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Tofu

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FOOD
November 5, 1986 | By SONJA HEINZE, Special to the Daily News
Q. I bought a six-pack of Mauna Loa macadamia nuts in Hawaii and upon opening one of the cans by peeling back the sealed top, it let loose with a bang so loud I jumped a foot high. I didn't eat them, of course. Could they be toxic? They smelled funny, too. The other cans were all right. Connie Green Bloomfield Hills, Mich. A. Whenever you encounter anything out of the ordinary when opening a box, can or bottle of any product that is to be consumed, either return the product to the store or send a letter to the manufacturer stating when and where the item was purchased along with any code number stamped on the packaging.
FOOD
November 5, 1986 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Tofu is flexing its muscles. The spongy pillow of Oriental cuisine that once seemed condemned to a future of stir-fry and miso has turned into the chameleon of the food industry. Look around. It's being whipped into low- cholesterol alternatives to ice cream, pounded into meatless bacon strips, tossed into salads at trendy delis, and savored for its lack of fat and calories by the health-conscious everywhere. It's also one of the most versatile additions you can make to your pantry.
FOOD
August 17, 1986 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
Pesto, a summertime passion for many of us, has many virtues, including fast, easy preparation and great flavor. But a low calorie count is not normally among them. Made the traditional way with lots of Parmesan cheese, olive oil and pine nuts, the uncooked, basil-scented sauce for pasta can be a real jolt in the diet. Enter Pesto Nuovo. Our intriguing, equally fast and easy version of the classic Italian sauce has a secret ingredient - tofu. A square of the bland white bean curd, blended in the food processor with garlic, fresh basil, salt and a mere teaspoon of olive oil, makes enough smooth, creamy pesto for one serving of spaghetti.
FOOD
October 10, 1990 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Do you have a recipe for making your own frozen tofu? - Helen Dear Helen: Try this tofu-based frozen dessert for a non-dairy treat. In a blender or food processor, combine 2 cups plain tofu, 1 1/2 cups pureed fruit, such as strawberries or bananas, 2/3 cup sugar, 1/4 cup vegetable oil, 1/2 teaspoon almond extract and 1/8 teaspoon salt until smooth. Chill thoroughly, then freeze the mixture in an ice-cream freezer as you would ice cream. For a smooth, well-blended flavor, allow the finished frozen dessert to ripen, either packed in extra ice and salt in the ice-cream freezer or in a regular freezer for at least an hour before serving.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1990 | By Dick Pothier, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ready to feed your pets organic dog food and cat food - otherwise known as "dogola" and "catola" - spruced up with "miracle grain from the Aztecs"? Or, if you don't have any pampered pets, how about jazzing up your diet with such health foods as Zapata's Organic Tortillas or tofu hot dogs or organic bagels? At the big, weekend Natural Foods Expo at the Philadelphia Civic Center, there will even be a display of barley-grass and wheat-grass juices to help the hip unwind after a busy day. But most of the 700 exhibitors at the trade show, which is for marketers, dealers and distributors, display less-unusual wares, ranging from organic ice cream and dehydrated tomato snacks to huge collections of natural vitamins, herbal remedies, food supplements and organic vegetables.
FOOD
August 6, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
Grilling in some form or other is done in virtually every country. In recent years, our own country has experienced a veritable grill mania. Outdoor cooking is no longer just simple charcoal grills wheeled out on a hot summer evening. Elaborate gas grills are commonplace, and many homes boast a permanent barbecue pit as the focus for backyard entertaining. The casual ease of grilling makes it perfect for holiday weekends and get-togethers with family and friends. Cooking over hot coals or smoky mesquite imparts a unique flavor that cannot be duplicated indoors, and the opportunity to escape a hot kitchen at this time of the year is quite tempting.
NEWS
November 16, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Oscar de la Renta took a pie in the face from an animal-rights activist last week as he did a promotional appearance for his perfume line at a store outside Portland, Ore. "Shame on you for using fur," shouted Alison Green as she smashed the designer's face with a tofu cream pie. A police spokesman, who said Green may be cited for disorderly conduct, said de la Renta "cleaned up and came right back and continued signing autographs. " STEWART PORT The Los Angeles board of supervisors Wednesday voted to rename Los Angeles International Aiport after the late actor Jimmy Stewart.
NEWS
August 30, 1989
It's been going on for a few years now, the healthification of junk foods that are targeted at the aging Woodstock generation. First, it seemed they bleached the salt out of everything, including V-8 juice. Then the cholesterol started to go. Its absence now gets more ink on the labels than the presence of vitamins, protein, iron or energy. We noticed the corn-chip display, especially. Stamped prominently on the Tostitos bag was: "No cholesterol, never was," or something along the lines of Seven-Up's pledge on the caffeine front ("Never had it, never will")
NEWS
May 16, 2014
WHEN I gathered breakfast ideas from Philly vegans a few weeks back, I had to back-burner some interesting brunch suggestions to fit in all the harder-to-find early-morning items. "What about my favorite brunch spot?" came the outraged cries. And since V for Veg is nothing if not responsive, having cleared the table from breakfast, we'll now relax a bit, kick back and check out some later-morning meal options. Mi Lah (218 S. 16th St.) is a quaint but often overlooked spot that boasts the most venerable vegan brunch in town.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1989 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
Wok and Tofu, the plain-looking, wood-paneled restaurant on the southeast corner of 11th and Spruce Streets, certainly lives up to its name. Lots of fresh white tofu and a good number of stir-fries. This Chinese restaurant has been serving the neighborhood well for a little over a year. The food is decent and the prices reasonable, with the average entree pricing out about $5.95. If you are a lover of tofu and happen to be in the neighborhood, Wok and Tofu is worth investigating.
