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SPORTS
February 20, 2003 | By TED TAYLOR For the Daily News
The surprise hit of the 2002 baseball-card season was Topps' retro look at the 1909-11 tobacco cards. The "Topps 206" sets included cigarette-card-sized versions of today's players and current card-sized reproductions of vintage cards. So successful was that set that Topps has issued another series in time to be counted among the 2003 entries, and has introduced a few subtle changes. One of those changes is a card that begins to reflect more of what the early '50s Bowmans looked like.
SPORTS
July 25, 2002 | By TED TAYLOR For the Daily News
Topps 2002 Heritage Football hit the streets a couple of weeks ago and it looks like a winner. Topps officials have created a set even stronger than last year's award-winning debut. The new set utilizes the classic 1957 design, includes 194 cards with a whole lot of character, plus some quirks (according to Topps public relations guy Clay Luraschi). To make things complete, there's the ever-popular stick of gum in every pack. Suggested retail is $3 for each eight-card pack. Not 'those' Wright brothers As a complete surprise to no one who values vintage baseball autographs and rare memorabilia, a cricket ball that is more than 100 years old and signed by brothers and baseball pioneers Harry and George Wright, (not aviators Wilbur and Orville)
SPORTS
January 31, 2002 | By TED TAYLOR For the Daily News
While the set doesn't release until late February, the hobby buzz and excitement already is building about Topps' latest retro offering. This time, it's Topps T-206. The New York-based card giant is paying tribute to the famous 1909-11 T206 baseball set by producing a 180-card set that has the look and feel of the early 20th-century classic. "The artwork captured me immediately," said TV sports personality Keith Olbermann, who owns one of the most comprehensive T206 collections in the hobby.
SPORTS
November 7, 2002 | By TED TAYLOR For the Daily News
Both Topps and Fleer have forgone the traditional box set of updated, traded and rookie baseball card sets this fall. Instead, they are using the more usual "sell 'em by the pack" (or box) method of distribution. That, of course, provides the usual doses of good news and bad news. The good news is that you can probably get cards of your newest hometown favorite in his latest uniform. The bad news is, well, maybe you can't. In the past, the set came complete in a box. You paid your money, you got your sets.
SPORTS
December 24, 1992 | by Steve Weiser, Special to the Daily News
Topps has tried for a while to entice collectors with its attractive gold cards. Last year, they were randomly packed, averaging only one per box. The year before, Topps began by offering its older cards. They unfortunately were almost impossible to find. This year, Topps has included one gold card in every pack and has added a black-gold card. In each case of 20 boxes, you get 22 black-gold cards. Next year, Topps will come out with two series, which means you will need 44 black- gold cards for a complete set. Let's see what a complete set will go for. It will be interesting to see the prices of a gold set. Last year, collectors could buy a factory gold set for about $500 each, but I understand Topps will not do that next year.
SPORTS
July 13, 2000 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
Upper Deck incurred the wrath of the Major League Baseball Players Association this year by including a card of Ryan Anderson, who was (horrors!) not on any 40-man roster. He might or might not have ever been on Seattle's 40-man roster, but he was in the Mariners' organization (as a minor league player) and there undoubtedly were collectors who would like a card of him. Because the union gnashed its teeth and rattled its swords, Upper Deck had to remove the Anderson card from the set - after it was printed - and did so. Why all this nonsense over a marginal pitcher?
SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
BASEBALL CARDS are awesome - and not just because of the sound they make when flapping against bicycle spokes. They have all sorts of information. The player's height, weight, batting average from 5 years ago - tons of fun stuff. But the jocularity ends when Pete Rose's name comes up. Rob Harris, a Chicago-based writer, noticed the omission of any mention of Rose on the back of Topps' cards from this year. You see, every card has a line indicating how far a player is from a career record.
SPORTS
October 4, 2001 | By TED TAYLOR For the Daily News
For years, collectors have lamented the fact that Topps had virtually exclusive rights to the rookie-card market. As part of its grandfathered deal with the Major League Players Association, only Topps was able to produce cards of newly signed rookies and draft choices. For a decade, Bowman (a Topps brand) has had a corner on the rookie market because of this deal. That no longer is the case. With the upcoming release this month of UD Rookie Exclusives, Upper Deck will debut an entire Major League Baseball licensed regular set dedicated solely to rookie cards.
SPORTS
April 12, 2001 | by Ted Taylor For the Daily News
I was thrilled when I heard that Topps' celebration of 50 years of publishing baseball cards would result in a product that featured today's players on cards designed to look like the 1952 Topps set. That set remains as one of the most classic baseball designs ever created. And after opening a box of the cards - with wrappers that look like the ones I opened as a kid in 1952, and containing gum that tastes like the pieces I chewed as a boy - I really wanted to love this 407-card set. Sadly, I can't.
SPORTS
March 29, 2001 | by Ted Taylor For the Daily News
The 50th anniversary of Topps baseball cards, a milestone in America's sports and collectibles worlds, will receive another high-profile salute this year with a special exhibit in Washington. The National Sports Gallery, adjacent to the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery and contained within the MCI Center, will honor Topps with a presentation of historic Topps material. The material is coming from sources around the country and will include vintage cards from the Golden Age of Sports Cards, advertising, packaging, uncut sheets and test products.
