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Tobacco

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NEWS
April 25, 2003 | By Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Federal inspectors test imported tobacco for only a fraction of the toxic pesticides that are banned for use on U.S. crops, according to a General Accounting Office report released yesterday. GAO investigators recommended more complete testing, but they noted that the Environmental Protection Agency and many health experts say the risks from pesticide residues on tobacco are minimal compared with the other hazards of smoking. "When you smoke tobacco, you are exposed to so many more potent carcinogens than any pesticide," said Mirjana Djordjevic, a bio-analytical chemist at the National Cancer Institute's tobacco-control branch.
NEWS
April 29, 1986
About a month ago, an article by Ron Wolf appeared under the headline "A new pitch for tobacco: Jobs, GNP. " I could not respond sooner as I read the article in a hospital bed where I was being treated for lung cancer. It is tough to understand any society as advanced and sophisticated as ours fostering the cannibalistic nature of the tobacco industry. It literally says in this reported study by Chase Econometrics that it is OK to feed the gross national product and employment needs with the human flesh tobacco destroys.
NEWS
May 28, 1988
"WARNING: Smoking is addictive. Once you start, you may not be able to stop. " That's the warning label for cigarette packages that Sen. Bill Bradley (D., N.J.) has just proposed. It should be enacted into law after being amended to include Surgeon General C. Everett Koop's even more explicit warning that nicotine is "as addictive as heroin or cocaine. " That may strike the tobacco industry as a scare tactic, and that's just what it is. If it works, it may scare thousands of people into saving their lives.
SPORTS
November 21, 1995 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News sports writer Phil Jasner contributed to this report
It used to be said that North Carolina coach Dean Smith had more All- Americas on his bench than most teams had on their entire roster. There was a time Smith could simply out-talent opponents into submission. The prep All-America pipeline to Chapel Hill, N.C., extended from every corridor of the country. Flashing a UNC I.D. card virtually guaranteed an instant invitation into the home of any high school hotshot who even dreamed of dribbling a basketball on a college campus.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | By John Monk, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The tobacco industry has sharply increased its contributions to the Democratic and Republican Parties since 1991, according to a report released yesterday by advocacy groups. The study also reported that aides to presidential candidates Bill Clinton and George Bush have close ties to the tobacco industry, and that the industry was pursuing government policies aimed at keeping tobacco largely unregulated. The report, released by the Public Citizen's Health Research Group and the Advocacy Institute, contended that the government's failure to limit tobacco sales had hurt the economy, driven up health-care costs and crippled the American family with tobacco-related illnesses.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Carol D. Leonnig, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Here in the homeland of tobacco, where the golden leaf built the churches, the universities and the museums, North Carolinians have often rushed to defend their state's beloved crop. But as the tobacco industry and the state battle in court to stop federal regulation of tobacco, home-grown critics of smoking's health risks are shouting to be heard. The reason for their frustration? These North Carolinians say state leaders have long highlighted tobacco's monetary spoils and ignored its expensive ills.
NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By BOB WARNER & CATHERINE LUCEY, warnerb@phillynews.com 215-854-5885
A narrowly divided state Supreme Court has voided a 4-year-old city ordinance that was designed to curtail the use of cigars, cigarettes, rolling papers and other tobacco products as vehicles for marijuana and other illegal drugs, the court announced yesterday. The state's high court ruled 4-3 that the ordinance, sponsored by Councilman Brian O'Neill, was inconsistent with state law regulating tobacco products and drug paraphernalia. The Pennsylvania law has a broad prohibition against the sale of any paraphernalia used to grow, harvest, package or use illegal drugs.
NEWS
January 14, 1999
To the probable misfortune of Pennsylvanians, Common Pleas Court Judge John W. Herron made an expeditious decision yesterday to deny very credible parties - representing Allegheny County, 17 hospitals and public interest groups - the right to challenge parts of the $206 billion national settlement with the tobacco industry. Judges in some states have allowed outside petitioners to intervene, or they have altered terms of the settlement. The petitioners should waste no time in appealing Judge Herron's decision.
NEWS
June 17, 1993 | By W.D. EHRHART
Want to hear a good joke? The other day I passed a colorful billboard advertising cigarettes: Two very attractive young people - a handsome man and a beautiful woman - were laughing and having a wonderful time together, and in large letters the billboard proclaimed, "Alive with Pleasure. " Don't you get it? Let me give you a hint. Tobacco, mostly in the form of cigarettes, kills 434,000 people every year. How about this one? I recently heard a tobacco industry spokesperson say that if taxes on cigarettes are raised, cigarette consumption will drop, and that will put a lot of people out of work, people like convenience store clerks.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Bombarded with criticism from medical doctors and ministers, SEPTA's board is trying to undo a decision to permit tobacco and alcohol ads on SEPTA buses, subways and other property. Just a month ago, the financially strapped transit agency approved a deal with Transportation Displays Inc., of New York City, allowing TDI to sell advertising space on SEPTA vehicles and stations, with SEPTA to pocket 55 percent of all revenues - as much as $3 million a year. After a heated discussion last month, the board decided to permit advertising of tobacco and alcohol, but at no more than 20 percent of the total.
