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NEWS
October 3, 1994 | BY JOSEPH C. VIGNOLA
As co-chairman of Historic Philadelphia Inc., a nonprofit agency dedicated to making the most of Philadelphia's history, I believe economic stability can be nurtured with enhanced tourism. The proper use of tourism can help strengthen our fiscal health and lay the groundwork for a more vibrant economy. We need to recognize that tourism is Philadelphia's final frontier. The town criers and walking tours that Historic Philadelphia Inc. has begun in the historic sections represent one small step in a much larger journey.
SPORTS
July 1, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Four weeks of fun and games provided by the World Cup failed to relieve Mexico of its national problems, experts said yesterday. As thousands of fans and journalists who spent June attending the soccer tournament began leaving Mexico City yesterday, business and financial analysts said the event had not lived up to expectations. The Confederation of National Chambers of Commerce said in a statement that tourism for the World Cup had failed to reach expected levels. The confederation noted that tourism had increased in June by only 11.7 percent over the same period last year, far less than had been predicted.
NEWS
July 17, 2005 | By Joe Goldblatt FOR THE INQUIRER
During a recent tourism consulting assignment in Almaty, Kazakhstan, which means "city of apples," I was quickly escorted to the Green Market, where I tasted the delicious fruit this city is known for. I also was invited to drink the local milk that is known as "kumys" and is fermented. The source of this milk is the mare, as in female horse. Perhaps due to the fermentation or the source itself, I began to feel a little tipsy, and soon experienced the magic of this land whose settlement stretches back to Paleolithic times.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | By David Boldt
No question that Maryanne Mebane got the call of the day: a woman who wanted information on how to elope in Philadelphia. This was just the kind of inquiry that Mebane and the other staffers pray for at the Convention and Visitors Bureau's "flying saucer" information center, 16th Street and JFK Boulevard. "This would involve an overnight stay," she explained. "Perhaps several. " Moreover, the prospective groom's preference was Las Vegas, a truly worthy opponent. Mebane sprang into action, spewing out phone numbers for the marriage license office in City Hall, the Presbytery of Philadelphia, and a church in Valley Forge National Historical Park she thought would be an ideal venue for such an event.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | INQUIRER STAFF
Gov. Rendell's office announded $5 million in funding to promote Pennsylvania tourism. The awards include $1.8 million for the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corp. Other awards announced yesterday include: $400,000 for the Alleghenies region; $320,000 for the Northeast Mountains area; and $1.3 millin for the Pittsburgh region.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Youth sports tournaments have become the fastest growing sector of Bucks County's tourism industry, the county's tourism promotion agency announced Friday at its annual meeting. For instance, the Pony National Softball Championships were held on fields throughout Lower Bucks in July, attracting more than 10,000 people who booked more that 2,000 hotel rooms. The county also hosted the Patriot Games, a boys' lacrosse tournament, which drew the same amount of people. "Sometimes the biggest problem we have is getting enough fields," said Jerry Lepping, executive director of the Bucks County Conference and Visitors Bureau.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Ellen Dean Wilson, Special to The Inquirer
Longwood Gardens is fertilizing more than its soil these days; it's helping bring the area a large increase in tourism. By March, renovations on the Longwood Meeting House, owned by the Gardens, will have changed the historic Quaker site into a tourist center, which will be leased to the Chester County Tourist Bureau. Nearby, East Marlborough officials are talking to a hotel owner who wants to expand and to a New Jersey developer who wants to build a hotel. The Chester County Tourist Bureau talks to 2,500 to 3,000 people a year at an information desk it operates in the lobby of the Gardens site, according to Bea Harrison, director of group services and marketing at the bureau.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Travelers visiting Chester County spent $144 million in 1990, according to the latest figures available from the Pennsylvania Department of Commerce. The total was up 9 percent over 1989, the biggest increase in revenue from tourism in the five-county area that includes Philadelphia, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Lancaster Counties. Tourists and business travelers spent $3.2 billion in the five-county area in 1990. The increase was good news for the state and for Chester County, which collected more than $6.3 million in state tax receipts from the travel and tourism industry and more than $1.6 million in local tax receipts, according to Paul Daddario, head of the Chester County Tourist Bureau.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By C. S. Manegold, Inquirer Staff Writer
"YEEEOOOOOOOW. " Dance night at the Swallow Hotel. A lumbering, pasty-skinned Bulgarian pulled at the hand of a shy Vietnamese girl half his size, trying to get her to the dance floor. When she wouldn't go, he pulled off her conical rice hat, smashed it on his head with a shout and headed to the floor alone. Up on the stage, the band was singing to a girl somewhere in London or America, "Don't leave me, baby," and a whole table full of Soviets was singing along with more gusto than the lead singer could muster.
