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BUSINESS
February 7, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Toshiba Corp., Japan's largest maker of nuclear-power-plant equipment, said yesterday that it would pay $5.4 billion to buy Westinghouse Electric Co. Westinghouse is a builder of nuclear plants, so the deal will give Toshiba reactor technology sought by its customers in China and the United States. Westinghouse is based in Pennsylvania and is now owned by the British government's British Nuclear Fuels P.L.C. Toshiba chief executive officer Atsutoshi Nishida said the company would acquire 100 percent of Westinghouse, but was in discussion with other companies in the United States and Japan about having them buy a minority stake.
NEWS
April 1, 1988 | By Robert A. Rankin, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Working under a veto threat, congressional negotiators last night reached agreement on all major issues in a massive trade bill, after softening punishment of Japan's Toshiba Corp. and abandoning a proposal to get tough with unfair foreign trade partners. House and Senate conferees also agreed to repeal the windfall profits tax on oil, to give the U.S. trade representative full authority over retaliation for unfair foreign trade practices, and to permit the president to retain wide discretion over granting relief to U.S. industries damaged by competition from imports.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
In the near future, your home-made videos will look much more realistic - if you shoot them with a stereoscopic camcorder. Just imagine the possibilities: "Mom's 3-D House of Thanksgiving Dinner!" "A Visit To the Dentist - 3-D" (a.k.a. "Jaws, Part XVIII"). And how about "Jim and Mary's Wedding Reception - Featuring 3-D Cake Smearing and Rice Toss. " Duck! Splat! Ugh! Like Count Floyd says on SCTV, "Ooooooh, that's scary stuff. " Inspiring such visions is news of the world's first VHS-C format camcorder designed for easy shooting of three-dimensional pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's rare when a VCR maker can boast a new model that offers a true improvement in picture clarity, but Toshiba is claiming that honor for its M- 760, a VCR that arrived in stores this summer. The M-760 is one of the first consumer-grade VCRs to use six video heads, as opposed to the usual two or four. The advantage, at least for slow-speed recordings, is demonstrable. Four video heads are favored by video hobbyists because they produce the best possible picture in both the two-hour standard (SP)
FOOD
November 12, 1986 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
There's a new method of waterless cooking using cookware that has liquid sealed in its walls. And there's a new espresso machine from Saeco in Italy that does everything from grinding the beans to steaming to brewing. The next trendy food for the health-conscious is likely to be Jofu, a tofu- based, yogurt-like snack that's free of lactose and cholesterol and lower in sodium and calories than the dairy alternative. Meanwhile, Irish spring water is the latest in chic bottled water, following on the heels of last year's offering of bottled water from Hawaii.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Mortgage & Realty Trust, an Elkins Park real estate investment trust, yesterday said that it missed a payment of $13 million due Tuesday on medium- term notes that had matured. The trust said it was trying to borrow enough to cover short-term needs. The trust also said it must come up with $97 million to pay off various borrowings that come due by March 31. And because it missed the Tuesday payments, the trust could be hit with demands for early payment on $140 million more in loans.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Are American consumers turning their backs on TV purchases? Even before recession fears began to be felt during the 1990 holiday season, electronics manufacturers were confronting a sobering fact. Sales of color-TV sets from the factory to dealers were off by about 1 million units from 1989's sales of 21.7 million. Worse, the projection for 1991 of 20.9 million sets represents little improvement. Pessimists may chalk it up to consumer caution, but there's another view.
NEWS
July 15, 1987 | BY DONALD KAUL
We were served a brilliant example of the difference between Japanese and American business last week. Toshiba, the giant Japanese electronics firm, found itself with a problem. One of its subsidiaries had illegally sold the Soviet Union some secret technology that would allow the U.S.S.R. to make its submarines quieter and less detectable to our anti-submarine forces. It was a major security breach. With allies like that, who needs spies? The U.S. Senate, in a collective rage, voted to ban Toshiba products from this country for two to five years.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Krishna Singh had hoped to know last week whether the federal Department of Energy had picked his company, Holtec International   in Marlton, for federal financing to help build a new line of nuclear power plants. Holtec has been competing with Westinghouse , of Pittsburgh, and the Texas company Fluor Corp . But the government shutdown has delayed the feds' decision, says Pierre P. Oneid , chief nuclear officer at Holtec, which builds solar, nuclear, and fossil-fuel power equipment at its own Pittsburgh-area plant.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1995 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hooking up a VCR to your TV set and cable box remains one of the most irritating experiences of modern life. So it's no wonder that electronics shoppers in increasing numbers are opting for TV sets with VCRs built right in. The TV/VCR, once fairly rare, is turning into a mainstream product, and 1994 sales were projected to surpass two million units, or about 8 percent of all color TVs sold. (Final figures aren't available yet.) Most of these models are designed as auxiliary TV sets, perhaps for use in the bedroom, kitchen or children's room.
