FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 8, 1995
If words could sue, "common sense" and "reform" would probably have grounds for a libel suit against the Common Sense Legal Reform Act that has passed the U.S. House. It is an offense to common sense, this bid to tilt the civil law playing field so far that millions of ordinary Americans would fall right off it. It is a "reform" only if you consider tearing down the house to fix a leaky faucet to be reform. No doubt, runaway juries sometimes return outrageous civil awards against corporations.
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By Anthony Tarricone
The health-care debate has been marred by the distortions, demagoguery, and outright lies that are typical of modern American political discourse. For example, lacking any substantive ideas of their own, reform opponents have seized on tort reform - taking away the rights of injured patients - as their solution to America's health-care problems, despite ample evidence that it's no solution at all. Let's call this tort-reform fixation what it is: a sign that many Republicans are bereft of ideas and obsessed with an issue that will do nothing to lower care costs or cover the uninsured.
NEWS
September 18, 2004
With a personal-injury lawyer as Democrat John Kerry's running mate, it figures that Republican congressional leaders would suggest spending some of their precious remaining days this session on lawyer-bashing. So this week and in coming days, both House and Senate are rehashing tort-reform issues that are neither new, nor wise. These measures merely share a common virtue in being able to define the two political parties' divergent outlook on citizens' access to the courts.
NEWS
July 17, 1998 | By Larry Atkins
Tort reform sounds like a novel way to prepare fancy European pastries. But it's a serious issue that affects all of us. Last week, Senate Democrats blocked passage of a federal product-liability bill negotiated by the White House, Sen. John D. Rockefeller 4th (D., W. Va.), and Sen. Slade Gorton (R., Wash.). The bill would have set national standards for lawsuits against companies that make harmful products and would have preempted product liability standards in all 50 states. While advocates package tort reform to sound like a progressive philosophy that benefits everyone, its effect is to limit consumer lawsuits, making manufacturers less responsive to complaints about defective goods and taking an effective remedy from individuals injured by those goods.
NEWS
February 12, 2003
IT TOOK a commie-hating Republican like Richard Nixon to open China. It may take a liberal Democrat like Ed Rendell to bring tort reform to Pennsylvania. On Monday, during testimony before a congressional subcommittee, Gov. Rendell said he is "willing to consider" setting caps on how much victims of medical malpractice can get for their pain and suffering. Those words prompted cheers from doctors and jeers from trial lawyers, a group that has backed the Democrats and Rendell in big ways.
NEWS
October 14, 2003
IN THE WAR over the high cost of medical-malpractice insurance, Pennsylvania physicians have taken to lecturing patients and leaving pro-tort reform tracts in their waiting rooms. This week, doctors are taking a more aggressive stance with a slick radio and billboard campaign. As Daily News staff writer Michael Hinkelman reports, the campaign is aimed at the state Senate, which has yet to approve any malpractice reform package. Talks among members of an ad hoc committee set up to recommend changes have bogged down over the issue of tort reform and caps on pain and suffering.
NEWS
April 29, 2003
HERE'S SOME free medical advice to all the doctors who abandoned their patients yesterday to protest high malpractice insurance bills: take two aspirins and then call your state representative with a better message than "We hate lawyers. " First, many state reps are lawyers and would likely take some offense at their profession being castigated. Second, the treatment being pushed for sky-rocketing insurance costs - a $250,000 cap on the amount juries can award for pain and suffering - is a few gel caps short of a solution.
NEWS
January 20, 2004
STATE SENATE hearings are scheduled for today in Harrisburg on the familiar arguments over how much someone should get in a lawsuit for pain and suffering. But there is a relatively new voice in this debate. It's not just the doctors who want to hold their liabilities down. Private businesses are now also on the bandwagon, demanding that caps be placed on what they should pay someone hurt by a product or at the workplace. Last year, the state House approved an amendment that would cap lawsuit awards for non-economic damages.
