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Tobacco Products

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BUSINESS
July 19, 1990 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clover, the discount-store division of Strawbridge & Clothier, said yesterday that it would no longer stock or sell cigarettes or other tobacco products after current supplies run out. The decision followed naturally from the stores' earlier decision to ban smoking by employees and customers in Clover stores and offices effective Aug. 5, a company official said. "We made the decision to have a smoke-free environment with our employees, and one thing led to another," said Robert Hofner, vice president for stores.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2012 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Talk about a smoke break. Tobacco companies have introduced almost no new cigarettes or smokeless-tobacco products in the United States in more than 18 months because the federal government has prevented them from doing so, an Associated Press review has found. It's an unprecedented pause for an industry that historically has introduced dozens of products annually, and reflects its increasingly uneasy relationship with the Food and Drug Administration, which in 2009 began regulating tobacco.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | By Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Suppose you're at a function sponsored by Temple University, but being held at an off-campus establishment. And you want to smoke. Well, you'll have to light up in the hallway or outside on the street. That's how far-reaching the no-smoking ban is that Temple implemented yesterday. No smoking in any campus buildings - not even in the restrooms. No smoking in classes, lecture halls, offices, hallways or dormitories. The ban even extends to university-owned vehicles and university-sponsored functions that are held off campus.
NEWS
October 8, 1997 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Life may soon get tougher for young smokers in Evesham. Under an ordinance introduced unanimously last night by the Township Council, minors - those under 18 - would face a warning, then subsequent fines if caught smoking in public, on school property or in open view anywhere. Even the possession of tobacco products by minors in open public view would be illegal under the ordinance. A first offense would result in a written warning that also would be sent to parents. Each subsequent offense would carry a fine of $50 to $500.
SPORTS
June 3, 1993 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Major league baseball has announced a sweeping ban of all tobacco products by all minor league personnel effective June 15. No cigarettes or any smokeless tobacco products will be allowed on the field, in the dugout or the clubhouse or on team transportation. At least partly because the ban doesn't extend to major leaguers, there was an immediate and predictable howl of protest from the younger players. "It's a violation of our rights," Scranton/Wilkes-Barre outfielder Tony Longmire, a smoker, told The Scranton Times before the Red Barons game against Columbus.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Michael Felberbaum, Associated Press
RICHMOND, Va. - Sales of tobacco to minors in the U.S. reached an all-time low in 2011 under a federal and state inspection program intended to curb underage tobacco use, according to a report released Thursday. The "violation rate," which measures retailers that were willing to sell tobacco to underaged youth, has fallen from about 40 percent in 1997 to 8.5 percent in the last fiscal year, according to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration. The rate is based on the results of random, unannounced checks to see whether stores would sell tobacco products to a customer younger than 18. In March, the U.S. Surgeon General said more needs to be done to keep young Americans from using tobacco, including new bans and increased taxes on tobacco products.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looking to better manage health-care costs, the Nutter administration is taking two big swings at tobacco. Come Jan. 1, Philadelphia will add a $500 annual premium to benefits costs for nonunion employees who use tobacco products, and a $15 surcharge for prescriptions filled at pharmacies that sell tobacco products. The charge on prescription co-pays is part of a plan being launched by the city in partnership with CVS Caremark, a pharmacy benefits provider owned by the parent company of CVS drug stores.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
A former Ridley Township police officer was found guilty of assaulting a Wawa clerk, the Delaware County District Attorney's Office said Monday. Brian Decker, 34, of Swarthmore, was tried before Judge Patricia H. Jenkins. He was off-duty when he struck a female Wawa manager who had requested proof of age when he purchased tobacco products in December 2009. The manager of the Folsom-area store was treated for a black eye and bruises. Decker was later fired. Jenkins found Decker guilty of simple assault and harassment, and set sentencing for November.
NEWS
December 9, 2003
IBELIEVE that the Philadelphia fails to fulfill its duty of prohibiting the sale of tobacco products and alcoholic beverages to minors. It is appalling that a great number of teens and preteens have easy access to such harmful substances. Over the years, I have seen advertisements against smoking, but there are still commercials promoting the consumption of alcohol. Nevertheless, it is easy for the adolescents of today to acquire tobacco products and alcoholic beverages. It disturbs me to see many of my fellow students smoking cigarettes after school or easily purchasing cigarettes at nearby stores adjacent to our school.
