FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 11, 1990 | ANDREA MIHALIK/ DAILY NEWS
The Philadelphia Advanced Productivity Exposition opened yesterday at the Civic Center. Exhibits demonstrate a wide range of machine tools, computer- driven manufacturing systems and other advanced metal-working technologies. Admission is $10.
NEWS
June 15, 2006
I experience a pronounced contrast to commentary writer Christopher Paslay in my work with students utilizing computers to learn writing skills ("Computers distract from craft of writing," June 8). Teaching students ranging from learning-disabled to gifted, I see the drawbacks he pointed out as advantages that launch talented writers. I witness the computer becoming a literary bridge, linking a struggling student to the world of writing. Pencil writing and loose papers that hide inside the deep recesses of a desk can be cumbersome and overwhelming barriers to expression of thought.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
With its obsessive lyrics and stammering complexity, , Tool has an air of brainy rarity - the Salinger of nu-metal, King Crimson for Hot Topic shoppers. Primal screamer Maynard James Keenan has the elan of a gloomy professor with cool belt buckles to go with his takes on trauma, drugs and conspiracies. The inordinate number of bald guys who sold out the Tower Wednesday for the tiny-venue preview to Tool's summer shed tour ate that up. Keenan, "finding beauty in the dissonance" through the schizy chasm of "Schism," powerfully crooned through that broken-heeled waltz while looking like Travis Bickle en route to Fire Island: bare chest, aviator glasses and Mohawk.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The psychedelic experience is often dismissed due to the dippy eclat of '60s social leaders such as Timothy Leary. But for Tool, as witnessed Tuesday at the nearly full First Union Spectrum, psychedelia is no joke. The quartet employed hallucinatory images, trance-y tunes, and anti-authoritarian words to devastating effect. As with the packaging of its 2001 disc, Lateralus, Tool exposed layers of the body - musculature, blood vessels, nerve endings - visually and lyrically.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
John Gellert had health insurance for the first time last year. The self-employed Juniata resident qualified for a tax credit subsidy on the Affordable Care Act marketplace and bought Independence Blue Cross' silver tier Keystone HMO Proactive plan. He liked the plan and was ready to renew last month when he was told that he no longer qualified for a marketplace subsidy because his income was below the $16,105 federal poverty level. The marketplace representative "asked a series of questions and that's when I knew that I didn't qualify," said Gellert, 57. "That's when I said I need to look to see what I qualify for. " The deadline to have insurance for Feb. 1 is Thursday.
NEWS
July 28, 1989 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Stanley R. Bongard, a tool and die maker, died Tuesday. He was 63 and lived in Langhorne. Born in Manayunk, Bongard was a graduate of Roxborough High School, a Navy veteran of World War II, and a volunteer fireman with the Nottingham Fire Company. He had made his living in the tool and die trade for the last 40 years. At the time of his death, he was a 20-year employee with the Milton-Roy Co. Bongard was an active member of Harry T. Klunn Post 9220, Veterans of Foreign Wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1994 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
After serving as a kind of master of ceremonies at some Lollapalooza dates last year, Timothy Leary described his twentysomething audience as "one of the most tough-minded, cynical generations I've encountered. " Lollapalooza signaled a change in consciousness for Generation X, he observed - he just wasn't sure what that change was. Perhaps Leary missed the redemption-through-catharsis message of Tool, which played the Trocadero on Monday in its first Philadelphia appearance since Lollapalooza.
NEWS
November 12, 1987 | By Chris Panzetta, Special to The Inquirer
Whether a tool shed in a Wayne resident's side yard should remain standing or be torn down was debated at a meeting last week of the Upper Merion Zoning Hearing board. Larry Jones, of 390 General Washington Rd. in Wayne, sought an exception to a township zoning ordinance requiring a 50-foot setback for the tool shed, which is about 30 feet from the sideyard property line. Jones brought two neighbors to testify for him at Thursday's meeting, and one nearby resident testified in favor of tearing down the shed, which has been in place for "five to six years," according to Jones.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Liana B. Baker, MARKET WATCH
CHICAGO - For many homeowners, electricity use is highest during the summer - that means steeper energy bills are just around the corner. But a lot of the energy you're paying for is squandered through air leaks around doors and windows, or through cable boxes and appliances that sap energy when no one is around. Before you shell out the cash for a professional home-energy audit, however, here are some do-it-yourself ways to measure - and then curb - your energy use.  Measure it: The average household will spend about $2,140 on residential energy consumption in 2010, according to the Washington-based Alliance to Save Energy.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
The many fine Holocaust documentaries released in only the last year or so reflect the power of film to articulate the unspeakable evils of history. Documentaries have other uses, of course, and one of them is to make people look stupid by bringing their particular delusions before a mercilessly dispassionate camera. Couple the camera's unblinking gaze with the right music and editing, and a halfway skilled documentarian can do a contextual tap dance that will destroy an unwary interviewee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2015 | By Sally McCabe, For The Inquirer
Clean up. With typical Philadelphia capriciousness, hot dry weather gives way to hot wet tropical monsoons, and our gardens respond by both thriving and taking a beating. Don't be afraid to do some manicuring: foliage from tulip and daffodil bulbs is too ugly to bear; a few more hosta leaves burn out every time it tops 90 degrees; dead azalea blossoms still cling to the bushes. You have my permission to get rid of anything you don't like the looks of. But use the proper tools: handpicking for fine work, pruners for anything up to a half-inch in diameter, loppers up to an inch, and a saw for anything bigger.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH & MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writers leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
GIVE US THE resources and we will have better outcomes. That was the message yesterday from dozens of school principals as City Council continues to debate the Philadelphia School District's request for $103 million in new funding. In a letter delivered to Council and signed by more than 75 principals throughout the district, administrators described an "ongoing crisis in our schools" due to insufficient city and state funding. "It is a crisis that affects the daily lives of children and whether or not they develop their skills and capacities," the letter reads.
