CollectionsTolerance
IN THE NEWS

Tolerance

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 15, 1996 | By Ellen Goodman
Are Republicans are going to tolerate tolerance? And how much of it. Can they agree to disagree on the subject of abortion? Last weekend, the Candidate-in-Waiting said that he wanted to add a generic, if coy, reference to the need for "tolerance" in the Republican platform. This was considered a subtle and savvy way to carve out a teensy piece of common ground on abortion in the churning party soil. But the Flap or Flip-Flap began when Bob Dole said that tolerance shouldn't just be relegated to the platform preamble.
NEWS
September 17, 2003
On Nov. 6, Voorhees will hold a public meeting on a proposal for a mosque on Berlin Road. The plan has been met with flyers warning of terrorists; an overflow crowd attended a zoning meeting on it. As the fallout from Sept. 11, 2001, continues, how do Americans reconcile their fears with their country's commitment to religious freedom and tolerance? Send your thoughts in a letter or short essay to South Jersey Voices, The Inquirer, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Is it "intolerable" to let Saddam build weapons of mass destruction, but "tolerable" to put up with North Korea? If so, does using the "I" word mean we're logically committed to doing something? What if we decide to tolerate the intolerable? Does that make sense? Is that the equivalent of saying "Live and let live"? Or is tolerating the intolerable itself intolerable? Hold that headscratching! Just when we need him most, give it up - your confusion, that is - to Swarthmore College philosophy prof Hans Oberdiek, the man who wrote the book on tolerance.
NEWS
November 5, 2010
RE FATIMAH Ali's Oct. 26 column: Is it tolerance or intolerance that allows you to pray to Allah five times a day? Or that allows your opinions in a newspaper column? The fact that NPR fired Juan Williams for sharing his feelings shows us the oxymoron that is "tolerant liberal. " Mr. Williams didn't toe the leftist line, therefore he was no longer tolerated and was a bigot. I'm right there with you, Juan - I also share those feelings. If it were the "acts of a few," it wouldn't be as big a concern.
NEWS
September 10, 2007
As students leave summer vacation behind and resume their reading, writing, math and science, many school districts struggle with how to teach the harder lessons required in their curriculums these days. By state mandate or societal necessity, they have to fashion lessons on conflict resolution, sex education, tolerance, diversity and anti-bullying - all while trying to respect parents' divergent views of morality. It isn't easy. No district discovered that more painfully last school year than Evesham in Burlington County.
NEWS
December 12, 1986
I applaud Thomas J. Tull's humor in saying, "If we find the men, hold them accountable and force them to support the children they fathered, the welfare system will do a vanishing act that would be the envy of Harry Houdini" (Op- ed Page, "Where are welfare fathers?", Dec. 1). Males are usually so tolerant of one another's sexual indiscretions while holding females culpable for moral lapses and illicit births, that I could hardly believe my eyes that a male actually wrote the article.
NEWS
August 9, 1996
As if there were any doubt, the convention platform committee this week showed the Republican Party - and the nation - just who's boss. And it's not Bob Dole. Led by Bay Buchanan - at least as fearsome as her big brother Pat - religious ultra-conservatives overwhelming rejected "tolerance," the word as well as the concept, from the party's platform plank on abortion. Even more, they rubbed the moderates' out-of-joint noses in it. After threatening a floor fight, moderates like New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman and California's Pete Wilson instead accepted a few words - in the appendix of the platform, where all the rejected amendments are dumped.
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The job of a graphic artist is to turn an abstract idea into a visual image that grabs your attention, sends a message, and sometimes changes your mind. Tolerance was the message sent by more than 300 students in a poster competition sponsored by the local chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts. The contest was the brainchild of graphic-design teachers and practitioners Frank Baseman and Mark Willie. Baseman teaches at Philadelphia University; Willie, at Drexel.
NEWS
December 9, 1997 | By Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can anything good come from the ugly threats directed at an African American family living in the Northeast? A Holmesburg civic group would like to think so. The Holmesburg Community Improvement Association is hosting a meeting of politicians and residents on Monday aimed at improving race relations in the Northeast. The goal is to develop strategies for preventing racist acts and to set up a committee to bridge differences among racial groups. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the Mount Zion Baptist Church at 8101 Erdrick St. The church has been among the few neighborhood supporters of James Daggett and his family.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Germany will issue a commemorative Thursday promoting improved relations between immigrants and citizens following ethnic and racial skirmishes. The 100-pfennig stamp depicts people of varying ethnic backgrounds holding a banner that reads "Living together!" In recent years, Germany has been the scene of attacks - some fatal - on foreigners attempting to blend into the nation's workforce. There has been a move to ban the entrance of any more foreigners. Shortly after World War II, Germany faced a shortage of workers, and between 1955 and 1973 recruited people from Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Greece and the former Yugoslavia.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 14, 2016
By Mark Tyler As I joined thousands of leaders and members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church at our bicentennial celebration against the backdrop of a nation in turmoil, a question floated in the air: Is there no balm in Gilead? The question is a verse in the Bible raised by the prophet Jeremiah and is timely after the tragic events of last week. We are a nation in search of a healing. Alton Sterling, a father of five, was shot and killed in Baton Rouge, La., when he was approached by the police.
