FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | By Shaun Stanert, Special to The Inquirer
Like surgeons directing a medical team, Virginia Naude and Jon Alley hovered over and guided a group of conservationists pondering the strategy for mending a fractured 10-ton, 41-foot high totem pole as it lay on the ground Monday morning. The massive, intricately carved, red-cedar column, known as the Creation Pole, was created in 1984 by a group of more than 100 volunteers as part of a yearlong observance of Bucks County Community College's 20th anniversary. Situated on a hill near the Hicks Art Center, the totem had greeted visitors and scraped the sky high above the campus until July 7. On that stormy Sunday afternoon, lightning ripped through the structure, splitting the top three-fourths of the monument in half.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
The photograph was striking. Bill Reid, a local artist born of a Haida Indian mother and a Scottish father, was surrounded by cheering Indians as he stood beside a 17-foot-high totem pole he had carved for his mother's village on nearby Queen Charlotte Island. The totem was the village's first in more than a century. On display at the University of British Columbia's Museum of Anthropology here, the photograph at first seemed to be a simple portrait of Reid and his host at their moment of triumph, for with the addition of the totem to their rocky coastal village, these Haida had become warriors in a current cultural reawakening of the Pacific Northwest tribes.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Shortly before 8 on Tuesday, with the long morning sunlight coming in low over the city, Ellsworth Kelly's The Barnes Totem finally settled into its permanent home outside the new gallery of the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway. The slanting sunlight caught the bead-blasted steel surface of the 40-foot sculpture, brightening its matted gray and propelling geometric shadows onto the limestone panels of the new Barnes building nearby. Gusty wind Monday had delayed the installation a day - no one, and certainly not the 88-year-old artist, wanted an eight-ton artwork swirling uncontrollably high above 20th and Callowhill Streets.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1996 | By Claire Furia, FOR THE INQUIRER
A bald eagle spreads its wings over a suburban front yard. A peaceful cow nuzzles her dainty calf outside a house. These meticulously sculpted wooden figures are the work of a different brand of artist - one whose main tools are buzzing chain saws. Benjamin Risney of Spring City, Chester County,has transformed tree trunks and logs into serene wildlife scenes, totem poles and giant grizzly bears. After storms tear down trees, Risney and other area chain-saw carvers expect to be called in after the tree surgeons are finished.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
Read more about Cirque du Soleil's "Totem" - and its Phila. connection - at www.inquirer.com/cirque
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | By Andrea Hamilton, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The totem pole is looking a little, well, naked these days. The familiar landmark towering over Neshaminy Mall and Route 1 has been stripped down to its metal uprights in anticipation of a neon makeover. The totem pole has been a local landmark for more than two decades. It was first erected in 1973, when the mall's original sign was brought down by a storm. And with a $20 million renovation currently under way at the mall, the totem pole was scheduled for modernization as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It all began with a turtle - the origins of life, that is. Or at least that's how the producers of Cirque du Soleil imagine it. Cirque's Totem , which opens on the Camden Waterfront on Thursday, tells the story of humanity's journey from amphibian depths to "its ultimate desire to fly. " There will be plenty of flying, of course, given Cirque du Soleil's brand of gravity–defying theatrics - trapeze artists, aerialists, unicyclists, and, of...
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
The artist Ellsworth Kelly was there. Joseph Neubauer, the Barnes Foundation vice chairman and donor extraordinaire, was also there. So were dozens of skilled movers, installers, crane operators, and art handlers. A swarm of project managers and members of the Kelly entourage talked and looked on in the shadow of a giant yellow crane angling from the parking lot of the Barnes' new gallery on the Parkway. They had all turned out Monday morning, waiting, as the artist put it, to "bring something back to Philadelphia" - a monumental sculpture by Kelly, his 40-foot-high, eight-ton, stainless steel The Barnes Totem . The Neubauer Family Foundation made the acquisition possible for the Barnes and, as Joseph Neubauer said, for "everyone in the city passing by. " It is the first public work installed here by Kelly, 88 and an undisputed master of American art, since his massive Transportation Building Lobby Sculpture was quietly removed from the old Greyhound office building on Market Street and sold in 1996.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
William Turnbull, 90, a highly regarded British sculptor who drew inspiration from primitive forms, died Thursday, according to the public relations firm Bolton & Quinn, which is promoting a forthcoming show of his work. The cause of death was not announced. Mr. Turnbull's works were frequently extremely simple shapes, suggesting masks or totem poles. He was exhibited at the prestigious Hayward, Serpentine, and Tate Galleries in London and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. British sculptor Anthony Gormley described Mr. Turnbull as "a radical modernist who recognizes that sculpture is of its nature archaic.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
THE BIG "first" for the local run of Cirque du Soleil's "Totem," which opened yesterday and runs through June 30, is that it is housed in a specially erected tent on the Camden waterfront. Heretofore, whenever the celebrated Montreal-based company has presented its groundbreaking blend of you-gotta-see-'em-to-believe-'em specialty acts (aerialists, acrobats, contortionists etc.) and psychedelic staging in this area, it has always been on the west side of the Delaware River. But "Totem" boasts another "first.
