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Tool

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BUSINESS
April 11, 1990 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
The Philadelphia Advanced Productivity Exposition opened yesterday at the Civic Center. Exhibits demonstrate a wide range of machine tools, computer- driven manufacturing systems and other advanced metal-working technologies. Admission is $10.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
I experience a pronounced contrast to commentary writer Christopher Paslay in my work with students utilizing computers to learn writing skills ("Computers distract from craft of writing," June 8). Teaching students ranging from learning-disabled to gifted, I see the drawbacks he pointed out as advantages that launch talented writers. I witness the computer becoming a literary bridge, linking a struggling student to the world of writing. Pencil writing and loose papers that hide inside the deep recesses of a desk can be cumbersome and overwhelming barriers to expression of thought.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
With its obsessive lyrics and stammering complexity, , Tool has an air of brainy rarity - the Salinger of nu-metal, King Crimson for Hot Topic shoppers. Primal screamer Maynard James Keenan has the elan of a gloomy professor with cool belt buckles to go with his takes on trauma, drugs and conspiracies. The inordinate number of bald guys who sold out the Tower Wednesday for the tiny-venue preview to Tool's summer shed tour ate that up. Keenan, "finding beauty in the dissonance" through the schizy chasm of "Schism," powerfully crooned through that broken-heeled waltz while looking like Travis Bickle en route to Fire Island: bare chest, aviator glasses and Mohawk.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The psychedelic experience is often dismissed due to the dippy eclat of '60s social leaders such as Timothy Leary. But for Tool, as witnessed Tuesday at the nearly full First Union Spectrum, psychedelia is no joke. The quartet employed hallucinatory images, trance-y tunes, and anti-authoritarian words to devastating effect. As with the packaging of its 2001 disc, Lateralus, Tool exposed layers of the body - musculature, blood vessels, nerve endings - visually and lyrically.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
John Gellert had health insurance for the first time last year. The self-employed Juniata resident qualified for a tax credit subsidy on the Affordable Care Act marketplace and bought Independence Blue Cross' silver tier Keystone HMO Proactive plan. He liked the plan and was ready to renew last month when he was told that he no longer qualified for a marketplace subsidy because his income was below the $16,105 federal poverty level. The marketplace representative "asked a series of questions and that's when I knew that I didn't qualify," said Gellert, 57. "That's when I said I need to look to see what I qualify for. " The deadline to have insurance for Feb. 1 is Thursday.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Stanley R. Bongard, a tool and die maker, died Tuesday. He was 63 and lived in Langhorne. Born in Manayunk, Bongard was a graduate of Roxborough High School, a Navy veteran of World War II, and a volunteer fireman with the Nottingham Fire Company. He had made his living in the tool and die trade for the last 40 years. At the time of his death, he was a 20-year employee with the Milton-Roy Co. Bongard was an active member of Harry T. Klunn Post 9220, Veterans of Foreign Wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
After serving as a kind of master of ceremonies at some Lollapalooza dates last year, Timothy Leary described his twentysomething audience as "one of the most tough-minded, cynical generations I've encountered. " Lollapalooza signaled a change in consciousness for Generation X, he observed - he just wasn't sure what that change was. Perhaps Leary missed the redemption-through-catharsis message of Tool, which played the Trocadero on Monday in its first Philadelphia appearance since Lollapalooza.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By Chris Panzetta, Special to The Inquirer
Whether a tool shed in a Wayne resident's side yard should remain standing or be torn down was debated at a meeting last week of the Upper Merion Zoning Hearing board. Larry Jones, of 390 General Washington Rd. in Wayne, sought an exception to a township zoning ordinance requiring a 50-foot setback for the tool shed, which is about 30 feet from the sideyard property line. Jones brought two neighbors to testify for him at Thursday's meeting, and one nearby resident testified in favor of tearing down the shed, which has been in place for "five to six years," according to Jones.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Liana B. Baker, MARKET WATCH
CHICAGO - For many homeowners, electricity use is highest during the summer - that means steeper energy bills are just around the corner. But a lot of the energy you're paying for is squandered through air leaks around doors and windows, or through cable boxes and appliances that sap energy when no one is around. Before you shell out the cash for a professional home-energy audit, however, here are some do-it-yourself ways to measure - and then curb - your energy use.  Measure it: The average household will spend about $2,140 on residential energy consumption in 2010, according to the Washington-based Alliance to Save Energy.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The many fine Holocaust documentaries released in only the last year or so reflect the power of film to articulate the unspeakable evils of history. Documentaries have other uses, of course, and one of them is to make people look stupid by bringing their particular delusions before a mercilessly dispassionate camera. Couple the camera's unblinking gaze with the right music and editing, and a halfway skilled documentarian can do a contextual tap dance that will destroy an unwary interviewee.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 27, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Staff Writer
What's hot in high-tech political tools, designed to get disaffected citizens off their duffs? A Kickstarter-like project for viable independent candidates. Crowd-sourced dossiers on politicians, detailing their true actions and agendas on important issues. Open-source software that crunches and charts public records, making governmental agencies accountable. Electronic alerts and pre-stamped mail-in ballots that jog would-be voters when election day approaches and explain all the issues, eliminating the "gee, that name sounds good" guesswork that often takes over in the polling booth.