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SPORTS
April 14, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
CURT SCHILLING is striking out against chewing tobacco and peer pressure. Over the weekend, the former Phillies ace wrote an article for Derek Jeter's thePlayersTribune.com titled "Letter to My Younger Self. " "Dear 16-year-old Curt," Schilling began, "tomorrow at lunch, a kid is going to dare you to take a dip of Copenhagen. If you say yes, like I did, you'll be addicted for the rest of your life. Well, the rest of your life up to the point when you are diagnosed with cancer.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia added a new move to its fight against smoking Tuesday, recognizing merchants for ending tobacco sales. Seven business owners tell their end-of-tobacco-sales stories in a series of online videos posted by SmokeFree Philly, an antismoking project run by the city Department of Public Health. One said she chose to pull tobacco from her shelves after being a smoker herself, another after he developed emphysema that he believes came from secondhand smoke at his tavern. "Ethically and morally, it just wasn't right for me to carry cigarettes," Donna Horger, owner and head pharmacist at Brooks Pharmacy on Torresdale Avenue in Tacony, said in an interview.
NEWS
August 31, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Curt Schilling blames his oral cancer on 30 years of chewing tobacco. While it is impossible to say for sure in any one person's case, that conclusion by the former Phillies pitcher is certainly plausible, cancer experts say. "I can't taste anything and I can't smell anything," Schilling said this month during a Boston radio telethon, according to MLB.com. Schilling, 47, retired in 2007 after 20 seasons in the major leagues, 81/2 with the Phillies. And he is unlikely to be the last to be affected, despite continued efforts by Major League Baseball to discourage the habit.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SIX MONTHS ago Curt Schilling announced he had cancer. Yesterday, he said he's suffering from cancer of the mouth and revealed what he believes is the cause: Chewing tobacco. "I'll go to my grave believing that was why I got what I got," he told WEEI-FM in Boston. "Absolutely. No question in my mind about that . . . I do believe without a doubt, unquestionably, that chewing is what gave me cancer. " Schilling said the cancer is in remission. He has, however, lost 75 pounds because he can't swallow.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Do traditional market indexes such as the Standard & Poor's 500 represent the soundest ways to track stocks? Are mutual funds and ETFs that invest in those index stocks the best for you? Maybe not. Many so-called alternative indexes have gained credibility, and investors, in recent years and may offer new options for market participation and growth. Firms have been adding them at a brisk clip. This June post at etftrends.com describes new ETFs (stock-like exchange-traded funds)
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
TWO PHILLY legislators yesterday called on the leaders of the nation's two largest tobacco companies to meet about their lobbying against a cigarette tax to fund the city's public schools. State Sens. Anthony Williams and Shirley Kitchen sent letters to Martin Barrington, CEO of the Altria Group, and Susan Cameron, CEO of R.J. Reynolds, asking for a sit-down with them and their Harrisburg lobbyists. The Daily News reported Thursday that those lobbyists had pushed for a five-year "sunset provision" to be inserted in pending legislation that would put a $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes sold in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE MARLBORO Man and Joe Camel helped push into legislative limbo a new $2-per-pack tobacco tax in Philly that would help to fund the city's public schools. Harrisburg lobbyists for the nation's largest cigarette company, the Altria Group - maker of the Marlboro, Parliament and Virginia Slims brands - initially had opposed the tax altogether. A lobbyist for the nation's second-largest cigarette company, R.J. Reynolds - maker of Camel, Pall Mall and Kool brands - also was involved in the effort.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Philadelphia was one Senate vote away from winning its $2-per-pack cigarette tax in the General Assembly on Tuesday. But after a late-hour lobbying effort by tobacco manufacturers, the senators jammed in a provision setting a five-year expiration for the tax. So, despite the prospect of delayed public school openings and hundreds of layoffs, the bill was sent back to the House, which had departed for its summer break and may not...
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal for the University of Pennsylvania to divest its $7.7 billion endowment from tobacco stocks died Friday without a vote by the board of trustees. Board chairman David L. Cohen said tobacco does not qualify as a "moral evil" - a criterion for divestment under Penn's policy - even though it causes serious health problems. "Let me be clear," Cohen said on the floor of the trustees meeting on campus Friday, "I am no friend of tobacco. I don't use tobacco products. I've never used tobacco products.
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