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Tony Perez

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SPORTS
August 29, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Tony Perez was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds' Hall of Fame before last night's game against the visiting Florida Marlins. Perez and Cy Seymour, an outfielder for the Reds from 1902 to 1906, were the first inducted into the team's hall in 10 years. Perez, now a special assistant in Florida's front office, received a replica of his plaque during on-field ceremonies. Perez was a vital part of the Big Red Machine and managed the Reds for 44 games in 1993. Managing executive John Allen resurrected the team's Hall of Fame, which was ignored after Marge Schott took over the team in the 1980s.
SPORTS
May 25, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Cincinnati Reds fired Tony Perez yesterday, only 44 games into his first season as manager, and replaced him with former New York Mets manager Davey Johnson. The stunning firing came less than seven months after Perez, affectionately known as "Doggie" in Cincinnati, agreed to a one-year contract that left little margin for error. General manager Jim Bowden awoke Perez and told him by telephone that he was fired. "Forty-four games into the season, I don't think it's fair," Perez said.
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
For the first time since his major- league call-up, Pete Rose Jr. got to play third base with boyhood friend Eduardo Perez at first base yesterday. Rose Jr., the son of baseball's all-time hits leader, pinch-hit in the fourth inning of a 13-4 loss to Pittsburgh and stayed in the game at third base for four innings. Perez, the son of former Reds first baseman and manager Tony Perez, was already at first. It was the first time that a Rose and a Perez were on the field defensively for Cincinnati since the fourth and final game of the 1976 World Series win over the New York Yankees.
SPORTS
May 1, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
The Angels' Torii Hunter, who has the fewest errors of any outfielder in history with more than 4,500 chances, lost a fly ball in a brutal sun field in Cleveland on Sunday and allowed two runs to score. The error was only Hunter's 36th in 4,525 chances.   Around the bigs The Yankees left 15 men on base on Sunday but still beat the Tigers, 6-2. The major- league record for men left on in a nine-inning game is 20, set by a team rarely associated with futility - the 1956 Yankees of Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle.
SPORTS
October 31, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
Marge Schott has what she wants: a manager who knows the Cincinnati Reds and will tolerate her dog. And it doesn't hurt that the manager's nickname is Doggie. Batting instructor Tony Perez, a member of Cincinnati's "Big Red Machine" in the 1970s, has never managed. But the Reds' most reliable clutch hitter of those great teams was given a one-year contract yesterday, underscoring the team's hesitance to make a long-term commitment. Former manager Lou Piniella, who resigned earlier this month, got a three-year contract in 1990.
SPORTS
October 8, 1986 | From Inquirer wire services
Tony Perez, who just retired from the Cincinnati Reds, announced yesterday that he would return next year as a coach with the National League team. The Reds offered Perez, 44, a choice of jobs within the organization after his retirement Sunday. He said he thought about scouting for the club in Latin America but decided he wanted to remain on the major-league squad. "I think the best I can do for the Cincinnati ball club is be a coach for the guys," said the longtime first baseman.
SPORTS
March 22, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was little showboating this time for Roy Jones Jr., the light heavyweight who thinks of himself as the best pound-for-pound fighter alive. Little playing to the crowd and almost none of his usual comic facial expressions and shimmy shakes. This time, there was dismay. This time, there was a swollen lump under his left eye. This time, there was defeat. In another of boxing's too-frequent bizarre endings, an apparent ninth-round knockout by Jones became a disqualification, and the World Boxing Council light-heavyweight title went to little-known Montell Griffin of Chicago, who was being revived while referee Tony Perez was making his decision last night.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Los Angeles Dodgers reached an agreement with Davey Johnson last night, and will introduce him as their manager during a news conference today at Dodger Stadium. Johnson accepted the offer after completing negotiations with president Bob Graziano and general manager Kevin Malone. In succeeding Glenn Hoffman, Johnson becomes only the Dodgers' fifth manager since the franchise moved to Los Angeles in 1958 - but their third in four months. The Los Angeles Times reported that Johnson will receive a multiyear package worth about $1 million annually, making the former Phillies second baseman one of the game's highest-paid field leaders.
SPORTS
February 24, 2000 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
OK, so the Super Bowl has been over for a few weeks, and you are ready to start thinking about baseball. But before you do, why not take one more run through your commons box and see if you can locate a Kurt Warner rookie card? You see, according to Beckett.com, the "authority" on card pricing, Warner's rookie card has increased in value a whopping 14,000 percent. (That's not a typo.) Warner's first card was issued in 1999 by Pacific (it was No. 343), and it has been actively trading of late in the $35-to-$40 range.
SPORTS
October 31, 1992 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Tony Perez, a key player on Cincinnati's Big Red Machine teams of the mid- 1970s, was named Reds manager and given a one-year contract yesterday. The Cuban native, mostly a first baseman, starred on the teams that won World Series titles in 1975-76. He was the first of seven candidates to be interviewed. Don Gullett was named bullpen coach, Ron Oester became first-base coach and Dave Miley was hired as bench coach. Perez said he would lean on others for advice. Asked whether he'll be a disciplinarian, he said, "We're going to work on that together.
