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Tobacco Companies

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NEWS
February 24, 1990 | By Charles Green, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Stepping up his anti-smoking crusade, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan accused tobacco companies yesterday of using "blood money" to sponsor sporting events, and he urged athletes to boycott them. Sullivan, the top federal health official, joined opponents of the Virginia Slims tennis tournaments in denouncing cigarette companies for using sports to promote their "deadly" products. "This blood money should not be used to foster a misleading impression that smoking is compatible with good health," said Sullivan, who has strongly and openly attacked tobacco companies in recent weeks.
NEWS
June 1, 1996 | By Ellen Goodman
And you didn't think it was possible for the tobacco image to sink any lower. Now Big Tobacco is the Evil Empire of a John Grisham novel. What next? A Stephen King film with a villain named Philip Morris? It's been that kind of year. With an antismoking president in the White House, with company memos leaking all over the media, with states suing for health expenses and smokers hiding in doorways, the tobacco executives will soon be slinking into work with trench coats over their heads.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2012 | By Matthew Perrone, ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON - Tobacco companies will be required to report the levels of dangerous chemicals found in cigarettes, chew, and other products under the latest rules designed to tighten regulation of the industry. The preliminary guidance issued Friday by the Food and Drug Administration marks the first time tobacco makers will be required to report quantities of 20 chemicals associated with cancer, lung disease, and other health problems. The FDA will require companies to display the information in a consumer-friendly format by next April.
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | By Murray Kempton
Rose Cipollone had always smoked Chesterfields. In the '50s, she took due note of the cancer scare and changed to L&M Filters, which the Liggett & Myers advertisements were recommending as "What the Doctor Ordered. " Public alarms about smoking would crest and ebb for the next 20 years while Rose Cipollone's disquiets obeyed their rhythms. Now and then she would try, and invariably fail, to leave off smoking. In the late '70s, she found that she had no further reason for vague worries about cancer of the lung.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | By GUY SMITH 4th
On May 30's Commentary Page, Ellen Goodman wrote an open letter to Guy Smith 4th, vice president of corporate affairs for Philip Morris Cos., commenting on a speech in which he called reporters "patsies" for antismoking advocates. She signed her letter "Patsy. " Here is Smith's reply: Dear Patsy: Many thanks for your column, written as a letter to me, replying to a speech I delivered at the Media Institute in Washington. That was the speech in which I charged that some of the press practice "double-standard journalism," skepticism not just toward the tobacco industry but toward business in general, and unquestioning acceptance of the critics of business.
NEWS
August 13, 1995
By cracking down hard on teenage smoking, President Clinton wisely rebuffed the tobacco industry's offers to bolster its own pitiful efforts to keep kids from smoking. In effect, Mr. Clinton concluded that industry execs expressing alarm at rising teenage smoking are about as credible as the police chief in Casablanca who pronounced himself "shocked, just shocked" at the gambling in Humphrey Bogart's cafe, then pocketed his winnings. There is little reason to trust the multibillion-dollar tobacco industry when it comes to teenage smoking.
NEWS
May 14, 1998 | By Raja Mishra, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Guatemalan Attorney General Aciscio Valladares Molina announced this week that his nation was suing Big Tobacco here, his speech in Spanish was peppered with a distinctly American noun: "Minnesota. " The settlement of Minnesota's lawsuit against the tobacco industry last week is prelude to a fresh round of lawsuits - lawsuits backed with voluminous evidence - that will continue regardless of what happens in Congress in coming weeks. Guatemala filed suit Tuesday, seeking about $800 million in smoking-related health costs.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | By Bob Geiger, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Clinton administration, in announcing new antitobacco rules Friday, watered down a plan that could have placed creative ads designed by anti-smoking groups on television programs watched by young people. Instead, the final plan calls for tobacco companies to craft their own advertisements and educational messages designed to make youths aware of the dangers of smoking. The Food and Drug Administration will monitor the ads to make sure they are working. Antismoking advocates and academics said that approach, which gives tobacco companies more control of the ads, was less likely to persuade notoriously independent teenagers not to smoke.
NEWS
July 11, 1998 | By Saundra Torry, WASHINGTON POST This article contains information from Inquirer wire services
With the collapse of a comprehensive tobacco bill, the nation's largest tobacco companies have been trying to negotiate a multibillion-dollar settlement of the dozens of state lawsuits pending against the industry. Industry negotiators met with lawyers from several states, including California, Colorado, New York and Washington, recently in New York to try to fashion a deal that could serve as a framework to settle all 37 pending state cases, according to sources familiar with the meetings.
