CollectionsTotal Control
IN THE NEWS

Total Control

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 30, 2010 | By Bill Lyon FOR THE INQUIRER
He was, by turns, a painter, brushing the outer, unreachable edges of the plate, and a surgeon, carving the hitters with cool dispatch. He made the ball dive, and he made it rise. He pitched up and in, and he pitched down and away. And everything he threw moved in a different direction, save one - straight. The ball was his with which to do whatever he pleased. He had caught the genie of baseball in a generous mood. In that case, said Roy Halladay, I think I'd like to be perfect.
NEWS
December 22, 1986
South Africa's press is now practically the most controlled in the world - does President Reagan still believe "constructive engagement" with South Africa is effective? Without his support, congressional sanctions are aimless and useless. President Pieter W. Botha realizes that an end to apartheid would end his reign, while congressional sanctions are likely to remain without much change as long as apartheid continues. Only our President can coordinate pressure toward step-by-step reforms.
NEWS
January 2, 1986
In your editorial of Dec. 9 you take a "so what?" attitude about the presence of Cubans in Nicaragua. I might feel the same way were they not the harbingers of a communist takeover in the area. I am sure that the people of Ethiopia and Angola do not take a "so what?" attitude about Cuban troops in their midst. As yet they are not in Namibia, because the South Africans and Jonas Savimbi of UNITA are keeping them out. The tyranny in Nicaragua may be petty at the present time, because the Sandinistas do not have total control of the country.
NEWS
November 22, 2007 | By David R. Stampone FOR THE INQUIRER
Senegalese superstar Youssou N'Dour, clad in white pants and shoes and a smart red-and-white striped African shirt, stood beaming at center stage, taking in the applause. He and his potent 10-piece band, Super Etoile de Dakar, had just delivered a satisfying set Tuesday night in their Kimmel Center debut, more than 70 minutes, showing why he is considered one of the world's greatest singers. On display was his distinct tenor voice, a textural wonder, possessing a thick elastic tonality at bottom and rising up to the trademark keening wails that cascade down in perfectly controlled melisma.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Stuart E. Berlin, the only government employee named in the Pentagon indictment announced yesterday, had virtually total control over the awarding of certain Navy contracts, his Navy job description shows. Before his name was linked to the scandal last summer, Berlin supervised a staff of 20 engineers who bought all of the Navy's air traffic control systems for aircraft carriers, electronic systems designed to identify aircraft as friendly or hostile, and other types of electronic equipment.
NEWS
January 7, 2005
A wise young man helps an older one AFTER READING about young Kevin Johnson's 2003 attack by five teens (Dec. 22), leaving him paralyzed from the neck down, I wept. But Kevin doesn't need me or anyone else to feel sorry for him. He's strong, and in total control of a horrific situation. He'll make it, I'm sure. His words of forgiveness affected my own life tremendously - forever! Having recently been turned down for parole, after maintaining "model prisoner" status throughout my stint here in prison, I was filled with bitterness, anger and resentment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Errol Morris is best known for the landmark 1988 documentary The Thin Blue Line. Nine years later he produced Fast, Cheap & Out of Control, an exercise that blurred the line between fact and fiction, and truly pushed the envelope in what is possible in the documentary format. Morris posed the question of what - other than a shared eccentricity - a lion tamer, a topiary gardener, a robotics scientist, and a man who has made the study of mole rats his life's work have in common. As it turns out in Fast, Cheap & Out of Control, the answer is more than we might imagine.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
She was a young girl, only 6 years old, when she took a seat in Police Chief John Tegzes' office about three weeks ago. She was there to answer questions about her father and grandfather, who had been accused of molesting her. Gently coaxing the girl to talk, Tegzes was getting nowhere - and he quickly realized why. The girl's eyes kept straying to the Red Delicious apple on his desk. "Do you want some?" he asked. She nodded. Tegzes took out a knife and cut the apple into long strips that the girl gobbled up. "Can you believe that?
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | BY BRENDAN F. BOYLE
REPUBLICAN Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi recently announced his plan to dramatically change how Pennsylvania allocates its electoral votes in presidential elections. The current winner-take-all system has existed in Pennsylvania for more than two centuries, just as it does in almost every state. But Pileggi proposes, and Gov. Corbett endorses, a plan to scrap this system and instead allocate our state's electoral votes by congressional district. At first, this proposed change may seem innocuous.
