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Tobacco

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NEWS
April 25, 2003 | By Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Federal inspectors test imported tobacco for only a fraction of the toxic pesticides that are banned for use on U.S. crops, according to a General Accounting Office report released yesterday. GAO investigators recommended more complete testing, but they noted that the Environmental Protection Agency and many health experts say the risks from pesticide residues on tobacco are minimal compared with the other hazards of smoking. "When you smoke tobacco, you are exposed to so many more potent carcinogens than any pesticide," said Mirjana Djordjevic, a bio-analytical chemist at the National Cancer Institute's tobacco-control branch.
NEWS
April 29, 1986
About a month ago, an article by Ron Wolf appeared under the headline "A new pitch for tobacco: Jobs, GNP. " I could not respond sooner as I read the article in a hospital bed where I was being treated for lung cancer. It is tough to understand any society as advanced and sophisticated as ours fostering the cannibalistic nature of the tobacco industry. It literally says in this reported study by Chase Econometrics that it is OK to feed the gross national product and employment needs with the human flesh tobacco destroys.
NEWS
May 28, 1988
"WARNING: Smoking is addictive. Once you start, you may not be able to stop. " That's the warning label for cigarette packages that Sen. Bill Bradley (D., N.J.) has just proposed. It should be enacted into law after being amended to include Surgeon General C. Everett Koop's even more explicit warning that nicotine is "as addictive as heroin or cocaine. " That may strike the tobacco industry as a scare tactic, and that's just what it is. If it works, it may scare thousands of people into saving their lives.
SPORTS
November 21, 1995 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News sports writer Phil Jasner contributed to this report
It used to be said that North Carolina coach Dean Smith had more All- Americas on his bench than most teams had on their entire roster. There was a time Smith could simply out-talent opponents into submission. The prep All-America pipeline to Chapel Hill, N.C., extended from every corridor of the country. Flashing a UNC I.D. card virtually guaranteed an instant invitation into the home of any high school hotshot who even dreamed of dribbling a basketball on a college campus.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | By John Monk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The tobacco industry has sharply increased its contributions to the Democratic and Republican Parties since 1991, according to a report released yesterday by advocacy groups. The study also reported that aides to presidential candidates Bill Clinton and George Bush have close ties to the tobacco industry, and that the industry was pursuing government policies aimed at keeping tobacco largely unregulated. The report, released by the Public Citizen's Health Research Group and the Advocacy Institute, contended that the government's failure to limit tobacco sales had hurt the economy, driven up health-care costs and crippled the American family with tobacco-related illnesses.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By BOB WARNER & CATHERINE LUCEY, warnerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5885
A narrowly divided state Supreme Court has voided a 4-year-old city ordinance that was designed to curtail the use of cigars, cigarettes, rolling papers and other tobacco products as vehicles for marijuana and other illegal drugs, the court announced yesterday. The state's high court ruled 4-3 that the ordinance, sponsored by Councilman Brian O'Neill, was inconsistent with state law regulating tobacco products and drug paraphernalia. The Pennsylvania law has a broad prohibition against the sale of any paraphernalia used to grow, harvest, package or use illegal drugs.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Carol D. Leonnig, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here in the homeland of tobacco, where the golden leaf built the churches, the universities and the museums, North Carolinians have often rushed to defend their state's beloved crop. But as the tobacco industry and the state battle in court to stop federal regulation of tobacco, home-grown critics of smoking's health risks are shouting to be heard. The reason for their frustration? These North Carolinians say state leaders have long highlighted tobacco's monetary spoils and ignored its expensive ills.
NEWS
January 14, 1999
To the probable misfortune of Pennsylvanians, Common Pleas Court Judge John W. Herron made an expeditious decision yesterday to deny very credible parties - representing Allegheny County, 17 hospitals and public interest groups - the right to challenge parts of the $206 billion national settlement with the tobacco industry. Judges in some states have allowed outside petitioners to intervene, or they have altered terms of the settlement. The petitioners should waste no time in appealing Judge Herron's decision.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By W.D. EHRHART
Want to hear a good joke? The other day I passed a colorful billboard advertising cigarettes: Two very attractive young people - a handsome man and a beautiful woman - were laughing and having a wonderful time together, and in large letters the billboard proclaimed, "Alive with Pleasure. " Don't you get it? Let me give you a hint. Tobacco, mostly in the form of cigarettes, kills 434,000 people every year. How about this one? I recently heard a tobacco industry spokesperson say that if taxes on cigarettes are raised, cigarette consumption will drop, and that will put a lot of people out of work, people like convenience store clerks.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Bombarded with criticism from medical doctors and ministers, SEPTA's board is trying to undo a decision to permit tobacco and alcohol ads on SEPTA buses, subways and other property. Just a month ago, the financially strapped transit agency approved a deal with Transportation Displays Inc., of New York City, allowing TDI to sell advertising space on SEPTA vehicles and stations, with SEPTA to pocket 55 percent of all revenues - as much as $3 million a year. After a heated discussion last month, the board decided to permit advertising of tobacco and alcohol, but at no more than 20 percent of the total.