NEWS
April 12, 1998 | By Robert A. Rankin and Else Arnett, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
At first glance, Big Tobacco's decision to fight Congress over national smoking legislation by mounting a public-relations campaign looks like a sure loser. But its fate will depend on how the issue is framed in the emerging public debate. President Clinton and both parties in Congress say the fight is about how to curb teen smoking. The nation's big cigarette companies say that assertion is just a cover story to mask what the fight is really about - a massive tax increase and expansion of big government.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
TWO PHILLY legislators yesterday called on the leaders of the nation's two largest tobacco companies to meet about their lobbying against a cigarette tax to fund the city's public schools. State Sens. Anthony Williams and Shirley Kitchen sent letters to Martin Barrington, CEO of the Altria Group, and Susan Cameron, CEO of R.J. Reynolds, asking for a sit-down with them and their Harrisburg lobbyists. The Daily News reported Thursday that those lobbyists had pushed for a five-year "sunset provision" to be inserted in pending legislation that would put a $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes sold in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Amy Worden and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Philadelphia was one Senate vote away from winning its $2-per-pack cigarette tax in the General Assembly on Tuesday. But after a late-hour lobbying effort by tobacco manufacturers, the senators jammed in a provision setting a five-year expiration for the tax. So, despite the prospect of delayed public school openings and hundreds of layoffs, the bill was sent back to the House, which had departed for its summer break and may not...
NEWS
July 2, 2014
ISSUE | LESSONS Fit for a crusade Although University of Pennsylvania trustees refused to divest stock in tobacco companies on the grounds that these companies' enterprises do not qualify as engaging in a "moral evil," the current history of tobacco control actually shows that the most effective strategies (domestic and worldwide) are those that make the issue a moral imperative. It is well documented that tobacco companies have been engaged in decades of deception in the growing, production, marketing, and sale of their products.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal for the University of Pennsylvania to divest its $7.7 billion endowment from tobacco stocks died Friday without a vote by the board of trustees. Board chairman David L. Cohen said tobacco does not qualify as a "moral evil" - a criterion for divestment under Penn's policy - even though it causes serious health problems. "Let me be clear," Cohen said on the floor of the trustees meeting on campus Friday, "I am no friend of tobacco. I don't use tobacco products. I've never used tobacco products.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few would argue that tobacco has any redeeming qualities, but is it a "moral evil"? That's the question members of the University of Pennsylvania's board of trustees likely will grapple with Friday when they consider a proposal to prohibit the investment of university endowment funds in tobacco products. The discussion follows an open letter signed by 530 senior Penn faculty members, urging divestment from tobacco companies, and a 17-page proposal authored by Penn professors and several others.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
E-DICULOUS. That's what vapers are calling a bill passed unanimously by City Council yesterday that adds e-cigarettes to Philly's existing ban on smoking. Council also approved a sister measure that bans the sale of e-cigs to minors. Councilman Bill Greenlee's proposal to regulate the product has been under fire for several weeks from advocates of e-cigs who've said the little electric invention has been a godsend. Greg Conley, a volunteer with the nonprofit research group National Vapers Club and an e-cigarette lobbyist, said e-cigs weaned him off smoking for good and probably saved his life.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A ruling last year that potentially stripped Pennsylvania of hundreds of millions of dollars it was getting as part of the sweeping settlement with tobacco companies was legally flawed, attorneys for the state told a Philadelphia judge Friday. Lawyer Robert Loeb said the arbitration panel of retired judges that made the decision last year was "bamboozled" by tobacco company attorneys who contended that Pennsylvania failed to enforce laws for collecting tobacco taxes and other payments.
NEWS
November 9, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane on Thursday asked a Philadelphia court to overturn a ruling that stripped the state of nearly $170 million in tobacco settlement payments. In a motion filed in Common Pleas Court, Kane argued that an arbitration panel's ruling last month that penalized the state for failing to "diligently enforce" laws requiring the collection of taxes and other payments from tobacco companies was unfair. "The arbitration panel's decision penalizes Pennsylvania for factors the panel clearly allowed for other states," Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG The state has frozen $100 million slated for health research, prescription drugs, and smoking-cessation programs because an arbitration panel slashed its share of the 1998 tobacco settlement that had been paying for the programs. In a ruling last month, the panel overseeing the multistate settlement found that Pennsylvania had failed to adequately enforce certain terms of the agreement with tobacco manufacturers. The arbitrators said the companies could cut their annual payments to the commonwealth by $180 million - or about 60 percent of the nearly $320 million the state had been getting every year.
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