TRAVEL
July 18, 2016
Name: History Here. What it does: Provides nuggets of history about thousands of locations across the United States, including famous homes, battlefields, museums, and more. It can be used to prepare for a trip or to discover what's around you on a current trip. You can keep your own to-see list in "My Places. " Available: In the App Store, requires iOS 7.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch. In Google Play, requires 4.0 and up. Cost: Free.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, Staff Writer
The recent Regional Rail delays have turned riders' commutes into a guessing game of "when will my train come?" But these online and mobile tools can help take the uncertainty out of your travel plans and show you new ways to get to your destination. Transit apps. Transit Tracker, Transit App, Citymapper, and the SEPTA app all provide similar information on train and bus arrival times based on GPS data, where available. This means that the apps will tell you where your train or bus is, but typically with a three-minute delay.
TRAVEL
June 20, 2016
If there's a hard-to-reach place - the sliver of space between the car seat and center console, under the hotel mini fridge, behind the dresser - I will inadvertently send a key, credit card, coins, my cellphone, or some other important item into that void. Retrieval can be a painful and futile reach for fingers too fat, short, or klutzy to do the job. Hello ODii, my new ace weapon for tight-space recovery maneuvers. The slim, 13-inch-long plastic cylinder houses a flexible metal rod that telescopes out an additional 7 inches, with a four-pronged claw at the tip. Squeeze a spring-loaded mechanism in the handle, and the claw grabs tightly onto your prey, contracting to just a quarter of an inch for withdrawal.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
When Kelly Hidleburg's confounding case of anemia was traced to heavy bleeding due to uterine fibroids, she faced the same tough choice that confronts thousands of American women every year. She could have her uterus or just the fibroids surgically removed, or she could try one of several newer procedures aimed at shrinking the usually benign but troublesome tumors. At 46, she could try waiting a few years to see whether menopause, with its natural decline in hormones, would solve the problem.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Are pesky deer chomping your plants? Dandelion weeds making you daffy? On a recent tour of the Philadelphia Flower Show with my old pal "McGrath" - that's Mike to you, the strictly organic host of WHYY radio's You Bet Your Garden - we got to chatting about useful gardening gizmos that the horticultural hero swears by (but never at). "They're miracle workers!" McGrath bellowed (loud and enthusiastic being central to his charm). "These things can save your garden, but don't harm the wildlife or the environment.
SPORTS
April 25, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
Iowa State may not be an NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision powerhouse, but the Cyclones do play in one of the BCS conferences and do have recruiting advantages even over an elite Football Championship Subdivision program such as North Dakota State. Carson Wentz's first collegiate start came at Iowa State in front of 55,000 fans - a number significantly greater than the 19,000 that regularly fill the Fargodome to watch the Bison. It wasn't quite like Hickory High School walking into an Indianapolis arena for the state championship in Hoosiers - "I think you'll find the measurements the same as our gym back in Hickory" - but it had to be daunting for the quarterback.
NEWS
March 25, 2016
By Shoshana Feiner I am bombarded by the prescription drug abuse epidemic. As a parent, I've attended programs at our local high school. As a citizen, I read about it in our local papers. As a daughter of elderly parents, I've watched them be casually handed prescriptions for Percocet every time they complain of arthritis pain. And as a primary-care physician, I've interacted with many drug-seeking patients. Some have come and gone quickly when they didn't get what they wanted; others faced their addiction with honesty, professional help, and a lot of hard work.
TRAVEL
March 20, 2016
The Kelvin Super Tool is classified as a multi-tool, but it's more like a whole toolbox that just begs to be taken along on car trips, cycling and boating excursions, or anywhere, just in case. Don't picture a Swiss Army knife. Picture instead a carbon steel hammer, a multi-position screwdriver with 15 interchangeable drive heads, a six-foot retractable metal tape measure, an LED flashlight, a liquid level, and a powerful alloy magnet to keep loose screws at hand - all compactly integrated into a 51/4-by-2-inch-by-1-inch-thick "mother" base.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
'This is a raisin seeder," says Don Wallace, a.k.a. the Tool Man. "The seeds in raisins used to be bigger than they are now, and this" - a hand-cranked kitchen press made of cast iron - "would squeeze them out for you. " Who knew? The Tool Man did, and still does. He donated his 3,000-piece collection of antique implements to the Historical Society of Haddonfield. And he's giving me a personal tour. "Don Wallace took the basement of Greenfield Hall, our headquarters, and turned it into a very magical place," society president Carol Smith says.
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