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SPORTS
February 14, 2013 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
BASEBALL CARDS are awesome - and not just because of the sound they make when flapping against bicycle spokes. They have all sorts of information. The player's height, weight, batting average from 5 years ago - tons of fun stuff. But the jocularity ends when Pete Rose's name comes up. Rob Harris, a Chicago-based writer, noticed the omission of any mention of Rose on the back of Topps' cards from this year. You see, every card has a line indicating how far a player is from a career record.
SPORTS
February 1, 2012 | BY TOM MAHON, mahont@phillynews.com
SKIP SCHUMAKER looks bright-eyed and bushy- tailed on his 2012 Topps baseball card. Actually, only the pant leg and cleat of the outfielder are visible. The rest of the card features the now-famous rally squirrel that ran onto the field during Game 4 of the NLDS against the Phillies at Busch Stadium last season. Topps will also print a more traditional card featuring a photo of Schumaker, who was facing Roy Oswalt in the fifth inning when the rodent darted past home plate.
SPORTS
July 14, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Prosecutors said yesterday that needles and cotton balls Roger Clemens' former trainer says he used to inject the star pitcher tested positive for Clemens' DNA and anabolic steroids - evidence the defense said was faked. Assistant U.S. attorney Steven Durham revealed the results during opening arguments in Clemens' trial in Washington on charges of lying to Congress about using performance-enhancing drugs. Clemens' attorney, Rusty Hardin, responded that he won't dispute the needles contain Clemens' DNA and steroids, but accused the trainer, Brian McNamee, of "mixing" it up. "He manufactured this stuff," Hardin told jurors.
SPORTS
March 19, 2011 | By Don Beideman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Senior Molly Topp scored on the rebound of a shot by team leading scorer Annabeth Donovan and Unionville made it stand up for a 1-0 victory over Downingtown East in the girls' Flyers Cup championship game Friday night at Ice Line in West Chester. Topp's goal came with 10 minutes, 2 seconds left in the third period. The Indians ended up outshooting East, 22-15. It marked the second straight year that the Indians beat the Cougars for the crown. The two teams split a pair of games during the regular season.
SPORTS
March 8, 2010
LOOKS AS IF TOPPS went the cheap route in putting an image of Mariners lefthander Cliff Lee on a baseball card in its 2010 Opening Day set. Instead of waiting to get a photo of Lee pitching for his new team, the company reportedly took a shot of him while he was with the Phillies and doctored it to make it look like he was wearing a Mariners uniform. Several blogs and Web sites are reporting on the digitally altered card. Apparently, whoever "transformed" Lee's duds from a Phillies to a Mariners uniform forgot to remove the HK patch that the Fightins wore last season in honor of Harry Kalas, their late, beloved broadcaster.
NEWS
January 15, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Donald D. Peck, 83, formerly of Ambler, retired president of Fleer Corp., died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday at Meadowood, a retirement community in Worcester. In 1952, Mr. Peck joined Fleer, a manufacturer of bubble gum, candy and, later, baseball cards, as personnel manager. He was promoted to vice president and became president in 1971. The company had been established in Philadelphia in the 1880s and in the 1920s became the first successful manufacturer of bubble gum. As Fleer's president, Mr. Peck oversaw a five-year legal battle with a competitor, Topps Chewing Gum. Fleer contended that Topps had an illegal monopoly on the baseball-card market because it had an exclusive contract forbidding major league players from being photographed for cards for other companies.
SPORTS
October 22, 2006 | By Don Steinberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The saddest cards Topps was about to print its annual Updates & Highlights set for its 2006 baseball cards when pitcher Cory Lidle lost his life in an airplane accident earlier this month. A card showing Lidle on the Yankees was planned as one of the update cards, which are due out early next month. So Topps redesigned the card to say "In Memoriam 1972-2006. " The only other time the company has done such a card was the 1964 Ken Hubbs. Hubbs, the 1962 National League rookie of the year for the Cubs, died in February before the 1964 season, in a crash while flying his private plane.
NEWS
April 5, 2006 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The billboard that appeared Saturday outside AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, said "Trade Barry. " It looked like one of those message ads paid for by concerned citizens, in this case by fans wanting the Giants to dump embattled slugger Barry Bonds. If it wasn't immediately apparent that the big sign was the launch of a commercial campaign - to promote collecting and trading baseball cards - that may be because few people really think about baseball cards these days.
SPORTS
December 9, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Al Leiter returned to the Florida Marlins and Woody Williams went back to the San Diego Padres as teams moved quickly to grab starting pitchers yesterday after the first free-agent deadline of the off-season passed. Leiter departed the Mets with some degree of acrimony, getting an $8 million, one-year contract from Florida. The lefthander, 10-8 with a 3.21 ERA last season, returned to the team he helped pitch to the 1997 World Series title. Williams, part of the St. Louis Cardinals' NL pennant-winning team, is guaranteed $3.5 million by the Padres as part of a deal that could be worth $14.5 million for two years.
SPORTS
November 15, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Greg Anderson, the personal trainer for slugger Barry Bonds of the San Francisco Giants, is a target of the grand jury investigating BALCO Laboratories, his lawyer told ESPN.com. Anderson originally was questioned by federal officials after a Sept. 3 raid on BALCO's Burlingame, Calif., headquarters. Two days later, his home, also in Burlingame, was searched by authorities. BALCO is at the heart of the ongoing scandal involving athletes and the recently discovered substance tetrahydrogestrinone (THG)
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