NEWS
March 24, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware County officials today announced the arrests of four Philadelphians in a four-county burglary spree targeting gas stations and convenience stores. The defendants stole and then resold cigarettes for cash to support heroin habits, officials said. The four were responsible for 17 nighttime burglaries in Delaware, Chester, Montgomery and Lancaster counties over a 10 week period, according to G. Michael Green, the Delaware County district attorney. The group would break a window or door at the store, steal tobacco products and be gone in minutes.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
We already know that the prospect of earning some cash helps people quit smoking. But a new study from the University of Pennsylvania found that the way cash rewards are structured can make a big difference in how well such programs work. People were far more likely to quit for six months if they had some skin in the game. The problem was getting them to invest some of their own money - they got it back if they stopped smoking - in a reward program. The results were striking enough, though, that CVS Health, which helped fund the study, is launching a deposit-based smoking-cessation program for employees next month.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia added a new move to its fight against smoking Tuesday, recognizing merchants for ending tobacco sales. Seven business owners tell their end-of-tobacco-sales stories in a series of online videos posted by SmokeFree Philly, an antismoking project run by the city Department of Public Health. One said she chose to pull tobacco from her shelves after being a smoker herself, another after he developed emphysema that he believes came from secondhand smoke at his tavern. "Ethically and morally, it just wasn't right for me to carry cigarettes," Donna Horger, owner and head pharmacist at Brooks Pharmacy on Torresdale Avenue in Tacony, said in an interview.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
A NEW TOBACCO-FREE pharmacy network is encouraging city employees to put the pack down. The initiative, called The Preferred Health Network, urges city employees not covered by union-based health benefits to get their medication at pharmacies that don't sell tobacco products. If the employees choose not to, they'll be charged $15 on top of their co-pays. In addition, any employee or employee spouse who has used tobacco in the last year will see a $500 annual increase in their health-care costs.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Looking to better manage health-care costs, the Nutter administration is taking two big swings at tobacco. Come Jan. 1, Philadelphia will add a $500 annual premium to benefits costs for nonunion employees who use tobacco products, and a $15 surcharge for prescriptions filled at pharmacies that sell tobacco products. The charge on prescription co-pays is part of a plan being launched by the city in partnership with CVS Caremark, a pharmacy benefits provider owned by the parent company of CVS drug stores.
NEWS
June 22, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposal for the University of Pennsylvania to divest its $7.7 billion endowment from tobacco stocks died Friday without a vote by the board of trustees. Board chairman David L. Cohen said tobacco does not qualify as a "moral evil" - a criterion for divestment under Penn's policy - even though it causes serious health problems. "Let me be clear," Cohen said on the floor of the trustees meeting on campus Friday, "I am no friend of tobacco. I don't use tobacco products. I've never used tobacco products.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few would argue that tobacco has any redeeming qualities, but is it a "moral evil"? That's the question members of the University of Pennsylvania's board of trustees likely will grapple with Friday when they consider a proposal to prohibit the investment of university endowment funds in tobacco products. The discussion follows an open letter signed by 530 senior Penn faculty members, urging divestment from tobacco companies, and a 17-page proposal authored by Penn professors and several others.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
THE MOST recent burning issue to be dragged before City Council resulted in both heat and light and a peculiar arrangement of the political constellation. Council was hearing testimony on whether electronic cigarettes, so-called smokeless cigarettes, which do not burn, should be treated the same as tobacco cigarettes, which do burn and emit smoke. Presenting the all-clear (among others) was Bill Godshall, executive director of SmokeFreePA, an anti-smoking organization opposed to the legislation sponsored by Councilman Bill Greenlee.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
In a city that has had trouble kicking the smoking habit, any step that promises to tamp down easy access to cigarettes - including a major pharmacy chain's recent decision to give up tobacco products - is a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, Mayor Nutter's proposal to raise a $2-a-pack cigarette tax, which was approved by City Council last year, remains stalled in Harrisburg. Besides the estimated $45 million a year it would pump into the treasury for city schools, the tax would be worth far more from a public-health perspective.
NEWS
February 10, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Few stores are as common and seemingly soulless as CVS. Even the name is beyond bland. Who can love a lump of letters? This quality is due in large part to the drugstore giant's numbing ubiquity, claiming every other corner. It's also because of what CVS has replaced, the beloved neighborhood merchant featuring a soda fountain and a pharmacist who knew your prescriptive needs. Yet CVS and other drug-chain monoliths pervade our lives. I shop there more than I care to acknowledge.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
DURING the last decade, local, state and federal governments have sought to make smoking inconvenient by restricting where and when people can light up. They have made it more expensive by increasing taxes. They have tried to make it scary by requiring ever larger and blunter warnings about the health risks of smoking on cigarette packaging. And they have worked to make it un-cool, most recently with a new advertising and social-media campaign this week aimed at teens. But even as the efforts to convince people not to smoke have gotten more aggressive, the smoking rate has remained about the same.
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