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REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 2013 | By Sally Downey, For The Inquirer
Sixteen years ago, Louise Fischer and Tony Perez purchased a stone Tudor in Roxborough. With the sale came a bin of blueprints and three bound volumes chronicling the 1920 construction of the house. The archival material confirmed that beneath shag carpets and lime-green paint was a home with elegant bones. In 1997, Fischer was living in a new townhouse in Andorra and shopping for a place with character she could share with Perez, who loved old homes. Her daughter, Lisa Santoro, had found a prospect on Green Lane.
SPORTS
May 1, 2012 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
The Angels' Torii Hunter, who has the fewest errors of any outfielder in history with more than 4,500 chances, lost a fly ball in a brutal sun field in Cleveland on Sunday and allowed two runs to score. The error was only Hunter's 36th in 4,525 chances.   Around the bigs The Yankees left 15 men on base on Sunday but still beat the Tigers, 6-2. The major- league record for men left on in a nine-inning game is 20, set by a team rarely associated with futility - the 1956 Yankees of Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle.
SPORTS
February 24, 2000 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
OK, so the Super Bowl has been over for a few weeks, and you are ready to start thinking about baseball. But before you do, why not take one more run through your commons box and see if you can locate a Kurt Warner rookie card? You see, according to Beckett.com, the "authority" on card pricing, Warner's rookie card has increased in value a whopping 14,000 percent. (That's not a typo.) Warner's first card was issued in 1999 by Pacific (it was No. 343), and it has been actively trading of late in the $35-to-$40 range.
SPORTS
January 12, 2000 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Paul Owens vividly recalls the first time he saw Tony Perez play. It was late in the 1964 season. The Pope was scouting a minor league game between Little Rock and host San Diego, then the Reds' top farm team, at Westgate Park. "A beautiful Sunday afternoon," Owens said last night after hearing that Perez, along with former Red Sox and Whte Sox catcher Carlton Fisk had been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. "He hit two home runs. Off tough pitchers, too. " Owens doesn't claim he predicted that day that Perez would someday become a Hall of Famer.
SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Los Angeles Dodgers reached an agreement with Davey Johnson last night, and will introduce him as their manager during a news conference today at Dodger Stadium. Johnson accepted the offer after completing negotiations with president Bob Graziano and general manager Kevin Malone. In succeeding Glenn Hoffman, Johnson becomes only the Dodgers' fifth manager since the franchise moved to Los Angeles in 1958 - but their third in four months. The Los Angeles Times reported that Johnson will receive a multiyear package worth about $1 million annually, making the former Phillies second baseman one of the game's highest-paid field leaders.
SPORTS
August 29, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Tony Perez was inducted into the Cincinnati Reds' Hall of Fame before last night's game against the visiting Florida Marlins. Perez and Cy Seymour, an outfielder for the Reds from 1902 to 1906, were the first inducted into the team's hall in 10 years. Perez, now a special assistant in Florida's front office, received a replica of his plaque during on-field ceremonies. Perez was a vital part of the Big Red Machine and managed the Reds for 44 games in 1993. Managing executive John Allen resurrected the team's Hall of Fame, which was ignored after Marge Schott took over the team in the 1980s.
SPORTS
January 6, 1998 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It took Don Sutton 23 years to win 324 games in the major leagues. It only seemed as if it took him longer to get elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Yesterday - 10 years after his last win, five years after he first appeared on the ballot - Sutton finally made it. He'd missed election by just nine votes last year, but this time, it wasn't even close. Sutton's 386 votes represented 81.6 percent of the ballots cast by members of the Baseball Writers Association of America, 31 more votes than the 75 percent needed for election.
SPORTS
September 7, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
For the first time since his major- league call-up, Pete Rose Jr. got to play third base with boyhood friend Eduardo Perez at first base yesterday. Rose Jr., the son of baseball's all-time hits leader, pinch-hit in the fourth inning of a 13-4 loss to Pittsburgh and stayed in the game at third base for four innings. Perez, the son of former Reds first baseman and manager Tony Perez, was already at first. It was the first time that a Rose and a Perez were on the field defensively for Cincinnati since the fourth and final game of the 1976 World Series win over the New York Yankees.
SPORTS
March 22, 1997 | By Jay Searcy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was little showboating this time for Roy Jones Jr., the light heavyweight who thinks of himself as the best pound-for-pound fighter alive. Little playing to the crowd and almost none of his usual comic facial expressions and shimmy shakes. This time, there was dismay. This time, there was a swollen lump under his left eye. This time, there was defeat. In another of boxing's too-frequent bizarre endings, an apparent ninth-round knockout by Jones became a disqualification, and the World Boxing Council light-heavyweight title went to little-known Montell Griffin of Chicago, who was being revived while referee Tony Perez was making his decision last night.
SPORTS
July 8, 1996 | By Terry Bitman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As usual, Mark Fidrych talked to the ball. On this night, the Cincinnati bats answered. Fidrych, the wacky rookie pitcher for the Detroit Tigers known as The Bird, liked to lecture the baseball before delivering a pitch. The ball didn't listen very well when Fidrych started for the American League in the only other All-Star Game played at Veterans Stadium - July 13, 1976. The National League, led by the heavy artillery of the Big Red Machine, with support from some young whippersnappers from the host team, jumped on the quirky righthander for two first-inning runs and routed the AL, 7-1. It was the NL's fifth straight victory and its 13th in 14 years.
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