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Tortillas

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FOOD
June 12, 1994 | By Marie Simmons, FOR THE INQUIRER
Tortilla chips with tomato salsa are as trendy today as potato chips and onion dip were 25 years ago. But there is a lot more to tortillas than the chip. Before the Spanish set foot in the New World, tortillas from corn, a native grain, were a staple food in Central and South America. Once wheat was introduced to the New World, tortillas were produced with both corn and flour. Today, tortillas, both corn and wheat, are a familiar food, and gaining in popularity. When they are folded in half and crisp-fried or just heated until soft and filled with meat, beans, salad and cheese, they are called tacos.
FOOD
October 24, 1999 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: Microwavable tortilla steamer. Manufacturer: H S Inc., Oklahoma City, Okla. Where: 12th Street Cantina stand, Reading Terminal Market, 12th and Arch Streets. Price: $11.95 Purpose: Heats tortillas in 90 seconds or less. This lightweight polyethylene warmer, 7 inches in diameter and 1 inch deep, is not as handsome as some terra-cotta warmers on the market, but it costs far less and does the job equally well. And it is unbreakable - a great benefit if your children enjoy making tortilla snacks.
NEWS
May 10, 2002 | Written by staff writer Dan D. Wiggs based on truth, justice, the American way and Daily News wire services. Send insults to dwiggs@phillynews.com
AT THE University of Arizona, which is somewhere in Arizona, the new hip thing is to fling tortillas in the air at graduation ceremonies. University officials are urging students not to fling tortillas, saying it's a waste of food and culturally offensive. Ray Siqueiros, a graduate student whose wife received a degree in December, said, "It was rude. It was appalling. " We at "Would We Lie" agree with university officials. Such an act is an affront to all those who eat tortillas or wear them in religious ceremonies.
FOOD
April 29, 1992 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
"America's Funniest Home Videos" - the TV show that screens embarrassing amateur videotapes - has come up with its own "scientific theory" to explain its most common contribution: Dad losing his pants while "doin' the hokey pokey" at his daughter's wedding. It's the "belt buckle" theory: If Dad's belt buckle points down to the floor, the pants are precarious. There's a reason that a pendulous paunch is known as a "beer belly. " The latest research on the topic, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggests that excess alcohol consumption (over the body's need for calories)
FOOD
January 16, 2000 | By Marie Oser, FOR THE INQUIRER
In recent years, fresh, wholesome tortillas have become increasingly available beyond ethnic groceries and can now be found in supermarkets and health food stores. Locating whole wheat or spiced tortillas that are heart-healthy - not made with lard or hydrogenated fat - is not the daunting task it once was. Other than the obvious Mexican fare, tortillas easily lend themselves to many dishes. Beyond burritos, fajitas and soft tacos, these pliable, wheat-flour flatbreads make a convenient wrapper for any number of delicious fillings.
FOOD
March 21, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The Mexican food that swirled around our table at Topolobampo had nothing to do with the El Grande combo platters I grew up with in the Midwest. There were no rivers of melted cheese. No gaseous swamps of refried beans. No deep-fried chimichangas. No flour-tortilla-wrapped burritos. No flour tortillas at all. No. The dishes that we savored at Rick Bayless' Topolobampo, the elegant next-door sibling to his Frontera Grill in Chicago, conjured up the rich diversity of Mesoamerica's greatest cooks.
FOOD
February 27, 2002 | By RACHEL ROGALA For the Daily News
At Zocalo, located at 36th Street and Lancaster Avenue, owner Joe Ferzoco and executive chef Jackie Pestka have developed a contemporary Mexican menu that on occasion, gets a little fishy. Such is the case with the restaurant's swordfish tacos - offered as a special - which, with its special marinade and salsa cruda, is a perfect variation on beef, chicken and beans. Zocalo's hand-pressed tortillas may not be duplicated exactly, but store-purchased tortillas will work fine. ZOCALO'S SWORDFISH TACO For the fish: Four 6-ounce swordfish steaks 2 cups extra virgin olive oil 4 ounces lime juice 8 large cloves garlic (minced)
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
No need to turn on the stove for this quick meal of Tex-Mex Avocado Wrap with Red Bean Salad. Tomato salsa, avocado and sliced smoked turkey wrapped in a flour tortilla create a simple dinner. For this recipe, I sprayed the tortillas with olive oil spray. The spray adds flavor without too much fat. Flavored tortillas would be perfect for this recipe. Tex-Mex Avocado Wrap Makes 2 servings 4 6-inch flour tortillas Olive oil spray 6 ounces sliced smoked turkey breast 1/2 small ripe avocado (1/2 cup cubed)
BUSINESS
May 27, 1991 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although there are more elk than Hispanics near here - 154 versus 56, according to the latest official censuses - this is a great place for tortillas. Flour tortillas. Corn tortillas. Whole-wheat tortillas. Hundreds of thousands of them every week. Ready to be taken home and turned into tacos, burritos, fajitas and quesadillas. While this prosperous little north-central Pennsylvania town - which also boasts the nation's smallest brewery and the title of Carbon Capital of America - may seem an unlikely place to make the wrappers for many popular Mexican dishes, it was the logical choice for Gerald and Sue Riddle, for it was home.