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
King Firemarth is falling down a cliff. The drop is long, and the king is certain of his death until a friendly dragon scoops him up and deposits him safely on level ground. The unexpected rescue teaches Firemarth, who had previously feared the dragon - and all different-looking beasts in the kingdom - that "you shouldn't deny someone respect simply because they're different. " So goes The Legend of Firemarth , a children's book written and illustrated by Paulsboro High School sophomore Samson Beaver, who took home first prize this week in B'nai B'rith's "Diverse Minds Writing Challenge" in South Jersey.
NEWS
May 23, 2016 | By Diana Goetsch
Diana Goetsch is a writer in New York City and author of "Nameless Boy" Two and a half years ago when I began to transition, I was living in two genders, spending some days as Doug, some as Diana. I wasn't doing this out of curiosity or experimentation, as anyone aware of how dangerous it is to transition will attest. Rather, I knew where I was headed, and was carefully pacing myself, lest I go insane. If I needed to use a public restroom on Diana days I chose the women's room.
NEWS
May 17, 2016
By Susan McCarthy-Miller Long before Donald Trump arrived on the political scene, a two-pronged tempest of gargantuan proportion was gathering power in the form of "tolerable racism. " As President Obama assumed the highest political office in the world, the innermost feelings of our citizenry were slowly being roused by the election of a biracial Hawaiian. These heretofore broad-minded voters were now accessing their deepest racially prejudiced feelings, long tamped down in the name of political correctness, social harmony, and high-minded tolerance.
NEWS
January 12, 2016
ISSUE | PRESS FREEDOM Poor perspective As celebrated as Central High School is, senior Michael Moroz somehow missed the lesson about a person being presumed innocent until proven guilty ("Getting lesson in intolerance," Wednesday). Michael Brown, the Ferguson, Mo., teenager who was shot and killed by police, had never been found guilty of anything. Being a "delinquent" or a "thug," which is what Moroz called Brown in a commentary in the school newspaper, is not a reason to be murdered by police or anyone else.
NEWS
September 27, 2015 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing before Independence Hall, Pope Francis praised America's tradition of religious tolerance and called on members of all faiths to be a voice for those who are "unable to be heard. " "I take this opportunity to thank all those, of whatever religion, who have sought to serve the God of peace by building cities of brotherly love, by caring for our neighbors in need, by defending the dignity of God's gift of life in all its stages, by defending the cause of the poor and the immigrant," the pope said.
FOOD
September 4, 2015 | Samantha Melamed
Which are you? It's a decision every Philadelphian has to make for him or herself: Wit or witout. Show your tolerance (and love for cheesesteaks) with this instant-classic T-shirt from local designer Philly Phaithful. -  Samantha Melamed  "I can't live" T-shirt, $24.99 at  Phillyphaithful.com   Salt, pepper and ... habanero? Northern Liberties spice maker Saint Lucifer is determined to one-up Old Bay with its own special spice blend - a hot, salty, garlicky powder the makers think should sit next to salt and pepper on every table in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
THEY CALLED it "The Hamptons Meet Philly," and the white linen- and seersucker-clad 10th-anniversary cocktail party celebrating Anthony Henderson and Jason Strong 's decade together went off without a hitch this weekend. Henderson is a longtime celebrity fashion stylist who balances his time between Philly and L.A., and has been doing wardrobe dressing for the Daily News ' Sexy Singles for more than a decade. Strong is an LGBT activist. Together, the couple has a 4-year-old adopted son, Marcelino . After meeting on a dating website more than a decade ago, they've outlasted many of their gay and straight couple counterparts.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Last month, for the second time in 18 months, former Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb was arrested in Arizona for driving under the influence. According to police investigators, McNabb was caught driving with a blood-alcohol concentration of 0.171 percent, twice the legal limit. In a video of his arrest, McNabb contends he was on cold medication. McNabb's arrest shines a spotlight on the issue of repeat DUIs. "Anyone can have one DUI," said Helen Weigand, director of DUI services at Livengrin Foundation, a nonprofit addiction-recovery center based in Bensalem, who lost her 22-year-old daughter 20 years ago to a crash involving a drunken driver.
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When a smug political machine sends dutiful functionaries to Harrisburg whose chief responsibilities are to back the party, vote as instructed when instructed, and collect a paycheck, it should come as no surprise when arrests occur. Democratic State Reps. Louise Bishop, Michelle Brownlee, Ronald Waters, and Vanessa Lowery Brown, all of Philadelphia, didn't have the decency to resign after The Inquirer reported in March 2014 that they had been recorded taking cash from an undercover informant in a sting conducted by the state Attorney General's Office.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|