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NEWS
May 1, 1997 | JIM MacMILLAN/ DAILY NEWS
Worker dismantles the media platform and other structures at Independence Square where key events of the Presidents' Summit were held. Tourists will once again have full acess to the mall this afternoon.
NEWS
November 20, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
Visitors to Independence Mall at Fourth and Chestnut Streets found yesterday that they weren't exactly at liberty to view history as they had intended. A sign posted on the Liberty Bell pavilion said: "Closed due to lack of appropriations. " It was the sixth day of a tense budget standoff between the Republican-controlled Congress and the Clinton administration. Last night both sides declared victory as a compromise was announced that would send nearly 800,000 federal workers back to their jobs and satisfy hordes of tourists.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
New Hope's upscale stores, art galleries and antique shops have always appealed to affluent older tourists. Members of the local chamber of commerce and the Borough Council want to make sure it stays that way while the borough still attracts younger tourists. Tourists in their 20s, and even teenagers, seem to be visiting New Hope in increasing numbers, said Councilman Grover Stults. The council's Community Affairs Committee met with members of the chamber last week to discuss the trend, Stults said.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
Just because you can't touch the crack in the Liberty Bell doesn't mean you can't have fun in Philadelphia. Even though budget problems shut down many federal sites and monuments, visitors yesterday found attractions with other-than-federal funding, including the Art Museum, the Betsy Ross House and the Franklin Institute. "Thank you, Philadelphia, for keeping the Betsy Ross House open," said Dorothea Ricketts of Yuba City, Calif., on a tour visiting the historic sections of East Coast cities.
NEWS
April 11, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Brandywine Valley Sampler Package with free tickets to major tourist attractions is being offered to guests of participating hotels, inns and bed and breakfasts in the area. Tourists will get free admission to the Brandywine River, Hagley and Rockwood Museums, and Longwood Gardens - among the most popular destinations in the valley where southeastern Pennsylvania meets northern Delaware. In addition, the sampler offers special discounts for the Longwood and Kennett Square Inns and the People's Light and Theatre Company.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's no small wonder that Delaware is searching for the right tourist. A paltry annual tourism advertising budget of $175,000 explains it all. That's not much when compared with the roughly $4 million that New Jersey and Pennsylvania each shell out to radio, television and newspapers to lure tourists. But Delaware, which promotes itself as the small wonder, isn't complaining. It simply has decided to become more savvy in the way it uses funds. For one thing, the state is in the throes of its first in-depth study of its tourism potential.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
There is no art museum in Germantown, no symphony hall planned for Frankford. Don't look for interactive arcades on the corner of 5th Street and Lehigh Avenue, or for Planet Hollywood at 52nd and Spruce streets. But that doesn't mean that Philadelphia tourism has to be restricted to Center City. As the city attempts to repackage itself as a premiere destination for conventions and family trips by pouring millions of dollars into developing and marketing visitor hot spots, Philadelphia's neighborhoods, - with their ethnic enclaves and storied histories - could distinguish this city from most others.
NEWS
September 3, 2004 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a fight with her boyfriend that brought Italian tourist Giulia Altera to the Big Apple for the first time and landed her in the middle of the Republican convention. "I was staying in Miami and we had a fight, so I came here, said Altera, 20, who arrived here three days ago. "I heard it was not a good time to come here, but I feel very safe. There are so many police here. " Indeed, as Altera stood in Times Square with a small digital camera capturing memories of Broadway and the big billboards of capitalism, she was surrounded by throngs of New York's finest.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
DESTINATION TEHRAN. After more than a decade of self-imposed isolation, Iran is taking steps to jump-start its tourist industry. Mahdi Hashemi, tourism director of the charitable Mostazafan Foundation, said that the first group of foreign tourists would arrive from Italy this spring, according to a radio report monitored early this month in Nicosia, Cyprus. He said the country was ready to handle 300,000 tourists, who are expected to generate more than $210 million a year under the first stage of the plan.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time Eunice and Kevin Goossens learned about the Philadelphia city workers' strike, their home in Florida was hundreds of miles behind them. Ahead of them, in Philadelphia, cantaloupes were already fermenting inside hot Hefty Bags and trash barrels were overflowing onto city streets. But their Philadelphia vacation was drawing closer by the minute, and they had gone too far to turn back. "We heard about it on the car radio coming up here," said Eunice Goossens, as she and her family strolled up Benjamin Franklin Parkway yesterday morning.