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NEWS
July 19, 2013 | DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
THIS chowder recipe makes liberal use of two popular cheating ingredients: store-bought rotisserie chicken and salsa. You can also puree some of the vegetables to make this soup creamy without adding cream. SOUTHWESTERN CORN AND CHICKEN CHOWDER WITH TORTILLA CRISPS Three 6-inch corn tortillas 2 teaspoons ground cumin, divided 1/2 teaspoon chili powder Kosher salt 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 cup finely chopped yellow onion 1/2 pound red bliss or Yukon gold potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes 2 cups fresh corn kernels 4 cups chicken broth 3 cups chopped or shredded rotisserie chicken 1 cup salsa 1 to 2 tablespoons lime juice Chopped fresh cilantro or basil, to garnish Heat the oven to 400 degrees.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald
Juice of 4 limes 6 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts 2 large onions, halved lengthwise and cut into 1/4-inch slivers 2 bell peppers (I like red and yellow), seeds removed and sliced into strips 2 packages (7 ounces each) 6-inch corn or flour tortillas, at room temperature 1 1/2 cups guacamole (see note) 8 ounces sour cream or Greek yogurt 2 ripe plum tomatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice 1 1/2 cups grated Monterey Jack cheese Tabasco or hot pepper sauce 1. Combine the lime juice, olive oil, oregano, and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper in a measuring cup. Mix well.
FOOD
October 27, 2011
The Whole Foods on South Street got a makeover, and with it, some mouthwatering features. First, a pasta bar, which, as at the Plymouth Meeting location, has bins of fresh pasta from Westmont's Severino Pasta Co. (an Inquirer Food Team favorite). The selection rotates seasonally, including pastas such as fettuccine cut to order from fresh, flavored dough sheets, and butternut squash ravioli, priced at $4.99 to $9.99 a pound. You can also pick up Severino sauces such as pesto and vodka.
FOOD
September 22, 2011 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
You can whip up a quick Southwestern dinner without all the fat found in tacos and burritos by making quesadillas. Though quesadillas usually are served as an appetizer, these are large and filling enough for supper. Jicama, a root vegetable with a thin brown skin and white crunchy flesh, can be served raw or cooked; both ways retain its crisp water chestnut-like texture. If jicama is hard to find, sub a green salad in the meal.   Quick Quesadillas Makes 2 servings 1 teaspoon minced garlic 2 tablespoons diced red onion 1/2 cup drained, sliced  canned pimento 1/2 cup rinsed and drained canned pinto beans Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 8-inch flour tortillas 1/2 cup diced low-fat ham 1/2 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese 1. Puree garlic, onion, pimento, and beans in a food processor.
FOOD
September 15, 2011
The Mexican presence in South Philadelphia has extended far beyond restaurants and the taqueria revolution. Stores for authentic freshly made retail ingredients, too, have found their way into 9th Street storefronts, adding a taste of the Mercado Mexicano to the Italian Market. Here are a few highlights worth seeking. - Craig LaBan   Tortilla mía It smells like a Mexican village when corn masa tortillas are rolling hot off the conveyor belt at this corner tortilleria.
FOOD
May 19, 2011 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
No need to turn on the stove for this quick meal of Tex-Mex Avocado Wrap with Red Bean Salad. Tomato salsa, avocado and sliced smoked turkey wrapped in a flour tortilla create a simple dinner. For this recipe, I sprayed the tortillas with olive oil spray. The spray adds flavor without too much fat. Flavored tortillas would be perfect for this recipe. Tex-Mex Avocado Wrap Makes 2 servings 4 6-inch flour tortillas Olive oil spray 6 ounces sliced smoked turkey breast 1/2 small ripe avocado (1/2 cup cubed)
FOOD
November 19, 2009 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Southwestern fajitas with meat and colorful vegetables make a delicious, light meal. Typically, the meat is marinated overnight and then grilled, but I use a warm marinade and cut the chicken into thin strips to eliminate the wait. Quick Chicken Fajitas 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bring marinade to a boil in a saucepan. Cut chicken in thin strips, about 1/4-inch wide. Remove marinade from heat and add chicken and marinate for 15 minutes. 2. Tightly wrap the tortillas in foil and place in oven for 10 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2009
Travel the world, culinarily speaking, without leaving the Philly area at: Cousins Supermarket. 1900 N. 5th St. (at Berks), 215-236-4000; and 4037 N. 5th (at Luzerne), 215-223-4000; 200 Marlton Pike, Camden, N.J., 856-365-9230; www.cousinssupermarket.com . Good prices on regular groceries, Hispanic ingredients, spices, Goya brand, sauces, tortillas. East Asia Noodle Co. 212 N 11th St. (at Spring Street), 215-923-6838. Fresh egg roll and wonton wrappers and Lo Mein noodles. 1st Oriental Supermarket.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2009
The same pot roast can make three dinners for your family of four, as prepared in "Sandra Lee Semi-Homemade Money Saving Meals" (Meredith, $19.95). One of Lee's strategies is to use specific brands. DOWN-HOME POT ROAST 6 pounds beef chuck roast 2 cups red wine 1 cup olive oil and vinegar salad dressing (such as Newman's Own) 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 envelope (0.6 ounce) zesty Italian salad dressing mix (Good Seasons) 2 tablespoons canola oil 2 brown or yellow onions, sliced 3 stalks celery, cut into 2-inch pieces 4 cups lower-sodium beef broth 2 packets (1.5 ounces each)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2009 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
"Stay-cation" is the new vocabulary substitute for "the economy ate my real vacation travel. " Still, there is something to be said for the illusion of getting away from it all, and if good food is involved, well, you can't complain too much. San Lucas Mexican Restaurant, on the 2600 block of Federal St. in Camden, is just such a destination. Chef/owners Abela and Hugo Trinidad have been in business for nearly nine years cooking authentic cuisine from Puebla. The restaurant is set along a stretch from about 23rd Street to 35th that feels like a border town.
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