SPORTS
November 20, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Carole Caldwell Graebner, who won doubles titles at the U.S. and Australian Championships in the 1960s, died yesterday. She was 65. Graebner died in New York City following a brief battle with cancer, said her daughter, Cameron Graebner Mark. The top-ranked doubles player in the United States in 1963, Graebner teamed with Nancy Richey to capture doubles titles at the 1965 U.S. Championships, now the U.S. Open, and the 1966 Australian Championships, now the Australian Open. She also won doubles titles at the 1965 and 1966 U.S. Clay Court Championships and was a finalist in singles at the 1964 U.S. Championships, losing to Maria Bueno.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 28, 2011 | BY BOB COONEY, cooneyb@phillynews.com
PHOENIX - The opening game of any sports season always brings some false hope and a little unneeded panic. Nothing different for the 76ers after they dropped a 107-103 decision to the Portland Trail Blazers Monday night in front of the 160th straight sellout crowd at the Rose Garden. The worries for Sixers' faithful starts with the play of point guard Jrue Holiday, who certainly didn't seem himself in a game in which he accumulated six turnovers and fouled out in a little less than 36 minutes of play.
NEWS
October 2, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Philadelphia Housing Authority went into a tailspin last year, Mayor Nutter tried to seize the moment to put the state-chartered agency on a different course. Philadelphia was the only major city in the country where the mayor did not control the housing authority. Nutter argued that this lack of accountability contributed to the excesses of former PHA Executive Director Carl R. Greene. He testified before lawmakers in Harrisburg a year ago that PHA was an isolated island that should be more connected to other city agencies building affordable housing.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | BY BRENDAN F. BOYLE
REPUBLICAN Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi recently announced his plan to dramatically change how Pennsylvania allocates its electoral votes in presidential elections. The current winner-take-all system has existed in Pennsylvania for more than two centuries, just as it does in almost every state. But Pileggi proposes, and Gov. Corbett endorses, a plan to scrap this system and instead allocate our state's electoral votes by congressional district. At first, this proposed change may seem innocuous.
NEWS
May 30, 2010 | By Bill Lyon FOR THE INQUIRER
He was, by turns, a painter, brushing the outer, unreachable edges of the plate, and a surgeon, carving the hitters with cool dispatch. He made the ball dive, and he made it rise. He pitched up and in, and he pitched down and away. And everything he threw moved in a different direction, save one - straight. The ball was his with which to do whatever he pleased. He had caught the genie of baseball in a generous mood. In that case, said Roy Halladay, I think I'd like to be perfect.
SPORTS
September 11, 2009 | By Andy Martino INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charlie Manuel still views Brad Lidge as an excellent closer, and he plans on shifting the bullpen dynamic this month with the goal of fixing Lidge in time for the playoffs. But if Lidge does not improve, others will use September to audition and prepare for the postseason job. What had become gradually clear this week was made official in a meeting after Wednesday's game: Lidge is no longer the Phillies' sole closer, though he could regain total control of the job this year. Last night provided the first opportunity for Lidge in his new role, which he hopes is temporary.
SPORTS
August 28, 2009 | By Andy Martino INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Phillies could hardly have asked more of J.A. Happ last night. As he has many times this season, the rookie assumed total control of a game - though this time, very abruptly, he lost it. "It's really frustrating, because it was in my fingertips," he said after Garrett Jones' two-run homer with two outs in the eighth inning spoiled what seemed like another dominant performance. With that one swing, the Phillies lost to Pittsburgh, 3-2, at PNC Park, and faced questions about their dormant lineup.
SPORTS
March 24, 2009
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Gene Michael is an adviser to Yankees miniboss Hank Steinbrenner these days. When Curt Schilling was emerging as one of the great control freaks - on and off the mound - "Stick" was the Yankees' general manager. "I tried to trade for him," Michael was saying during a rain delay that turned the Phillies media and officials dining room into an any-port-in-storm. News of Schilling's blogignation had replaced Davey Johnson's curious and inept managing of Team USA in Sunday night's World Baseball Classic debacle as the No. 1 topic of conversation.
SPORTS
November 20, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Carole Caldwell Graebner, who won doubles titles at the U.S. and Australian Championships in the 1960s, died yesterday. She was 65. Graebner died in New York City following a brief battle with cancer, said her daughter, Cameron Graebner Mark. The top-ranked doubles player in the United States in 1963, Graebner teamed with Nancy Richey to capture doubles titles at the 1965 U.S. Championships, now the U.S. Open, and the 1966 Australian Championships, now the Australian Open. She also won doubles titles at the 1965 and 1966 U.S. Clay Court Championships and was a finalist in singles at the 1964 U.S. Championships, losing to Maria Bueno.
SPORTS
November 20, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Jerry Jones envisions thousands of college students and fans filling the three-acre plazas at either end of the new Dallas Cowboys stadium, having a good time and creating home-court environments for their respective teams. "This is going to be the largest-attended basketball game in the history of this sport," the Cowboys owner said yesterday after the stadium was awarded the 2014 NCAA men's basketball Final Four. "That's neat. " About 93,000 people will be able to attend Final Four games at the stadium.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|