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Tobacco Industry

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NEWS
January 1, 2012 | By Maria Cheng and Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - It's getting surprisingly easy to light up in the Netherlands these days - cigarettes, that is. Even as the Dutch government hardens its famous tolerance policy on marijuana, it is taking an increasingly relaxed stance toward tobacco, bucking the trend in nearly every other developed country. In 2010 it exempted some bars from a smoking ban, and now it plans to reduce spending on antismoking ad campaigns and end funding for health-care programs to help people kick the habit.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
When it comes to balancing the state budget, lawmakers continue to offer only one solution: Cutting services for Pennsylvania's most vulnerable residents ("House Republican plan may mean more funding for Pennsylvania schools," May 10). Legislators refuse to close corporate loopholes (although 74 percent of Pennsylvania corporations pay no income tax at all). They won't tax cigars and chewing tobacco, either (making Pennsylvania one of only two states that gives the tobacco industry a free pass)
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The head of cigarette-maker Philip Morris International Inc. told a cancer nurse yesterday that although cigarettes are "harmful" and "addictive," it is not that hard to quit. CEO Louis C. Camilleri's statement was in response to comments at its annual shareholder meeting in New York. The nurse, later identified as Elisabeth Gundersen from the University of California-San Francisco, cited statistics that tobacco use kills more than 400,000 Americans and 5 million people worldwide each year.
NEWS
February 4, 2012
A Washington consulting firm, Berman & Co., referred to in a story Jan. 20 on the New Jersey minimum wage as having clients in the tobacco industry, says it does not currently serve that industry. A caption Friday with a photograph of flowers in West Bradford Township should have noted that the flower pictured, a hellebore, normally is in bloom in February whatever the weather. That said, this is still a warm winter, and other flowers and plants have been budding out of season.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
No matter what else is sold at Philadelphia's corner stores, gas stations, and convenience stores, if they're licensed to sell tobacco, the main message on signs outside those stores is this: Buy cigarettes. So says a new study that finds the prevalence of those stores, and that message, in low-income areas helps the tobacco industry reach children in those neighborhoods long before they're old enough to legally buy its products. The study, being released Monday by the University of Pennsylvania School of Design and the city Department of Public Health, also found the stores where tobacco marketing is heaviest tend to advertise and display sugary beverages, candy, and chips - while healthier alternatives such as water, diet soda, and low-fat milk are rarely advertised, if at all. "It's stunning the number of tobacco outlets there are in Philadelphia," said Amy Hillier, an associate professor of city and regional planning at Penn's School of Design who directed a team of a dozen students and community members who set out to visit 4,639 licensed tobacco retailers over eight months starting in 2011 and ending in 2012.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2012 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Talk about a smoke break. Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless-tobacco products in the United States in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found. It's an unprecedented pause for an industry that historically has introduced dozens of products annually, and reflects its increasingly uneasy relationship with the Food and Drug Administration, which in 2009 began regulating tobacco.
NEWS
December 1, 1998 | By William T. Godshall, Robert B. Sklaroff and Jeffrey Barg
The proposed tobacco settlement should be rejected because it contains outrageous and unprecedented legal and legislative protections for the industry, shortchanges taxpayers and allows the tobacco companies to continue to prey on our children. Despite the conventional wisdom - fueled by the tobacco industry - that the settlement is a "done deal," it still requires court approval in each of the 46 states. Courts have set aside large class-action settlements before, and we believe there is more than sufficient reason for them to do so here.
NEWS
January 16, 1987
After reading the Dec. 28 Letter to the Editor from Susan Boyer, I had to reply to this grossly insensitive and unknowledgeable person. As a registered nurse she must have her head in a closet not to see the illness that smoking creates. But this is usually the case with smokers. They can't see past their addiction. If you have ever tried to get away from smoke, one would find it quite impossible. How many nonsmokers, sick with lung cancer etc., are actually second-hand smokers never able to get away from a smoking family, friends or work place?
BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | By Bill Arthur, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The tobacco industry spends $2.4 billion a year pitching its products, often in colorful, flashy advertisements showing beautiful, sexy, with-it young people cavorting at the beach, racing cars and driving speedboats. But a bill before Congress would virtually end that, limiting the industry to text-only ads. Gone would be the Camel from the Camel pack, the Benson & Hedges couple smoking in a hammock, the Marlboro Man. Instead, the ads and the cigarette packs themselves would have all the sex appeal of a legal brief.
