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Toll Bridge

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NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the great bridge over Trout Run in Gladwyne nears completion, that inevitable, and somewhat delicate question has been posed: For whom should the bridge be named? A politician? A poet? Bill Owens? "Oh no, not me," said Owens, a former newspaper photographer turned Main Line developer. Owens is paying $150,000 to build a 70-foot bridge over a foot-deep creek. The bridge will service a single house. He insists that credit go where it is due: "Name it after my checkbook.
NEWS
June 19, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Federal highway officials have given the green light for final design and construction of a toll bridge to replace the free Scudder Falls Bridge on I-95 between Bucks and Mercer Counties. The Federal Highway Administration determined the proposed $328 million, nine-lane, 180-foot-wide toll bridge would have "no significant impact" on the human environment around the bridge. That finding clears the way for the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission to proceed with final design, which could take 18 months to complete.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | by Michael Hinkelman, Daily News Staff Writer
On any given day, about 10,000 vehicles line up each morning during rush hour waiting to cross the Ben Franklin Bridge. It's a costly ritual that increases congestion and air pollution, lengthens travel time, wastes fuel and causes lost productivity. As it prepares to vote next week on a proposed 50 percent boost in bridge tolls, the Delaware River Port Authority has the power to reduce congestion by pricing tolls in a way that encourages customers to carpool, use mass-transit alternatives like PATCO, or drive at off-peak times.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Talk about your technological advances. First there were tokens, so drivers crossing toll bridges didn't have to mess around with money. Then came exact-change baskets, so folks could toss in their tokens or coins and keep on rolling. Now, there are nifty new gizmos that read sensors on cars so people don't even have to slow down as they whiz across a bridge. You will find none of these on the toll bridge at Dingmans Ferry. Tokens? Try red construction-paper tickets, like those sold at school carnivals.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | By Lewis Kamb, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A stretch of new asphalt along the northbound lanes of the Route 1 toll bridge looks clean and sharp with its fresh black expanses and bright white striping. But whether it effectively reduces traffic noise that residents have complained about for years depends a lot on whom you talk to. "I've noticed the difference," said Joseph F. Catania, director of the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, which maintains the bridge. "I'm not satisfied with it at all," countered lifelong borough resident Michael Meyers, whose house is located directly below the toll-bridge plaza on residential Moreau Street.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2002 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The State of Delaware and the Norfolk Southern Corp. have agreed to create what they think is the nation's first toll bridge for railroads. The tolls will be used to repair the bridge, strengthening the nearby Port of Wilmington and other rail users as well as allowing the state to run passenger trains over Norfolk Southern tracks between Wilmington and Dover, possibly within six years. The improved freight-rail and future passenger service will ease congestion on U.S. Route 1 and other highways, Nathan Hayward 3d, Delaware's secretary of transportation, said.
NEWS
July 7, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission will begin a noise study around the Route 1 toll bridge, responding to residents' complaints that nearby truck noise remains unbearable. The two-month study should begin in the next 10 days, said Joseph Catania, executive director for the commission. Resident concerns about noise and dust were bolstered by figures indicating that more traffic has been moving over Route 1 because of construction on the Lower Trenton Bridge. A traffic study in May showed more than 54,000 vehicles a day traveled over the Route 1 toll bridge - an increase of about 8,400.
NEWS
June 26, 1986 | By Lacy McCrary, Inquirer Staff Writer
The venerable Calhoun Street Bridge, which has served travelers crossing the Delaware River between the Trenton area and Bucks County for 102 years, has been closed indefinitely after being damaged, perhaps beyond repair, early Tuesday. A Morrisville police spokesman said a Trenton man, driving a stolen car, was being pursued by Falls Township police when he lost control of the vehicle and it slammed into the side of the bridge. Thomas E. Henry, comptroller of the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, the authority that operates the bridge, said the structure sustained extensive damage to a major support truss that holds it together.