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BUSINESS
May 17, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leisure travelers "like" us - enough to generate $10.4 billion in economic impact in 2014, according to the Philadelphia region's leisure tourism marketing agency, Visit Philadelphia. In its annual report released Friday, the quasi-public agency funded through the city's hotel tax, said that on social media networks, Visit Philly, as it is known, ranks third in user engagement, measured by "liking," sharing and commenting. Besting Visit Philly were Discover Los Angeles and Los Vegas.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2015 | By Bill Iezzi, For The Inquirer
HAVANA - Jesus Escandel's brown eyes lit up like two Cuban cigars as he walked along the uncommonly smooth stone pavement and felt the fresh orange tile on the newly renovated building. Pushing open the swinging doors on Calle Animas, he stepped into a past when American gamblers, Hollywood stars, pro athletes, Mafia bosses, local politicians, and homegrown revolutionaries all once shared a legendary saloon called Sloppy Joe's. The first thing Escandel noticed was the bar to the left, 59 mahogany feet, once billed as the longest in Latin America.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matilda DeFlaviis Fumo could often be seen in the Independence Hall neighborhood, turned out as a well-dressed 18th century lady. In springtime and autumn, from the mid-1980s into 2009, Mrs. Fumo was a costumed guide for Centipede Tours. A very patient guide. The last tour that Mrs. Fumo worked alongside Centipede guide Sally A. Downey was especially memorable. Though the tour groups often consisted of local schoolchildren, this one was peopled by adults from out of state.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The future of South Jersey tourism may lie in the region's terroir . That's a French term for the climatic, topographic, and soil characteristics of a place where grapes are grown and wine is made. With a terroir that local vintners liken to France's famed Bordeaux region, South Jersey is seeking to become a destination for wine lovers. "We've got a critical mass of great wineries," Jake Buganski, executive director of the South Jersey Tourism Corp., told the audience at a wine-and-cheese reception Tuesday.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
STUFF TENDS to get fixed at my house when we know company is coming. We race around the place, see it through a guest's eye, and wonder how we let ourselves get used to the busted doorknob, the dirty wall, the ugly chair. So we repair, clean and replace. And after the guests leave, we enjoy the improvements we didn't know we'd needed until shame prompted us to look around. Well, Philly, company is coming. Over the next 17 months, we'll host the gigantic annual get-together of the NAACP (this July)
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
CANADENSIS, Pa. - The vibrant display of pumpkins, gourds, and mums sat outside the shop, where the aroma of hot apple cider filled the air. Temperatures flirted with 80, and trees were beginning to show off brilliant hues of red and orange. But something was missing: customers. "We should be busy, busy, busy," Elaine Bubb, owner of the Stonewall Garden Center, said Saturday morning. But tourists were largely avoiding the area as the manhunt for alleged state trooper killer Eric Frein entered its third week.
NEWS
July 5, 2014
ISSUE | STAYING SAFE Leave it to the pros The increase in fireworks-related injuries is easily explained, and I speak from experience as a commander for nine years of the Police Department bomb squad ("Fireworks-related injuries zoomed last year," July 2). Laws regarding who can purchase and use fireworks in Pennsylvania are as murky as the Schuylkill, making fireworks too accessible. That often puts them in the hands of individuals who have been drinking. Most disturbing, some adults allow children to use fireworks.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Paul Steinke, 49, became general manager of the Reading Terminal Market in 2001, a voice in his head cautioned him that he might be joining a dying institution. Hard to imagine why, considering that the market, especially crowded around big food holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter, attracts 115,000 visitors a week. One of America's oldest and largest public markets, it is also one of the city's top tourist attractions. Question: What worried you in 2001?
BUSINESS
November 7, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONDON - Mayor Nutter met the competition Tuesday, and it is formidable. As he goes about his eight-day trade trip to London and Tel Aviv, even the irrepressible Nutter had to acknowledge his city faces an uphill battle in the global travel and tourist market. That was evident Tuesday at the World Travel Market, a monstrous convention for 47,000 travel-industry professionals, where seemingly all the globe's nations and major cities set up booths to sell themselves. The largest such gathering in the English-speaking world, the travel market featured acres of geographic displays, organized by continents, then countries, then cities and regions.
TRAVEL
July 28, 2013
Cambodia has joined hands with Australia in an effort to use the Internet to help preserve its fabled Angkor Wat temple complex, the Australian Embassy announced this month. Name: angkorsunsets.com How it works: As part of a master plan to limit damage to the complex, a recently opened website, Angkor Sunset Finder, will give tourists recommendations for where in the 400-square-kilometer (160-square-mile) complex one can watch spectacular sunsets. Why it's needed: A handful of well-publicized spots from which to watch the setting sun attract too many tourists, endangering the place's physical and aesthetic integrity.
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