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NEWS
May 16, 2014
WHEN I gathered breakfast ideas from Philly vegans a few weeks back, I had to back-burner some interesting brunch suggestions to fit in all the harder-to-find early-morning items. "What about my favorite brunch spot?" came the outraged cries. And since V for Veg is nothing if not responsive, having cleared the table from breakfast, we'll now relax a bit, kick back and check out some later-morning meal options. Mi Lah (218 S. 16th St.) is a quaint but often overlooked spot that boasts the most venerable vegan brunch in town.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
Company description: "A shredded tofu braised with chipotle chilies, roasted poblano peppers and a blend of aromatic spices," available in a burrito or bowl. Chain: Chipotle. Calories: A serving of sofritas has approximately 145 calories, 11 grams of protein and 710 mg of sodium. Location: 4030 City Ave. Order time: Four minutes. Price: $6.45. Review: The nation's vegan-friendliest chain earned kudos this week by extending its test of sofritas from western U.S. locations to Chicago and many East Coast cities, including ours.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
IT'S A parental terror about as universal as stepping on a Lego barefoot: packing kids' lunches for school and day care. This month's Top Cook, Anita Garimella Andrews, has faced and conquered it. She had to. Because of the family's schedule, she packs three meals a day and two snacks for her 16-month-old daughter, Sanaa. "I think moms who have children who go to day care have similar things to think about as those of school-aged children," said Andrews. "What can I pack that's easy to do, healthful, will go over well and minimize mess?"
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By Matthew Nussbaum
I'm a Northeastern boy - born in Philadelphia, raised in New Jersey, attending college in Connecticut - but my blood flows from the Midwest. My dad is from small-town Indiana, my mom from rural Wisconsin, meaning that in matters of food, our tastes are relatively simple: meat and butter, toss in some cheese for good measure. Pop-up pizza casserole, seven-layer Jell-O, pigs in a blanket, baked mac and cheese, meat loaf, and mashed potatoes - these are among the foods on which I was happily raised, eating my way through childhood and adolescence.
FOOD
November 26, 2009
Makes 6 servings 1. Cut the block of tofu into six even slices and set aside. Using a food processor, mix the remaining ingredients into a paste. Rub the paste all over all sides of each piece of tofu and marinate for a minimum of three hours. 2. To make the dipping sauce, mix together ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, brown sugar, ginger, and lemon juice in a small bowl and set aside. In a small saucepan over medium heat, saute onions in olive oil until soft. Add the ketchup mixture and simmer for 30 minutes, adding small amounts of water as necessary if the sauce gets too thick.
FOOD
June 18, 2009
When Marie Kraft of Ambler was trying to improve her diet, tofu, the low-fat, high-protein soybean curd, was one of the foods she hoped to add. But she was vexed by the process of trying to squeeze the water out of it, a necessary step in improving the texture and taste. She searched the Internet for a gadget to make this easier, and found nothing, so she set out to invent her own. Her father, a retired engineer, helped with the first bolts-and-glue prototype, which she said was "just hideous" - the first in a series of designs.
NEWS
February 4, 2009 | By Christopher K. Hepp INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Any time the Chestnut Hill Local publishes a slightly left-of-center opinion piece, editor Peter Mazzaccaro can expect complaints and, occasionally, a particularly pointed putdown: "You must be a Weavers Way shopper. " Translation: You must be one of those Birkenstock-wearing, granola-eating socialists from Mount Airy's Weavers Way Co-op. As opposed to the more socially correct, politically conservative, staid inhabitants of Chestnut Hill. Well, for all those callers, fair warning: The Weavers Way food co-op and market is coming to The Hill.
FOOD
August 14, 2008 | By Maria Yagoda FOR THE INQUIRER
Summer is the perfect time for sitting under the cool shade of a pink umbrella, sipping lemonade, and listening to the pleasing lull of - no, not the waves on the beach, but the sizzle and clang of stir-fry. At the many ethnic food trucks frequented by students, professors, and workers in University City for 20 years, summer means shorter lines and quick service for the cheap and tasty fare that normally requires a wait of 20 minutes or more. While some Penn campus food trucks farther from the hospital work fewer hours or even close during the summer, there are still plenty scattered around serving menus ranging from vegetarian to Vietnamese.
NEWS
September 25, 2007 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
LOVE Park has figured in city founder William Penn's vision, city planner Edmund Bacon's college thesis, architect Vincent Kling's blueprints, and skateboarder Tony Hawk's video game. Visitors come from all over the world to see Robert Indiana's sculptural ode to the world's greatest four-letter word. The original-thinkers pose for snapshots in the open middle of it, their hands raised as if they're holding it up with their remarkably un-Atlas-like arms. Yes, that little park in the grand shadow of City Hall is a site of incalculable import.
NEWS
November 26, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
THEY ARE bomb-throwing Birkenstock brats. Wolves in hemp clothing. Enemies of scientific progress. Inveterate haters of humanity. They are environmental extremists and animal-rights zealots. They are running loose. And they are endangering us all. The national press, which has put a happy green face on the environmental movement for three decades, has largely ignored a recent rising tide of violence being waged by eco-nuts across the country and around the world. In August, someone planted explosives at biotech giant Chiron in Emeryville, Calif.
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