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Tolerance

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NEWS
June 15, 1996 | By Ellen Goodman
Are Republicans are going to tolerate tolerance? And how much of it. Can they agree to disagree on the subject of abortion? Last weekend, the Candidate-in-Waiting said that he wanted to add a generic, if coy, reference to the need for "tolerance" in the Republican platform. This was considered a subtle and savvy way to carve out a teensy piece of common ground on abortion in the churning party soil. But the Flap or Flip-Flap began when Bob Dole said that tolerance shouldn't just be relegated to the platform preamble.
NEWS
September 17, 2003
On Nov. 6, Voorhees will hold a public meeting on a proposal for a mosque on Berlin Road. The plan has been met with flyers warning of terrorists; an overflow crowd attended a zoning meeting on it. As the fallout from Sept. 11, 2001, continues, how do Americans reconcile their fears with their country's commitment to religious freedom and tolerance? Send your thoughts in a letter or short essay to South Jersey Voices, The Inquirer, 53 Haddonfield Rd., Suite 300, Cherry Hill, N.J. 08002.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Is it "intolerable" to let Saddam build weapons of mass destruction, but "tolerable" to put up with North Korea? If so, does using the "I" word mean we're logically committed to doing something? What if we decide to tolerate the intolerable? Does that make sense? Is that the equivalent of saying "Live and let live"? Or is tolerating the intolerable itself intolerable? Hold that headscratching! Just when we need him most, give it up - your confusion, that is - to Swarthmore College philosophy prof Hans Oberdiek, the man who wrote the book on tolerance.
NEWS
November 5, 2010
RE FATIMAH Ali's Oct. 26 column: Is it tolerance or intolerance that allows you to pray to Allah five times a day? Or that allows your opinions in a newspaper column? The fact that NPR fired Juan Williams for sharing his feelings shows us the oxymoron that is "tolerant liberal. " Mr. Williams didn't toe the leftist line, therefore he was no longer tolerated and was a bigot. I'm right there with you, Juan - I also share those feelings. If it were the "acts of a few," it wouldn't be as big a concern.
NEWS
September 10, 2007
As students leave summer vacation behind and resume their reading, writing, math and science, many school districts struggle with how to teach the harder lessons required in their curriculums these days. By state mandate or societal necessity, they have to fashion lessons on conflict resolution, sex education, tolerance, diversity and anti-bullying - all while trying to respect parents' divergent views of morality. It isn't easy. No district discovered that more painfully last school year than Evesham in Burlington County.
NEWS
December 12, 1986
I applaud Thomas J. Tull's humor in saying, "If we find the men, hold them accountable and force them to support the children they fathered, the welfare system will do a vanishing act that would be the envy of Harry Houdini" (Op- ed Page, "Where are welfare fathers?", Dec. 1). Males are usually so tolerant of one another's sexual indiscretions while holding females culpable for moral lapses and illicit births, that I could hardly believe my eyes that a male actually wrote the article.
NEWS
August 9, 1996
As if there were any doubt, the convention platform committee this week showed the Republican Party - and the nation - just who's boss. And it's not Bob Dole. Led by Bay Buchanan - at least as fearsome as her big brother Pat - religious ultra-conservatives overwhelming rejected "tolerance," the word as well as the concept, from the party's platform plank on abortion. Even more, they rubbed the moderates' out-of-joint noses in it. After threatening a floor fight, moderates like New Jersey Gov. Christie Whitman and California's Pete Wilson instead accepted a few words - in the appendix of the platform, where all the rejected amendments are dumped.
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The job of a graphic artist is to turn an abstract idea into a visual image that grabs your attention, sends a message, and sometimes changes your mind. Tolerance was the message sent by more than 300 students in a poster competition sponsored by the local chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts. The contest was the brainchild of graphic-design teachers and practitioners Frank Baseman and Mark Willie. Baseman teaches at Philadelphia University; Willie, at Drexel.
NEWS
December 9, 1997 | By Peter Nicholas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can anything good come from the ugly threats directed at an African American family living in the Northeast? A Holmesburg civic group would like to think so. The Holmesburg Community Improvement Association is hosting a meeting of politicians and residents on Monday aimed at improving race relations in the Northeast. The goal is to develop strategies for preventing racist acts and to set up a committee to bridge differences among racial groups. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the Mount Zion Baptist Church at 8101 Erdrick St. The church has been among the few neighborhood supporters of James Daggett and his family.
