: I have a very expensive stone dining room table, imported from Italy, that has some type of finish on it. Recently, I discovered a ring stain from a glass. How can I remove this? I called the shop where I bought the table several years ago, but they were unable to help me. Answer: We have a polished-marble top on our dining room table (it took four movers to get it to this house from our last one 10 years ago)
NEWS
February 24, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talk about branding. Soon, fans will able to scorch a big 'P' - in the Phillies logo font - onto toast. No, we're not being wry. Use white or whole wheat, you like, although the 'P' might be hard to see on pumpernickel. Yes, an actual Phillies toaster is one of many new novelty items fans should find this season at the Majestic Clubhouse Store at Citizens Bank Park, most of them by April 1. "Now that's a hot item," said Francis Winkey, retail manager of the shop.
NEWS
June 4, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Most of the 7,000 full-time students who live on the University of Pennsylvania's West Philadelphia campus have gone home for the summer, but, oh, the things they left behind. There were 5,000 hangers, toasters, irons and TVs, coffeemakers and microwaves and kettles for tea. There were 12 pairs of crutches, mounds of pounds of clothing and 2,500 pairs of shoes; George Foreman grills, scales, blenders and refrigerators, too. There were boxes of books, Bibles, even the Quran; jewelry and Christmas lights and 400 lamps.
FOOD
November 3, 2005 | By Malina Brown FOR THE INQUIRER
My grandfather was nearly 80 years old before he stepped into the kitchen to do anything more than pop a couple of pieces of bread in the toaster for breakfast. Almost every meal of his adult life was prepared by my grandmother, whose two greatest culinary achievements were creamy mashed potatoes and Jell-O with floating banana slices. After my grandmother passed away, he realized he couldn't rely forever on the endless stream of tuna casseroles the elderly women of Century Village left on his doorstep.
FOOD
June 9, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Never underestimate the power of a home-cooked meal, especially if it's the sort of comfort food or ethnic specialty that connects you to your childhood and your roots. That's what inspires the ladies, and the occasional gentleman, of the Holy Rosary Society at St. John Cantius Roman Catholic Church in Bridesburg, who gather periodically, as they did a few weeks ago, to stock the church freezers with traditional Polish dinners. The women prepare the hearty, wholesome meals to augment more contemporary fare that younger parishioners regularly add to the church larder; together they sustain the homebound elderly in their community.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2005 | By Tony Gnoffo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They may be sleek, they may even be sexy. But when they're switched off, those coveted big-screen, flat-panel TV sets are just big black rectangles hanging on the wall. Now, to the rescue of the technologically endowed but scenery-deprived come a bevy of entrepreneurs with just the thing to brighten those idling $1,000-plus TVs: screen savers. Scenes of tropical fish, butterflies, waterfalls, even fine art are available on DVDs and other media to display on big-screen TVs when they are not showing news, sports and entertainment.
NEWS
October 6, 2004
THANKS MOSTLY to Pennsylvania's coal-fired utility power plants, the state's air, rivers, lakes and streams are loaded with pollutants that sicken us and reduces the life expectancies of 1,800 people a year. That's according to an unsettling report titled "A Breath of Fresh Air: How Smarter Energy Choices Can Protect the Health of Pennsylvanian" recently issued by the Physicians for Social Responsibility. "Except for North Carolina and Ohio, Pennsylvania releases more toxics - mercury, acid gases and toxic metals - into the air from coal-fired power plants than any other state," the report states.
LIVING
June 13, 2003 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brown it or burn it. Used to be those were the only things a toaster could do. Now, there are more. Many higher-end models can toast a bagel without scorching the outside. Some can warm pastries and baguettes, too. A handful have memory to recall various browning settings. You can even find a toaster that creates a sense of theater, with glass side panels that allow you to watch the bread move and brown as a motorized carriage carries it past the heating element (Applica's Arize by Black & Decker, $54.99, www.blackanddecker.
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