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NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Bob Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Coast Guard Thursday evening officially called off its rescue operation for two missing passengers who were aboard the amphibious vehicle that sank in the Delaware River Wednesday afternoon after being struck by a barge near Penn's Landing. Because of the time that had passed and other factors, the Coast Guard has determined there's "no chance of survival for the young man and the young woman," said Captain Todd Gatlin. Gatlin, who spoke at a Thursday evening news conference outside the Independence Seaport Museum, said the recovery operation will continue.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2013 | Associated Press
Attention, bargain-hunters around the world: Japanese goods - from cars to televisions - are going on sale. Credit Japan's drive to pump cash into its economy to stimulate growth. The extra money flooding its financial system is helping shrink the value of the yen. A dollar now buys about 100 yen compared with fewer than 80 last fall. When the yen's value falls, many Japanese goods become less expensive worldwide. By contrast, goods made in Europe, Asia, and the United States become pricier compared with Japanese products.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By DAVID FOSTER, fosterd@phillynews.com
If the statues of the Founding Fathers at Signers Hall in the National Constitution Center could speak, they would no doubt vent their frustrations with our current politicians whose arguing has us on the brink of a government shutdown. After all, they worked out the Constitution in a humid, 90-degree summer in Philadelphia - with no air conditioning. In their place, visitors to the National Constitution Center spoke out against the potential government shutdown Friday. "I'm very sick of partisan politics," said Toby Bouchey, who was visiting Philadelphia with her family from Tri-Cities, Wash.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | By David Boldt
One of the main arguments likely to be made if a referendum on riverboat gambling goes on the ballot in May is that floating casinos will enhance the city's other tourist attractions. The main problem with this argument is that it's wrong. It's wrong, at least, if Philadelphia's experience turns out to be anything like Chicago's. Research on casinos and tourists has been done in Chicago over the last several years by the Better Government Association (BGA), a business-supported "citizens watchdog group.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | By Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If you haven't heard of the Rancocas Valley, then Heidi Winzinger wants to talk to you. In an effort to lure heritage tourists to the heart of Burlington County, the 34-year-old entrepreneur has helped start a volunteer outfit - the Historic Rancocas Valley Tourism Association - targeting history buffs and family vacationers from Baltimore to Boston. "Burlington County is like this little place that gets lost," said Winzinger, seated in a sunlit office on the second floor of her parents' Hainesport business office.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Aiming to reassure tourists, Vietnam has set up a medical-assistance program that includes 24-hour hotlines and the promise of treatment and even evacuation for emergencies that cannot be handled within the country. The program took effect Jan. 1. The country's SOS Tourist Program is free to visitors holding a tourist visa and traveling as part of a tour group. Each arriving tourist gets a card listing phone numbers for "alarm centers" in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, as well as in Singapore, where International SOS Assistance, the company that developed the program for Vietnam tourism officials, has its Southeast Asia headquarters.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1995 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
For years, tourism officials have tried to come up with ways to keep tourists here longer - at least overnight. That could mean, for example, a couple would spend $100 for a hotel room and food instead of just grabbing a cheesesteak and heading for Interstate 95. But local tourism officials say they have been at a disadvantage because, to borrow a phrase, dead men don't sell. "The way that we have interpreted our history has been dry and dead," explained Karen vdH. Butler, executive director of the Mayor's Action Council for Visitors.
NEWS
August 26, 2012 | By Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press
NEW YORK - New York officials proudly tout the Big Apple as the safest big city in America. But blasts of gunfire in front of crowds near some of the city's best-known destinations this month painted a picture at odds with its tame, tourist-friendly image. Police confronted a knife-wielding man in Times Square and then shot him to death a few blocks away Aug. 11 as onlookers followed along and snapped photos. And on Friday, a gunman with a workplace grudge shot a former co-worker dead outside the Empire State Building - and then was killed himself by police in a burst of bullets that left at least nine bystanders wounded, some apparently by police rounds.
NEWS
October 13, 1991 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
Although global recession has hurt many of the world's major tourist meccas, the Pacific island of Guam is going full speed ahead in efforts to develop tourism and promote itself as the "gateway to Micronesia. " The 212-square-mile island 3,300 miles southwest of Hawaii (farther from Hawaii than Hawaii is from California) is on a building spree that's expected to triple the number of hotel rooms to 13,500 by the end of the decade. Tourists from the mainland United States and Japan, 1,500 miles away, are Guam's biggest targets.
BUSINESS
November 7, 2013 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
LONDON - Mayor Nutter met the competition Tuesday, and it is formidable. As he goes about his eight-day trade trip to London and Tel Aviv, even the irrepressible Nutter had to acknowledge his city faces an uphill battle in the global travel and tourist market. That was evident Tuesday at the World Travel Market, a monstrous convention for 47,000 travel-industry professionals, where seemingly all the globe's nations and major cities set up booths to sell themselves. The largest such gathering in the English-speaking world, the travel market featured acres of geographic displays, organized by continents, then countries, then cities and regions.
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