NEWS
January 23, 1998 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It doesn't look like much these days, just a puddle on the rocky shore of a fast-flowing, brown river. But once upon a time, all of America feverishly dreamed about this place. Husbands and fathers abandoned their homes. Sailors jumped ship seconds after setting anchor in San Francisco Bay. Lawyers and merchants and farmers and servants crossed the country to come running to this sleepy speck of a settlement tucked into the curves of the Sierra foothills. They came by the thousands, from every corner of the Earth - all because, on Jan. 24, 1848, a New Jersey-born carpenter named James Marshall, building a sawmill for wealthy landowner John Sutter, looked down at the rocks below the surface of the American River and saw gold.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By Edward G. Rendell, Thomas J. Ridge, and Rebecca W. Rimel What do Pope Francis, singer and human-rights advocate Bono, and both the Republican and Democratic national committees have in common? In the last two decades, they chose Philadelphia as the best place to advance their values and mission. And the audience was worldwide. Twenty years ago, Google was still a research project at Stanford. The iPhone was more than a decade away. And Netflix hadn't started mailing DVDs.
NEWS
September 5, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
It's said you have to take the bad with the good. The idiom applies perfectly to the Jersey Shore, where good weather can drive a seasonal economy, and bad weather can bust it. Weeks of unrelenting hot weather during prime vacation time in July and August may ultimately mean record-setting tourism spending for 2016, maybe up by as much 2 percent over last summer. But Hermine's stormy kicker over Labor Day weekend threatened to seriously dampen the bottom line for businesses that depend on every sunny day to keep them out of the red. "We were kind of counting on this weekend to push us into where we want our bottom line to be," said Toby Ciankowski, whose family operates an ice cream stand on the Wildwood boardwalk.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
The Democratic National Convention, less than two months away, is expected to be an economic boon to the Philadelphia region, powered by 50,000 visitors. But it's unclear how much is being done to lure that crowd across the Ben Franklin Bridge. While some New Jersey events are anticipated during the July convention, planning has been quiet. The tourism group marketing South Jersey, citing a tight budget and convention-goers' focus on Philadelphia, isn't preparing a promotional campaign.
NEWS
May 3, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Touting tourism gains and distribution of rebuilding grants, Gov. Christie delivered a clear message last week on the state's progress since Hurricane Sandy. "We have recovered from Sandy," he told business leaders at a Chamber of Commerce Southern New Jersey luncheon. "We've done it faster than Louisiana or Mississippi recovering from Katrina. " But gauging the state's recovery 3 1/2 years after the October 2012 storm depends on whom you ask - and how recovery is measured. Christie noted last week that 4,000 families still are out of their homes.
NEWS
December 29, 2015
DOYLESTOWN Visit Bucks County, the county's tourism promotion agency, announced its fall 2015 Tourism Grant program recipients. The program was instituted seven years ago to "assist in the development and enhancement of the not-for-profit tourism product in Bucks County," the agency said. It is supported by a portion of the Bucks County lodging tax. This fall, Visit Bucks County distributed $216,000 to 24 Bucks County not-for-profits, it said. Overall, Visit Bucks County said, it has distributed more than $2.5 million in tourism funds since 2008.
NEWS
November 8, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Add it to the list of notable Philadelphia firsts. On Friday, Philly became the first U.S. municipality to gain the elite title of World Heritage City, joining the likes of Paris, Florence, Jerusalem, St. Petersburg, and Prague. Those who lobbied for the designation - which for months has seemed inevitable, and officially was approved at the World Heritage organization's general congress in Arequipa, Peru - call it a point of civic pride. But they stress that the title has tangible benefits, too, with the potential to draw hundreds of millions of dollars in tourism revenue, strengthen Philadelphia's international image, and open business connections with the 266 other World Heritage cities around the globe.
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With a recent "topping off" ceremony marking the progress of its construction near Independence Mall, the Museum of the American Revolution clearly has become more than a dream. As progress continues toward a 2017 opening, serious consideration should be given to how the museum and other nearby attractions associated with colonial-era America can complement each other. One idea is to offer visitors a single pass that they could use to visit several sites. Participants in last week's ceremony, including former Govs.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Bowman, chief executive of Valley Forge Casino Resort, will become president of the Valley Forge Tourism & Convention Board, where he has been chairman, the Upper Merion Township casino announced Wednesday. Bowman, a veteran of the casino industry who got his start in Atlantic City, plans to step down June 15, the announcement said. Until the casino, which is controlled by investor Ira Lubert, replaces Bowman, chief financial officer Alex Figueras and chief marketing officer Jennifer Galle will oversee the property.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Can Atlantic City be a destination resort with fewer cops? Among the proposals posted last week on the website run by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority was "rightsizing" the city's police and fire departments. The recommendation, posted the day after the second city summit led by Gov. Christie, calls for reducing the police department from 330 uniformed employees to 285, and the fire department from 261 to 180. It also brought up the possibility of regionalizing both departments to further save costs.
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