NEWS
February 24, 2000 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pedestrian walkways on the Benjamin Franklin Bridge have been closed until the end of June because of three work projects on the 74-year-old span. The Delaware River Port Authority said the work would have only a "minimal impact" on vehicle traffic on the toll bridge. Joseph Diemer, a spokesman for the bistate agency, said the DRPA had hoped to keep a walkway open during the work but decided it was impossible with all three projects under way at once. The bridge has two pedestrian walkways, but only one is open at any one time and only during daylight hours.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before beginning a $2.5 billion project to widen the New Jersey Turnpike, turnpike officials said the construction was necessary to reduce existing congestion and to cope with future traffic. "Turnpike traffic is on the rise," the state Turnpike Authority said in its justification for the project. "By 2032 northbound traffic volume is expected to increase by nearly 68 percent [above 2005 levels]; southbound traffic is forecasted to increase by 92 percent. " Now, one-third of the way through that 27-year forecast, turnpike traffic is actually about 10 percent lower than it was in 2005.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
The Delaware River Port Authority has seen many changes in recent years, including the replacement of much of its board, a raft of new rules meant to keep it honest, and the phasing out of spending on pork projects far afield of its transportation mission. What hasn't changed is the agency's fundamental and reflexive hostility to reform. The latest findings of the DRPA inspector general's office, a much-needed internal watchdog function instituted last year, show that the bistate bridge and rail agency retains the old habits that have helped squander toll-payers' money for years.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal highway officials have given the green light for final design and construction of a toll bridge to replace the free Scudder Falls Bridge on I-95 between Bucks and Mercer Counties. The Federal Highway Administration determined the proposed $328 million, nine-lane, 180-foot-wide toll bridge would have "no significant impact" on the human environment around the bridge. That finding clears the way for the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission to proceed with final design, which could take 18 months to complete.
NEWS
March 29, 2011
Employees of the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, which operates seven toll bridges between Trenton and the New York state line, will lose their free E-ZPass benefit May 2. The bridge commission approved eliminating the free rides Monday, responding to a request from Gov. Christie. Christie has targeted free rides for employees at a number of agencies, including the New Jersey Turnpike and the Delaware River Port Authority. He was rebuffed in his effort to eliminate the benefit for union employees at the DRPA when an arbitrator ruled in January that the workers were entitled to the free rides under terms of their labor contracts.
NEWS
August 16, 2008 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Delaware River Port Authority committee yesterday gave preliminary approval to a plan hiking bridge tolls from $3 to $4 and increasing PATCO fares by 10 percent despite intense public opposition, agreeing only to abandon restrictions on senior citizen discounts. The plan, approved without dissent by the authority's finance committee, goes to the full DRPA board on Wednesday, where the hikes are expected to receive final approval. If approved, Delaware River bridge tolls for cars would increase from $3 to $4 on Sept.
NEWS
December 13, 2007 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starting a process that will likely end in substantial toll increases on four local bridges, the Delaware River Port Authority board yesterday approved its 2008 operating and capital budgets. The cost of bridge repairs and maintenance and of rebuilding PATCO commuter railcars will require borrowing money soon, DRPA officials said. And that's likely to mean toll increases by mid-2008 on the Ben Franklin, Walt Whitman, Betsy Ross and Commodore Barry Bridges. Tolls, now $3 for autos, could rise by as much as $2. An alternative would be for the port authority to increase tolls by less than $2 and implement annual hikes tied to inflation.
NEWS
June 15, 2004 | By Dave Turner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State troopers from Pennsylvania and New Jersey began regular patrols yesterday of five major bridges owned by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission. The patrols are part of an agreement between the commission and the two police agencies that Gov. Rendell and Gov. McGreevey suggested. They proposed using troopers when they asked the commission in September to partially roll back a toll increase imposed in 2002. Tolls were reduced a month later. The commission had planned to form its own police force with 36 employees in an effort to increase security after the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
NEWS
May 4, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A privately owned seashore bridge will likely close because New Jersey's Department of Transportation yesterday refused a request for money from its owners. The owners of the Beesleys Point Bridge, which carries Route 9 over Great Egg Harbor Bay, warned this spring that it would have to close if the state did not kick in $2 million for repairs. In a letter yesterday to Stephen Hankin, a principal in the Beesleys Point Bridge Corp., Transportation Commissioner Jack Lettiere noted that the state had paid $900,000 for repairs to the bridge in 1997.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Toll-beaters, your days may be numbered. By March, should you try to slip through the E-ZPass lanes of the Commodore Barry Bridge without a valid transponder, those gates aren't going to open. It's part of a pilot program approved yesterday by the cash-strapped Delaware River Port Authority that, if permanently implemented on its four bridges, could net $2 million in annual revenue. Gates in the authority's E-ZPass lanes now open for all motorists. If an account is not credited, an alert sign flashes, the vehicle's license plate is photographed, and a violation notice is mailed.
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