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BUSINESS
October 8, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Krishna Singh had hoped to know last week whether the federal Department of Energy had picked his company, Holtec International   in Marlton, for federal financing to help build a new line of nuclear power plants. Holtec has been competing with Westinghouse , of Pittsburgh, and the Texas company Fluor Corp . But the government shutdown has delayed the feds' decision, says Pierre P. Oneid , chief nuclear officer at Holtec, which builds solar, nuclear, and fossil-fuel power equipment at its own Pittsburgh-area plant.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2012
THE GIZMO: Of late, the "holy grail" for many TV seekers has been an affordable 3-D TV that doesn't require special glasses. Now Stream TV Networks, a small but well-connected start-up based in Center City, claims to have the magic formula for producing just such an "auto-stereoscopic" set. And it will bring the first examples of its "Ultra-D" technology to market "by the end of the year, perhaps even by the end of" the second quarter, CEO...
BUSINESS
February 7, 2006 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Toshiba Corp., Japan's largest maker of nuclear-power-plant equipment, said yesterday that it would pay $5.4 billion to buy Westinghouse Electric Co. Westinghouse is a builder of nuclear plants, so the deal will give Toshiba reactor technology sought by its customers in China and the United States. Westinghouse is based in Pennsylvania and is now owned by the British government's British Nuclear Fuels P.L.C. Toshiba chief executive officer Atsutoshi Nishida said the company would acquire 100 percent of Westinghouse, but was in discussion with other companies in the United States and Japan about having them buy a minority stake.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The gizmo: Toshiba SD3109 DVD Video Player, $499.95. Toshiba America Consumer Products, Inc., 82 Totowa Road, Wayne, N.J. 07470. Why we care: As one of the inventors and prime patent holders of the red-hot DVD digital video disc format, it behooves Toshiba to keep pushing the technology forward, and its newest player is no exception. Among the advanced features on the SD3109 are a unique dual-disc twin-tray transport system, for pre-programming a movie double feature, two audio titles or mixed bill of film and music discs.
SPORTS
March 18, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Jim Colbert won for the first time in California, firing a 3-under-par 68 to give him a two-shot victory over Bob Eastwood in the $1 million Toshiba Senior PGA Classic in Newport Beach. The win was the 14th for Colbert on the Seniors Tour and was worth $150,000. Colbert, 55, won seven tournaments on the regular PGA Tour before joining the Seniors Tour. Colbert finished the 54-hole tournament at 201. "I'm so happy to have gotten the monkey off my back and finally win a tournament in California," Colbert said.
SPORTS
August 7, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
Second seed Conchita Martinez cruised past Wayne's Lisa Raymond, 6-2, 6-0, in the final of the $430,000 Toshiba Tennis Classic at Carlsbad, Calif., for the Spaniard's fifth title of the year. "I have been playing great tennis, playing at a high level the whole year," Martinez said after pocketing $79,500 for yesterday's win. "I went out there to play my match and I was confident that I could do it. When you feel confident, I'm sure you play good. " After being extended to three sets in her two previous meetings with Raymond, the 1994 Wimbledon champion needed just 68 minutes this time to overwhelm the ninth seed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1995 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Anyone concerned with the economies of home taping - namely, using the slowest recording speed to fit more shows on a tape - will be attracted to the promises of Toshiba's latest six-head VCRs. Three models arriving this summer (M-751, M-761 and M-781, priced from $449 to $549) continue the benefits of the six-head design that the company introduced to the consumer market a year ago. Experienced VCR users understand the superiority of machines that have two pairs of video heads.
NEWS
April 17, 1995 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Will auto navigation systems take off in the U.S., as they have in Japan and Europe? Judging from the large number of makers showcasing at the Mobile Electronics Show in Philadelphia last week, the future looks bright for brainy, futuristic gear that helps you steer a course across town or across the country. Sweetening the deal, the electronic navigators also provide useful information about accommodations and points of interest along the way. There's a downside: high prices and incompatibility between various homing devices are likely to slow the pace of this new technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1995 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hooking up a VCR to your TV set and cable box remains one of the most irritating experiences of modern life. So it's no wonder that electronics shoppers in increasing numbers are opting for TV sets with VCRs built right in. The TV/VCR, once fairly rare, is turning into a mainstream product, and 1994 sales were projected to surpass two million units, or about 8 percent of all color TVs sold. (Final figures aren't available yet.) Most of these models are designed as auxiliary TV sets, perhaps for use in the bedroom, kitchen or children's room.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's rare when a VCR maker can boast a new model that offers a true improvement in picture clarity, but Toshiba is claiming that honor for its M- 760, a VCR that arrived in stores this summer. The M-760 is one of the first consumer-grade VCRs to use six video heads, as opposed to the usual two or four. The advantage, at least for slow-speed recordings, is demonstrable. Four video heads are favored by video hobbyists because they produce the best possible picture in both the two-hour standard (SP)
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