NEWS
January 21, 2001
The doctors who provide this region with some of the nation's finest medical care say they are bleeding to death. It's a financial death - brought about by a dramatic increase in the size of medical malpractice insurance premiums. For many in the highest-risk specialities - neurosurgery, obstetrics, orthopedic surgery - insurance rates have nearly doubled and now are more than $100,000 a year, making them among the nation's highest. Put yourselves in the shoes of the neurosurgeon who not long ago paid $30,000 a year for insurance on the West Coast, but now pays $105,000 in Philadelphia - a rate he expects to rise to $150,000 next year.
NEWS
March 25, 1996 | BY MOLLY IVINS
Just a few days ago, I swore I had lit my last candle for President Clinton. The occasion was his dizguzting reappointment of Alan Greenspan as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. What have any of us ever done to Clinton that he should have sicked that malodorous residue of bovine digestion on us again? This is Greenspan, guardian of the monied interests; Greenspan, who considers unemployment a boon to the economy; Greenspan, so paranoid about inflation that he'd rather throw the whole economy into recession and millions of people out of work than risk - even slightly - letting the coupon-cutters lose one iota of their unearned profits to inflation.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 8, 2014
ISSUE | MED-MAL CASES Reduce lawyers' cut If commentator Shanin Specter were so empathic toward the victims of medical negligence, perhaps lawyers such as he involved in these cases would reduce their share of a malpractice award from more than one-third to 15-20 percent, thus allowing the true victim to have a more just compensation ("Victims of medical negligence pay for reforms," Oct. 2). It all depends on whose ox is gored. |Bernard S. Sobel, D.O., Berwyn Justice calculation After reading Shanin Specter's article, I am left wondering if the concern is lack of justice for victims or loss of revenue for the malpractice firms ("Victims of medical negligence pay for reforms," Oct. 2)
NEWS
October 11, 2013
LETTER writer Barbara Ziccardi says that Republicans caused the government shutdown because "[t]hey have been blocking, or trying to block, everything the president is trying to do. " She is absolutely right. However, the U.S. Constitution created an adversarial system of government with checks and balances that allow for nonviolent disagreement between the legislative and executive branches. Also, her perspective of what is happening now is her opinion, not fact. Republicans, like me, believe that ObamaCare will drain our economy and further destroy the health-care system that was badly in need of reform.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
Petraeus not worth worshiping Thank you, Lt. Col. Daniel L. Davis, for speaking out against the idol worshipping of former Gen. David Petraeus ("More than one mistake," Tuesday). The adoration of Petraeus by members of Congress had a large part in allowing mistakes to be made in Iraq and Afghanistan. The fact that the general was caught committing adultery has brought him down, but his worst sin was his persistence in sending so many to their deaths for a lost cause. Diane L. Donato, West Chester, dianchrs1@verizon.net Don't let Norquist run state I did not vote for antitax promoter Grover Norquist for governor of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
James R. Copland is the director of the Center for Legal Policy at the Manhattan Institute and primary author of the new report "Trial Lawyers, Inc. Update: Philadelphia" Philadelphia has earned a reputation as the nation's most notorious "magnet court" for tort lawsuits. But where "Trial Lawyers Inc. " thrives, businesses flee. Seventy percent of corporate executives say that decisions on where to locate a business depend on the litigation climate. In 2011, Philadelphia's economy grew just 0.3 percent, only one-quarter the nationwide growth rate.
NEWS
September 13, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Good low-carb diet, bad low-carb diet Low-carbohydrate diets seemed perfect for me. I could lose weight and enjoy burgers, pork, and chicken. Turns out, I might be doing myself long-term harm. A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that those with low-carb diets based on animal sources of protein died earlier. On the other hand, low-carb diets that emphasize vegetable proteins (brussels sprouts, tofu, lentils, and kidney beans) were "associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease" death.
NEWS
March 4, 2010 | By Anthony Tarricone
The health-care debate has been marred by the distortions, demagoguery, and outright lies that are typical of modern American political discourse. For example, lacking any substantive ideas of their own, reform opponents have seized on tort reform - taking away the rights of injured patients - as their solution to America's health-care problems, despite ample evidence that it's no solution at all. Let's call this tort-reform fixation what it is: a sign that many Republicans are bereft of ideas and obsessed with an issue that will do nothing to lower care costs or cover the uninsured.
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