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Tomato Soup

ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1999 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
You might have a hunger for the delicate pan-fried boneless rainbow trout they serve at Arroyo Grille, in Manayunk. But when, even in the parking lot, soft, fruity and smoky aromas tease the senses, it's tough not to think barbecue. Platefuls of slowly smoked barbecue. Dry-rubbed and tender meats brushed with the sweet-and-sour flavors of molasses and vinegar. Mustard and tomato. At Arroyo, the choices are many: Moist chicken hiding under a crisp mahogany skin ($11.50); pulled pork in sauce ($12.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
The walls at Rouge 99 are covered with the palest of floor-to-ceiling blush-colored drapes. The banquette couches are plush enough to nap on. The tables are dark, rich-looking wood. The lighting is subdued and romantic. Even though the place is frequently packed, you feel as if you're dining in a private salon. Only it ain't nothin' like this at your place. In most American homes, the dining room has the same old boring setup that all the houses in the neighborhood have - matching table, chairs and china closet, and the chandelier that was there when you moved in. Wouldn't it be neat if, instead of cookie-cutter sameness, your dining room exuded the kind of ambience you find in upscale restaurants?
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
The sting doesn't pierce as it once did. Decades of rote rejection tend to stifle illusion. The heart no longer leaps with wild surmise when the telephone peals in mid-June. Yep, they announced another batch of MacArthur Fellows, a.k.a. "genius grants," this week. Get a call? Nope, me neither. Once again this high-brow equivalent of Ed McMahon ringing your doorbell with a humongous cardboard check tucked under his armpit has passed me by. Not for me a grant of $235,000 TO $375,000, with no strings attached.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1998 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What would Andy Warhol say? After all, the Sixties pop artist helped elevate one of America's most enduring commercial images, the famous Campbell Soup Co. red-and-white soup can, to a cultural icon. Yesterday, the Camden company showed how it has noodled with its classic design as it unveiled three Warhol-sized soup cans, familiar-looking except for the addition of a photograph of a figure skater on each. "We don't do this lightly," said Campbell spokesman Kevin Lowery.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | by Aliza Green, For the Daily News
Yo, Chefs! First, thank you for printing the Art Museum's recipe for garlic mashed potatoes (Jan. 15). They're great. I never follow a recipe, but this time I did and amazed my wife with the results. Second, my real quest: As a Navy ship's cook back in 1945, I was one member of a "watch crew" that fed 5,000 sailors in eight lines. We were specialized, so I don't know how the recipes came together. But I do know that when cream of tomato soup was on the menu, the usual soup quantity had to be more than doubled because so many people came back for seconds and thirds.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The bad news is you won't lose those winter pounds if you indulge in one of Widener University's theme dinners between now and April. The good news is your wallet won't get much skinnier, either. Organized and prepared by students in the university's Hotel and Restaurant Management School, the meals provide diners with a full-service culinary experience for an average cost of $14. "From appetizer to coffee," is how foods' instructor and restaurant manager Joy Dickerson described the meal guests can expect on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at the Heintz Dining Room on the university's main campus.
FOOD
December 14, 1994 | by Maria Gallagher, Daily News Food Editor
The first time I heard of the Atlanta-based Pleasant Peasant restaurants, I pictured a congenial waitstaff outfitted in Birkenstocks and homespun. Not true, as it turned out. The Pleasant Peasant that opened last month in the former H. A. Winston's at 15th and Locust streets is very '90s, from the hip haircuts on the service-oriented waitstaff to the shiny black granite countertops that frame the bar and the open kitchen. The name refers to the restaurant's plate-filling portions of fresh, uncomplicated, full-flavored food in a style I'd describe as American Trattoria.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
COMMAND PERFORMANCE MAY BRING DOWN THE HOUSE Officials in Portland, Maine, say they're up a tree. They really didn't want to order a 7-year-old to tear down his treehouse over the Christmas holiday, but they were forced to because it was put up without a building permit. Benjamin Kolko and his parents were given until Jan. 4 to demolish the treehouse or go to court after a neighbor complained that the structure, which has a roof, windows and cedar-shingle sides, was an eysore.
FOOD
August 23, 1992 | By Betty Rosbottom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Recently I was in a hair salon under the dryer when a friend spotted me and came over to discuss the menu for a future dinner party. Fresh tomato soup with grilled scallops, a dish I had served at a casual supper a few days before, came to mind. I also recommended a pesto tart and a salad of mixed greens in a white wine dressing. She liked these ideas and thought they would work well with a favorite dessert, chocolate brownies mounded with coffee ice cream and drizzled with warm fudge sauce.
FOOD
October 23, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Our refuse company wishes us to remove labels and wash our cans before recycling. Removing the label is no problem, but rinsing every can by hand is too wasteful of water. That's why I put the can, with lid attached, in my dishwasher with all the other dirty dishes. And I use my fabric softener sheets more than once. Usually, they work through three drying cycles. - Linda Dear Polly: Keep a few absorbent towels or rags in your garage. After driving your car home in the rain, towel it off. The result: a rain- washed car!
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