NEWS
March 25, 2015
Three Philadelphia men have been charged with stealing power tools from work trucks and vans throughout the Philadelphia suburbs. Matthew Suarez, Nicholas Suarez, and Donald Hodum allegedly stole power tools from vehicles in Montgomery, Delaware and Chester Counties over the course of several months, Then they resold them. The three men are charged with a total of 197 counts of theft by unlawful taking, Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman and Whitemarsh Township Police Chief T. Michael Beaty announced Monday.
REAL_ESTATE
March 22, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Have you ever coveted your contractors' professional tools and building supplies and wished you could buy similar gear? Just such an opportunity is about to present itself. For the first time, the DelChester chapter of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) will host an open-to-the-public garage/yard sale March 29 in Chester. The trade group's contractor members from Delaware and Chester Counties will be donating overstock items, wrong orders, slightly used equipment, extra parts, tools, appliances and housewares.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles J. Devlin Jr., 90, of Stone Harbor, N.J., founder of the Camden Tool Co. and later the 3D Tool Co., both in North Camden, died Tuesday, Feb. 24, at Wesley Manor in Ocean City, N.J. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Devlin grew up in the Fairmount neighborhood and graduated in 1942 from Roman Catholic High School. During World War II, Mr. Devlin served in the Army Air Corps and flew 30 missions from England as a nose gunner on a B-24 bomber, said a son, Tony. He studied accounting at the Spring Garden Institute and in 1950 opened Camden Tool, which distributed industrial metalworking equipment, material he had sold in his first job after the war. In 1990, Mr. Devlin opened 3D Tool on the same site, and served as president of both firms until retiring in 1995.
NEWS
February 3, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden County homeowners, gardeners, and fix-it-yourself types will soon have a new money-saving resource. This summer, county officials hope to launch a tool library in Gloucester Township that can help residents work on home projects without having to buy special equipment. The program will be similar to the West Philly Tool Library, which Camden County Freeholder Michelle Gentek visited last year, along with Chris Waldron, county director of sustainability and shared services. "In the short time we were there, about 20 people came through the door," Gentek said.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
John Gellert had health insurance for the first time last year. The self-employed Juniata resident qualified for a tax credit subsidy on the Affordable Care Act marketplace and bought Independence Blue Cross' silver tier Keystone HMO Proactive plan. He liked the plan and was ready to renew last month when he was told that he no longer qualified for a marketplace subsidy because his income was below the $16,105 federal poverty level. The marketplace representative "asked a series of questions and that's when I knew that I didn't qualify," said Gellert, 57. "That's when I said I need to look to see what I qualify for. " The deadline to have insurance for Feb. 1 is Thursday.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Next month, Thomas G. Frazier will sit down with colleagues at Bryn Mawr Hospital's Comprehensive Breast Center and unseal the results of a blind study for Dune Medical's MarginProbe. The four-month, 30-patient study is the second conducted at Bryn Mawr on the new diagnostic tool designed to help breast cancer surgeons determine - within minutes - whether they have removed all the malignant tissue during a lumpectomy and reduced the need for later surgery. If the second study is positive, the device could become a key tool for breast cancer surgeons at Bryn Mawr and elsewhere.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Merck & Co. said on Sept. 4 that the Food and Drug Administration approved what Merck said was a groundbreaking cancer treatment that it hopes will cure many patients and generate billions of dollars in revenue. On the same day, Bristol-Myers Squibb said bunk to that, alleging patent infringement in a lawsuit in federal court in Delaware, where both global pharmaceutical giants are registered. Bristol-Myers, whose version of that type of cancer drug was approved in Japan in July, hoped the legal move would thwart Merck in the industry race to sell expensive cancer medicine.
NEWS
September 13, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sick of being cyber-bullied? Know a friend in trouble? In a dark place yourself, but not sure where to turn? If you are a student at Haddonfield Memorial High School, help is at your fingertips. At two assemblies Thursday, the school marked its rollout of STOPit, a smartphone and tablet application that makes it easier for students to report bullying or other concerns to trusted adults. "We feel we're giving them a safer, healthier environment," said principal Charles Klaus, who considers the potential benefits well worth the approximately $3 per student the district will pay. App developer Todd Schobel, a Cherry Hill native who lives in Hunterdon County, N.J., said STOPit grew out of his devastation over the story of Amanda Todd, a Canadian teenager who killed herself in 2012 after being cyber-bullied for years.
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