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NEWS
July 26, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
On ads inside SEPTA buses and subway cars, a giant, cuff-link-adorned hand representing the tobacco industry plucks a black teenager from a line of friends, leaving the chalk outline of the teen's body behind. "Our children are not replacement smokers!" a protest leader cries in a radio spot . " We have the power!" the crowd responds - which is exactly the point of this unusually aggressive new campaign targeting the tobacco industry's heavy marketing in low-income and African American neighborhoods.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - For another year, at least, cigar smokers can puff away tax-free. In the state budget deal signed Wednesday by Gov. Wolf, they escaped the fate of cigarette smokers, who will have to cough up an extra $1 tax a pack. Users of snuff and chew or loose tobacco will pay 55 cents more an ounce. The price of switching to vapor products and electronic cigarettes will include a new 40 percent wholesale tax. Just about everybody with a nicotine habit will be helping narrow the gap between money coming into state coffers and money going out - everybody but stogie lovers.
NEWS
April 24, 2016
Government health officials will team up with minor-league baseball in a $36 million campaign to discourage rural teenagers from using chewing tobacco. Baseball stadiums will feature the campaign's central message this summer - "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" - through advertising and promotions with players. The Food and Drug Administration says its latest effort targets white, rural males who are more likely to use dip, chew and other smokeless tobacco products. Mitch Zeller, director of the agency's tobacco program, said many young people don't understand the health effects of smokeless tobacco.
BUSINESS
February 4, 2016
Manufacturing output in Pennsylvania has surpassed prerecession levels. Not so in New Jersey, which is just beginning to recover. Category             Pennsylvania    New Jersey Total output (2014)       $79.62B          $45.93B Percent of gross state product             12.01             8.46 Firms (2012   )             12,796             7,450 Employment (2015)       569,700          247,400 Percent of nonfarm employment             9.74                6.18 Top three sectors          Chemicals          Chemicals (2013)
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
New Jersey lawmakers are considering a bill that would make the state the second in the country to raise the minimum age to buy tobacco products to 21. While health advocates believe the measure, if passed, would discourage young people from lighting up, the bill may face strong opposition in the Legislature. Currently, New Jersey is among four states and the District of Columbia where the minimum age to purchase tobacco is 19. The age is 18 elsewhere in the country including Pennsylvania, where a similar "tobacco 21" bill was introduced in October.
NEWS
October 20, 2015
ISSUE | CIGARETTE TAX An effective tool to combat smoking The commentary attacking cigarette taxes ("Cigarette-tax increases are bad for Pa. business," Wednesday) contained several inaccuracies. Studies have shown that cigarette taxes are an effective strategy for decreasing smoking and reducing smoking-related diseases and deaths. Research also shows that higher tobacco prices help to prevent people, particularly youths, from starting to smoke. While it is true that higher taxes lead some smokers to cross state or county lines for lower prices, most of those who continue smoking neither travel out of state nor seek smugglers to buy cigarettes.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WITH LESS than three months remaining in office, Mayor Nutter yesterday unveiled what is, perhaps, one of his boldest moves: legislation to ban the sale of tobacco products from any place where health-care services are provided and where pharmaceutical drugs are sold. That would include drug stores and grocery stores with pharmacies. The legislation, introduced on behalf of Nutter's administration by retiring Councilwoman Marian Tasco during City Council's weekly meeting, also would ban the sale of electronic smoking devices and unapproved nicotine delivery products.
SPORTS
April 14, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
CURT SCHILLING is striking out against chewing tobacco and peer pressure. Over the weekend, the former Phillies ace wrote an article for Derek Jeter's thePlayersTribune.com titled "Letter to My Younger Self. " "Dear 16-year-old Curt," Schilling began, "tomorrow at lunch, a kid is going to dare you to take a dip of Copenhagen. If you say yes, like I did, you'll be addicted for the rest of your life. Well, the rest of your life up to the point when you are diagnosed with cancer.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia added a new move to its fight against smoking Tuesday, recognizing merchants for ending tobacco sales. Seven business owners tell their end-of-tobacco-sales stories in a series of online videos posted by SmokeFree Philly, an antismoking project run by the city Department of Public Health. One said she chose to pull tobacco from her shelves after being a smoker herself, another after he developed emphysema that he believes came from secondhand smoke at his tavern. "Ethically and morally, it just wasn't right for me to carry cigarettes," Donna Horger, owner and head pharmacist at Brooks Pharmacy on Torresdale Avenue in Tacony, said in an interview.
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