NEWS
March 6, 1994 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Germany will issue a commemorative Thursday promoting improved relations between immigrants and citizens following ethnic and racial skirmishes. The 100-pfennig stamp depicts people of varying ethnic backgrounds holding a banner that reads "Living together!" In recent years, Germany has been the scene of attacks - some fatal - on foreigners attempting to blend into the nation's workforce. There has been a move to ban the entrance of any more foreigners. Shortly after World War II, Germany faced a shortage of workers, and between 1955 and 1973 recruited people from Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Greece and the former Yugoslavia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 14, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
When a smug political machine sends dutiful functionaries to Harrisburg whose chief responsibilities are to back the party, vote as instructed when instructed, and collect a paycheck, it should come as no surprise when arrests occur. Democratic State Reps. Louise Bishop, Michelle Brownlee, Ronald Waters, and Vanessa Lowery Brown, all of Philadelphia, didn't have the decency to resign after The Inquirer reported in March 2014 that they had been recorded taking cash from an undercover informant in a sting conducted by the state Attorney General's Office.
SPORTS
October 27, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Since football, or more precisely football-viewing, is overwhelmingly the favorite pastime of 21st-century Americans, it's no surprise that it too has become a polarizing subject. Those who love the sport subscribe to a heroic narrative: It's a colorful, compelling, athletic spectacle, one whose participants embody the virtues of teamwork, strength, and dedication. Others see football as a militaristic farce. Its coaches are egomaniacal martinets. Its players are incurious lemmings.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY MARC J. DUNKELMAN
AMERICANS LIKE to believe that our exceptional story was cooked up in the proverbial melting pot. And it's true that we've broadly taken strength from our diversity. But the way we engage our differences has more recently begun to shift. We're more tolerant today than we've ever been, but we're also more likely to wall ourselves off from those who hold opposing points of view. As a result, the latitude to lead lives of our own choosing allows and sometimes compels us to narrow the horizons of our individual experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Lisa D'Amour's Cherokee is receiving its world premiere at the Wilma, and under Anne Kauffman's direction, it's an impressive production: a terrific cast and an eye-popping set (designed by Mimi Lien). But this new script, D'Amour's first play after her big hit Detroit , still needs work. It is crammed with awkward exposition about the five characters' backgrounds and seems to lose its sense of humor without warning. Like Detroit , this play involves two couples, one young, one middle-aged: John (David Ingram)
NEWS
October 20, 2013 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank Meeink grew up in South Philadelphia three decades ago, but he never met a racist skinhead until he visited his cousin in Lancaster in 1989. He watched his cousin and his friends pound mercilessly on victims at a concert and saw the fear they stoked in others. A vulnerable 13-year-old with a rocky home life, Meeink was drawn into their violent world. He threw himself into the neo-Nazi scene. By 15, his head was shaved, acts of violence were second nature, and he sported a large swastika tattoo on his neck.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By David Crary, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Amid a surge of antigay violence and repression in several countries, the United Nations' human-rights office on Friday launched its first global outreach campaign to promote tolerance and greater equality for lesbians, gays, transgender people, and bisexuals. Called Free and Equal, it's an unprecedented effort by the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights to change public attitudes around the world on issues that have bitterly divided the United Nations' own member states.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
By Neil Greenberg Welcome to my idyllic corner of the world, Cheltenham Township. What a cornucopia of affable diversity. We have all the requisite ethnic and religious groups, immigrants from everywhere, and all the possible family structures: traditional marriages, divorces and remarriages, single parents, two-mommy and two-daddy households - I mean everything. And it all works out pretty well. On the rare occasions when we need the police, they're here in two minutes. Ten years ago, when my son Griffin was at Cheltenham High and my daughter Julia was in second grade at Myers Elementary, I wrote about their contrasting social experiences in an Inquirer op-ed.
NEWS
March 24, 2013 | By Pamela Engel, Associated Press
INDIANAPOLIS - Saplings from the chestnut tree that stood as a symbol of hope for Anne Frank as she hid from the Nazis for two years in Amsterdam are being distributed to 11 sites in the United States in a project that aims to preserve her legacy and promote tolerance. The tree, one of the Jewish teenager's only connections to nature while she hid with her family, was diseased and rotted through the trunk when wind and heavy rain toppled it in August 2010. But saplings grown from its seeds will be planted starting in April, when the Children's Museum of Indianapolis will put the first one in the ground.
NEWS
February 17, 2013 | By Patrick Condon, Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS - Dik Bolger is a lifelong Minnesota Democrat, a gray-bearded baby boomer with a braid down his back whose Minneapolis printing company's plant displays work by local artists and sculptors. He backed Mark Dayton for governor, but his take on the Democratic chief executive's plan for new business taxes could be the voice-over for a Republican campaign commercial. "We're screwed," Bolger said, if the tax goes through.  His 79-year-old company competes nationwide and overseas for work with major brands like Chanel.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Mary Tebeau
The Dec. 21 attack on the Chestnut Hill Friends Meeting construction site, which police have attributed to union violence, illuminates the grip of fear that the Philadelphia-area union building trades have inflicted on local development for years. Bullying is not tolerated in our children's schools and should not be tolerated in the construction industry. In Pennsylvania, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 80 percent of construction employees elect not to join a union, and all construction companies have an opportunity to compete for projects through open bidding.
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