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NEWS
January 20, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
ALL THAT'S left is a soggy cliche, a makeshift memorial on a lonely stretch of road in New Jersey where people chuck empty beer cans into the woods without slowing down. Flowers, ribbons, police tape, an electric candle. Cheery stuffed animals that lose their charm as soon as it rains. Atop this sad totem pole, there's a white teddy bear in a ballerina outfit with the words "Camden pray for you" written across the front. Pemberton Township residents placed the items there in memory of a baby whose name they don't know.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
BEEN THINKING about treating your kids to Cirque du Soleil? To this seasoned Cirque-goer, the new adventure dubbed "Totem" is the most family-friendly of the tent spectacles brought here by the performance-art-minded, French-Canadian nouveau-circus stagers. For starters, the mostly mimed (or exotically mumbled/sung) themes are less obtuse and pretentious, more earthbound and accessible - be it the comic portrayal of the evolution of monkey to man, or the celebration of Native American music and dance.
NEWS
June 2, 2013 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
If Darwin could juggle . . . That seems to be the premise behind Cirque du Soleil's show Totem , now playing on the Camden waterfront. I don't know why it's called Totem . The press information said the narrative is about evolution; I actually couldn't find much of a narrative, despite the fact that it was written and directed by the avant-garde French-Canadian actor/director/filmmaker Robert Lepage. But narrative aside, Cirque du Soleil is always fun in a circusy way - trapeze artists, jugglers, acrobats, clowns - and it's great that it's back in the Big Top, the signature blue-and-yellow Grand Chapiteau, after several years at Temple University's Liacouras Center.
NEWS
May 31, 2013
THE BIG "first" for the local run of Cirque du Soleil's "Totem," which opened yesterday and runs through June 30, is that it is housed in a specially erected tent on the Camden waterfront. Heretofore, whenever the celebrated Montreal-based company has presented its groundbreaking blend of you-gotta-see-'em-to-believe-'em specialty acts (aerialists, acrobats, contortionists etc.) and psychedelic staging in this area, it has always been on the west side of the Delaware River. But "Totem" boasts another "first.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2013
Special Events American Sailing Tours Daily, 90-min. Delaware River tours on Chinese junk-rigged schooner. An informative History Sail, musical Tropical Sail or romantic Sunset Sail. American Sailing Tours - Pier 24, 401 N. Columbus Blvd. www.americansailingtours.com . $40-$50. Friends of Seger Park Playground Spring Festival Moon bounce, free tennis lessons for kids, face painting, karate, crafts, live music, dance performances, food & more. Seger Park, 1020 Lombard St. www.friendsofseger.org . 6/2. 11 am-3 pm. Hidden City Festival 2013 A city festival.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
Read more about Cirque du Soleil's "Totem" - and its Phila. connection - at www.inquirer.com/cirque
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Elizabeth Horkley, Inquirer Staff Writer
It all began with a turtle - the origins of life, that is. Or at least that's how the producers of Cirque du Soleil imagine it. Cirque's Totem , which opens on the Camden Waterfront on Thursday, tells the story of humanity's journey from amphibian depths to "its ultimate desire to fly. " There will be plenty of flying, of course, given Cirque du Soleil's brand of gravity–defying theatrics - trapeze artists, aerialists, unicyclists, and, of...
NEWS
November 19, 2012
William Turnbull, 90, a highly regarded British sculptor who drew inspiration from primitive forms, died Thursday, according to the public relations firm Bolton & Quinn, which is promoting a forthcoming show of his work. The cause of death was not announced. Mr. Turnbull's works were frequently extremely simple shapes, suggesting masks or totem poles. He was exhibited at the prestigious Hayward, Serpentine, and Tate Galleries in London and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. British sculptor Anthony Gormley described Mr. Turnbull as "a radical modernist who recognizes that sculpture is of its nature archaic.
NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Shortly before 8 on Tuesday, with the long morning sunlight coming in low over the city, Ellsworth Kelly's The Barnes Totem finally settled into its permanent home outside the new gallery of the Barnes Foundation on the Parkway. The slanting sunlight caught the bead-blasted steel surface of the 40-foot sculpture, brightening its matted gray and propelling geometric shadows onto the limestone panels of the new Barnes building nearby. Gusty wind Monday had delayed the installation a day - no one, and certainly not the 88-year-old artist, wanted an eight-ton artwork swirling uncontrollably high above 20th and Callowhill Streets.
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