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BUSINESS
April 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commonwealth Court on Friday upheld a year-old lower-court decision that restored $125.8 million in tobacco-settlement money to Pennsylvania. The money had been stripped from the state's share of a 2003 payment under the landmark 1998 agreement by major tobacco companies to compensate states for their health-care costs related to smoking. "We are very pleased with the Commonwealth Court's decision, which ensures the terms of the [master settlement agreement] are followed by the arbitration panel and that Pennsylvania is fairly treated under the terms of the agreement," Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in a statement.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal for the University of Pennsylvania to divest its $7.7 billion endowment from tobacco stocks died Friday without a vote by the board of trustees. Board chairman David L. Cohen said tobacco does not qualify as a "moral evil" - a criterion for divestment under Penn's policy - even though it causes serious health problems. "Let me be clear," Cohen said on the floor of the trustees meeting on campus Friday, "I am no friend of tobacco. I don't use tobacco products. I've never used tobacco products.
NEWS
August 27, 2013 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
No matter what else is sold at Philadelphia's corner stores, gas stations, and convenience stores, if they're licensed to sell tobacco, the main message on signs outside those stores is this: Buy cigarettes. So says a new study that finds the prevalence of those stores, and that message, in low-income areas helps the tobacco industry reach children in those neighborhoods long before they're old enough to legally buy its products. The study, being released Monday by the University of Pennsylvania School of Design and the city Department of Public Health, also found the stores where tobacco marketing is heaviest tend to advertise and display sugary beverages, candy, and chips - while healthier alternatives such as water, diet soda, and low-fat milk are rarely advertised, if at all. "It's stunning the number of tobacco outlets there are in Philadelphia," said Amy Hillier, an associate professor of city and regional planning at Penn's School of Design who directed a team of a dozen students and community members who set out to visit 4,639 licensed tobacco retailers over eight months starting in 2011 and ending in 2012.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2012 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Talk about a smoke break. Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless-tobacco products in the United States in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found. It's an unprecedented pause for an industry that historically has introduced dozens of products annually, and reflects its increasingly uneasy relationship with the Food and Drug Administration, which in 2009 began regulating tobacco.
NEWS
February 4, 2012
A Washington consulting firm, Berman & Co., referred to in a story Jan. 20 on the New Jersey minimum wage as having clients in the tobacco industry, says it does not currently serve that industry. A caption Friday with a photograph of flowers in West Bradford Township should have noted that the flower pictured, a hellebore, normally is in bloom in February whatever the weather. That said, this is still a warm winter, and other flowers and plants have been budding out of season.
NEWS
January 1, 2012 | By Maria Cheng and Toby Sterling, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM - It's getting surprisingly easy to light up in the Netherlands these days - cigarettes, that is. Even as the Dutch government hardens its famous tolerance policy on marijuana, it is taking an increasingly relaxed stance toward tobacco, bucking the trend in nearly every other developed country. In 2010 it exempted some bars from a smoking ban, and now it plans to reduce spending on antismoking ad campaigns and end funding for health-care programs to help people kick the habit.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By David Grande
If a pharmaceutical company offered me or any other doctor money to prescribe one of its drugs, we would be expected to reject it. Despite criticism from the Inquirer Editorial Board and City Council, Mayor Nutter's decision to reject an antiobesity program funded by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with money from the soda lobby is just as sound. Such industry support is designed to dissuade city officials from enacting a soda tax. Last year, when Nutter first proposed a soda tax, it was rejected by Council.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The images are stark, visceral, even disgusting. And that's really the point. Nearly a half-century after U.S. cigarette packs were emblazoned with their first, modest warning, "Caution: Cigarette Smoking May be Hazardous to Your Health," the Food and Drug Administration - at Congress' behest - is going graphic. It is requiring tobacco companies to print painful images, such as that of a man smoking through a hole in his throat or of a lip eroded by cancer and a mouthful of rotting teeth, right on their cigarette packs.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
When it comes to balancing the state budget, lawmakers continue to offer only one solution: Cutting services for Pennsylvania's most vulnerable residents ("House Republican plan may mean more funding for Pennsylvania schools," May 10). Legislators refuse to close corporate loopholes (although 74 percent of Pennsylvania corporations pay no income tax at all). They won't tax cigars and chewing tobacco, either (making Pennsylvania one of only two states that gives the tobacco industry a free pass)
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - The head of cigarette-maker Philip Morris International Inc. told a cancer nurse yesterday that although cigarettes are "harmful" and "addictive," it is not that hard to quit. CEO Louis C. Camilleri's statement was in response to comments at its annual shareholder meeting in New York. The nurse, later identified as Elisabeth Gundersen from the University of California-San Francisco, cited statistics that tobacco use kills more than 400,000 Americans and 5 million people worldwide each year.
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